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  1. Today
  2. Adobe has released another optional hotfix for Adobe Acrobat and Reader for Windows and macOS that addresses some important bug fixes. Reader DC and Acrobat DC were updated to version 20.009.20067. Release Notes
  3. saturnian

    Pop!_OS

    The recent review at DistroWatch (https://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20200525#popos) mentions the keyboard shortcuts as one of the key features of Pop!_OS. I'm glad more computers are shipping with Linux. I wouldn't be too concerned about the desktop; most people these days have had to learn to get used to a GUI setup they weren't used to before, seems to me.
  4. Mozilla sent Firefox Version 77.0 to the release channel today. The update included seven (7) security updates of which five (5) are high, one (1) moderate and one (1) is low in severity. Also released was Firefox ESR Version 68.9. Update: To get the update now, select "Help" from the Firefox menu, then pick "About Firefox." Mac users need to select "About Firefox" from the Firefox menu. If you do not use the English language version, Fully Localized Versions are available for download. Security Updates Release Notes
  5. raymac46

    Pop!_OS

    One of the reasons cited in the past for why the Linux desktop hasn't reached a tipping point was that OEMs didn't preinstall it on their hardware. Lately that has changed a fair bit. Lenovo and Dell are shipping Linux models, and the traditional Linux system integrators like ZaReason and System 76 are going stronger than ever. System 76 comes with its own custom distro called Pop!_OS which you can download and install if you want to. I had a look at it on a Live USB. One one hand it is the most pure vanilla GNOME desktop I've seen. No icons or docks, just an Activities button that launches the Dashboard. It looks great as it has custom fonts and icons. It is fast and very slick. I don't see a lot of advantages over Debian's GNOME or Ubuntu's version though. POP!_OS is based on Ubuntu. I'd want to tweak it a bit to suit my needs, although probably a first time user of System 76 hardware wouldn't know the drill. It would be a fair learning curve if you were migrating from Windows, since GNOME 3 is quite different. Maybe it'd be easier for OSX users, I don't know. It looks great, but right now Pop!_OS is a solution to a problem I don't have.
  6. This must be true. I'd say Alfred Hitchcock would have made an even better version of this, but ol' Alfred is not around these days. Lucky him! Hmm... wonder what Rod Serling would have done with this.
  7. securitybreach

    The Raspberry Pi

    Very cool. They sure have come a long way. I still have one of the original B models with 256mb ram and now they offer an 8gb model. I still have a couple of 1gb RPi 3s as well (one running Pi-Hole DNS for my network).
  8. sunrat

    Arch -- useful user tips

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  9. abarbarian

    Arch -- useful user tips

    Ah ha, I see. Why on earth do you not have your rsync command as an alias ? You could make changes to it easily enough.
  10. sunrat

    Arch -- useful user tips

    Haha, I had a feeling you'd ask that but my post was long enough already. I keep it in HOME and always run rsync from there. Of course it can go anywhere if you specify its full path. I never rsync the full system as I do a regular Clonezilla backup.
  11. abarbarian

    The Raspberry Pi

    Raspberry Pi 4 8GB £74 4GB £54 2GB £34 Those are not bad prices for a entry level pc.The good old PI has come a long way since it was first released. This might be of interest to folk in warmer climates, Fan SHIM for Raspberry Pi
  12. abarbarian

    Arch -- useful user tips

    You are looking at the exclude file for my root partition backup. You are correct in thinking that the way I have written it keeps the folder but does not keep the contents, this is because I will try to use this script to make a fresh install on a new drive.So I would like to have the folders created but not the temporary contents. MY exclude file for home looks pretty much like yours but a little longer. I keep a copy of the script in my Zim on a sub page of the Scripts entry and I use the "n" option whilst testing. Never came across mention of logging the rsync so do not do so, seems a bit superfluous if testing with the "n" option. There are a ton of guides out there but a lot of them are cut and paste jobs just presented slightly differently. The rsync man pages are good but take some working through and are a bit confusing for a novice like me. Though you can find some clear and concise guides or guides that have some relevant sections out there.Rsync was designed for backing up servers to remote locations not for small local backups so it is hardly surprising that the guides are a tad complex and lacking in basic instructions. Where do you keep your exclusion file as I notice you do not state a path for it ?
  13. sunrat

    Arch -- useful user tips

    Debian doesn't have a ~/bin by default but it recognises it in $PATH if you make one. I have several scripts in there. I installed something with PIP recently which it placed in ~/.local/bin/ and PIP kindly alerted me to manually add that directory to $PATH. You can simplify the syntax a little for your rsync exclude file. Here's mine for home backup: chromium rsyncerrors rsynclog Sync temp .cache .local .mixxx .thumbnails .wpa_cli_history Note that 2 of those are files and the rest directories. Everything is a file in Linux! Doesn't need "/" or "*" and excludes the directory and all its contents. I think yours only excludes contents. I actually just keep the commands for rsync in a text file as I usually like to do a dry-run first so copy/paste that and the just delete the --dry-run to do the actual sync. rsync -avi --dry-run --delete --progress --exclude-from=rsync_exclude /home/roger/ /mnt/stash/Backup/home-brain2/ 1>rsynclog 2>rsyncerrors Which reminds me - it's about backup time I don't automate it as it doesn't change that fast and I don't keep much important stuff in home anyway. I treat it as a staging post for downloading and daily work before moving things I want to keep to a storage drive. A short time later - Backup done. I changed the command a little so it would write messages to a file simultaneously with showing on the terminal. Previously it only wrote to 2 files and the "rsync-errors" file was always empty anyway. And remove "--progress" - it shows only progress of each file rather than the whole process so is not particularly useful in this case: rsync -avi --dry-run --delete --exclude-from=rsync_exclude /home/roger/ /mnt/stash/Backup/home-brain2/ 2>&1 | tee -a rsynclog
  14. Yesterday
  15. V.T. Eric Layton

    Most Popular Desktop Browsers 1994 - 2020

    Well, I didn't have any choice going from G.T.E. to Verizon (phone service) and my only options when I decided to do something more than dial-up back in 2002 or so were Brighthouse Cable and Verizon's DSL. I didn't have a relationship with Brighthouse and I don't care for cable Internet, so that left Verizon as the only option. I never really had any complaints with Verizon as a phone provider or DSL. Unfortunately, a couple years after stringing all their fiber in Tampa and me being on their FIOS system for some while already, they sold the entire shebang to Frontier. I hadn't heard any good things about Frontier, but again... not many other options to be had. I haven't had any real issues with Frontier, actually. Their changeover from Verizon to their control was a giant cluster screw, but I have sympathy for Frontier in this instance because I found out from friends (Verizon techs who were "sold" to Frontier) that Verizon just literally dumped their FIOS network on Frontier and ran away as fast as they could. Unfortunately, Frontier's hardware and software wasn't compatible with the Verizon system. It took some SERIOUS work from Frontier engineers and techs to work out all the kinks. They managed it in just a couple weeks after going live on Verizon's network. I thought that was an amazing job! Since then, though, no issues with Frontier. Their customer support is OK; their tech support is outstanding, though. All's well.
  16. ebrke

    Most Popular Desktop Browsers 1994 - 2020

    In my area, Verizon has a not-so-good reputation. While Comcast is pretty awful, for me it comes down to the devil you know. And I must say, my last encounter with Comcast's off-shored Customer Service was actually pretty good.
  17. That blank look... ah... that happens quite often these days.
  18. V.T. Eric Layton

    New Linux User Declares Self Safe From Coronavirus

    Nah... on the last one, it was on when I spelled the coffee on it. It fried. Cleaning it wouldn't have done any good at all.
  19. V.T. Eric Layton

    Windows 10 May 2020 Update Roll-out Has Started

    All my Win 10 updates went fine. YAY!
  20. abarbarian

    Arch -- useful user tips

    Example of rsync as script with functions for simple backups using a exclude-from file Follow the same steps as the previous post but in the script instead of adding every "--exclude" on a separate line use a "exclude-from=text file". I created two exclude-from files "ex-root" and "ex-home" and placed them in "/home/bloodaxe/Linux/Scripts/dback/". This the "ex-root" exclusion file, here are the changes I made to the script, As you can see a much neater script and having a "exclude-from=file" makes it easier to add extra files and folders for exclusion. Searching on the net I found that there are a few different ways to write the "exclude-from=file". The way I settled on seemed simplest to me and also looks the neatest. These links were helpful, https://www.howtogeek.com/168009/how-to-exclude-files-from-rsync/ https://sites.google.com/site/rsync2u/home/rsync-tutorial/the-exclude-from-option https://askubuntu.com/questions/320458/how-to-exclude-multiple-directories-with-rsync I will be refining the script again but have a load of reading to do first. So an update may take some time.
  21. raymac46

    An Upgrade

    Looks like I might have another upgrade job in future once I can get back together with my daughter's family. My son-in-law is planning to replace his aging Sandy Bridge i5 laptop with a new 10th gen Intel i5 Vivobook. I'll see if I can take the old one, replace its HDD with an SSD, install Linux - and then the grandkids will have a spare unit for schoolwork or browser games. The old machine is an HP Probook and it looks a lot easier to work on.
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