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The Happy Snaps thread


sunrat

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Fahrenheit did have a sorta logical point to his scale. He defined 0 as the equilibrium temperature of a mixture of ice, water and ammonium chloride. That was about as cold as he could get in the lab under his control. Then he selected 30 as the freezing point of water and 90 as approx. human body temperature. These points got refined to 32 and 98.6 eventually and the boiling point of water was then worked out at 212F under standard conditions. No problems, eh?

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V.T. Eric Layton
1 hour ago, raymac46 said:

No problem as I have been using the metric system in science for close to 60 years now.

 

'Bout 45 or so for me, but I still don't have to like it. ;) Although, I will reluctantly admit that it does make more sense.

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Some Imperial measurements are kinda strange. For instance building lots in the older parts of town are 66 X 132 feet. That is 1X2 square Gunter's chains or 32 square rods or 1/5 of an acre. OK, then...

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My favorite though is "standard gauge" for railroads. When George Stephenson built the first long distance railroad in England, he measured the axle width of 100 farm wagons and took the average - 4 feet, 8.5 inches. Since British locomotives were exported to the world, so was the gauge they were built for.

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7 hours ago, V.T. Eric Layton said:

Sometimes, Roger... you miss my obvious sarcasm. I, of course, am quite aware of the different temperature scales (Centigrade, Celcius, Fahrenheit, Kelvin, etc.), but having been born and raised and educated in this backward ex-colony of Great Britain, I just cannot get to where I like using kilometers or liters or other weird things like that. I much prefer to stick with comfortable measuring units I'm used to... giraffes, tons-a-sh*t, fat cats, little whiles, longer whiles, justa' sec, wee tads, and such. ;)

 

I got the sarcasm but made the deadpan reply to point out how weird the Fahrenheit scale is, as are most imperial measurements. We used to use them here in Australia until around the 70s so I had to unlearn some schooling.

We even used the old English style pounds, shillings, and pence until 1966. One pound = 20 shillings, 1 shilling = 12 pence. That was totally nutso.

We do use other units of course - Olympic swimming pools, MCGs (that's the Melbourne Cricket Ground) eg, enough people to fill 11 MCGs. Also tads, bee's dicks, and I have seen giraffes used recently too. 😁

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V.T. Eric Layton

HA! Yes, when I read some older literature like Dickens and such, I always got lost on the pounds, shillings, pence thing. ;)

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On 12/22/2022 at 1:10 PM, V.T. Eric Layton said:

HA! Yes, when I read some older literature like Dickens and such, I always got lost on the pounds, shillings, pence thing. ;)

Wot no halfpennies or farthings or guineas. 😜

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When I lived in Australia, the only thing I had trouble with was temperature. Then someone told me

Temperate 20's     Torrid 30's     Fiery 40's.

 

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On 12/21/2022 at 9:24 AM, raymac46 said:

Fahrenheit did have a sorta logical point to his scale. He defined 0 as the equilibrium temperature of a mixture of ice, water and ammonium chloride. That was about as cold as he could get in the lab under his control. Then he selected 30 as the freezing point of water and 90 as approx. human body temperature. These points got refined to 32 and 98.6 eventually and the boiling point of water was then worked out at 212F under standard conditions. No problems, eh?

Also easy to understand that if the temp outside is 100 degrees than it is really hot outside.

Having it be 35 degrees? Not so much.

 

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On 12/28/2022 at 2:37 AM, abarbarian said:

 

 

 

On 12/22/2022 at 5:10 AM, V.T. Eric Layton said:

HA! Yes, when I read some older literature like Dickens and such, I always got lost on the pounds, shillings, pence thing. ;)

 

I blame the move to decimal in 1970 for that.

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raymac46
19 hours ago, crp said:

Also easy to understand that if the temp outside is 100 degrees than it is really hot outside.

Having it be 35 degrees? Not so much.

 

The Celsius scale works pretty well for this actually. (if you're a Canadian at least.)

-40 Brutally cold

-30 Really  cold

-20 Uncomfortably cold

-10 Rather cold

0 Meh

+ 10 Rather warm

+ 20 Comfortably warm

+30 Really warm

+40 Brutally warm

I think the coldest I've ever been out in is -33 and the warmest probably +36 but humidity and windchills can make it feel more extreme than that.

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abarbarian
On 1/3/2023 at 3:10 PM, raymac46 said:

Adventure of the Seas docked in Portland ME, October 2022.

 

P1030022-scaled.jpg

 

 

 

Me I would be scared to travel in a ship like that. I can count 15 lifeboats on this side of the ship, I expect there are 15 more on the other side, so 30 in total for how many thousand passengers ?  🤔

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raymac46

Probably 4000 passengers and crew and they have enough lifeboats for everyone. Chances of hitting an iceberg in the Caribbean are remote. You are more likely to die of alcohol poisoning.

 

https://familycruisecompanion.com/are-there-enough-lifeboats-on-cruise-ships/#:~:text=The usual maximum capacity for,to meet the required capacity.

Edited by raymac46
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P1030104-scaled.jpg

 

Nautical survey ship Acadia - built in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1913, in service until 1969. Now a museum ship in Halifax.

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  • 4 months later...
abarbarian

Flying the fla tux.

 

orjN1Bf.jpg

 

RI7fKiZ.jpg

 

He does misbehave a lot though, gets tangled up in the most peculiar way. 🤩

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