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abarbarian

Women in Open Source computing.

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abarbarian

DevOps is 90% change and 10% technology (2015)

 

 

Jen Krieger used her first computer in the early 80s and maintained a strong interest in technology ever since. She started her career as a financial analyst and eventually moved into IT where she gained expertise in software development and releases. Jen has worked with many development methods, from waterfall to Agile.

Now, she's an Agile coach at Red Hat for the teams working on Project Atomic, Docker, and Kubernetes. This year, Jen is speaking at DevNation about what it means to be a DevOps engineer, and in this interview she tells us about the challenges of implementing DevOps, shares some advice for engineers, and more.

 

:breakfast:

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abarbarian

Open source licensing important for future of Internet of Things (2015)

 

Cat Robson is a user experience strategist and manager working on the Red Hat user experience team. Since arriving at Red Hat in 2012, she has influenced the design of the JBoss Developer website, JBoss EAP, JBDS, and other products. She helps teams see how a user experience focus can improve the quality of their offerings. She teaches each part of the organization to become passionate about the user experience.Prior to her talk at DevNation this year, I reached out to her so we could learn more about her work at Red Hat and about the future of open source licenses in the Internet of Things (IoT) era.

 

:breakfast:

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Capt.Crow

A young lady friend has just started with Facebook Dublin office on the moderaters desk for japan and those regions .

I'm just wondering how long it will be before shellshock sets in .

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goretsky
abarbarian

Women In Security Speak Out On Why There Are Still So Few Of Them (2015)

 

 

 

Just 10% of information security pros worldwide are women today, according to the latest data from (ISC)2, despite the fact that women are getting more high-profile roles in the industry and that there are job opportunities aplenty. It's a reality that confounds and frustrates many women in the industry, who today represent a mix of researchers, chief information security officers, executives, and top government cyber security leaders.

While women make up a tiny fraction of the industry, the good news is that there are more of them with high-profile roles in security than ever before, a trend that was evident last month at the RSA Conference in San Francisco, where women in top cyber security official jobs at the US Department of Homeland Security, US-CERT, National Security Agency, the White House, and Department of Justice, were featured speakers, as well as security researchers-turned security executives and other corporate security execs.

 

Neat articles Goretsky. I thought this one deserved an extra bump. :breakfast:

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abarbarian

Sharp, Shah Win 1st Women in Open Source Awards (2015)

 

 

Interview with winner of Red Hat's Women in Open Source Academic Award, Kesha Shah (2015)

 

 

As many have said, for us to have the most diverse ideas we need to have the most diverse backgrounds. Red Hat reinforces that sentiment today with the announcement of their first winner of the Women in Open Source, Academic Award: Kesha Shah.

A multitude of contributions to open source from women all over the world were evaluated, nominations were made, and finally, votes were cast and tallied for the two awards that comprise the Women in Open Source Award from Red Hat: the Community Award and the Academic Award.

The winner of the Women in Open Source, Community Award is Sarah Sharp. See our interview with her. Also, view all of the finalists for the awards.

Red Hat's hope is that the number of women contributing to open source grows by leaps and bounds in the coming years. Recognition is a great start.

 

:breakfast:

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abarbarian

Women in IT Security: 10 Power Players (2015)

 

These 10 women were selected for their longstanding contributions to the IT security space. As veterans in the field, they've served as exemplary women taking on leadership roles in the community. We celebrate by offering their stories as well as testimonials from colleagues who have been inspired by them.

 

:breakfast:

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securitybreach

Great, glad you enjoyed it :)

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ebrke

Really interesting. Hard to believe how quickly things changed in the early '80s.

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abarbarian

Really interesting. Hard to believe how quickly things changed in the early '80s.

 

Even more interesting is the fact that apart from a few geeks and feminists no one has heard of them. It has all been IBM,Job's and Gate's,Apple etc. Ask most ordinary folk who started the pc industry and you will get Windows or Apple as an answer. :whistling:

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securitybreach

Really interesting. Hard to believe how quickly things changed in the early '80s.

 

Even more interesting is the fact that apart from a few geeks and feminists no one has heard of them. It has all been IBM,Job's and Gate's,Apple etc. Ask most ordinary folk who started the pc industry and you will get Windows or Apple as an answer. :whistling:

 

Yeah, well most people are also complete morons.

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abarbarian

Really interesting. Hard to believe how quickly things changed in the early '80s.

 

Even more interesting is the fact that apart from a few geeks and feminists no one has heard of them. It has all been IBM,Job's and Gate's,Apple etc. Ask most ordinary folk who started the pc industry and you will get Windows or Apple as an answer. :whistling:

 

Yeah, well most people are also complete morons.

 

As are we all outside our own field of knowledge :whistling:

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abarbarian

Patricia Torvalds on computing

 

 

What made you interested in studying computer science and engineering?

 

(spoiler alert: it wasn't her father)

 

My interest in tech really grew throughout high school. I wanted to go into biology for a while, until around my sophomore year. I had a web design internship at the Portland VA after my sophomore year. And I took an engineering class called Exploratory Ventures, which sent an ROV into the Pacific ocean late in my sophomore year, but the turning point was probably when I was named a regional winner and national runner up for the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing award halfway through my junior year.

 

 

Neat. :breakfast:

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abarbarian

How open source helped one woman break into the tech industry (2015)

 

 

 

Can you describe your first interaction with technology?

 

I started putting my hands on computers at a very young age, 8 years old more or less, thanks to my mom. My parents run their own business and my mother is in charge of all accounting and management duties, so when my brother and I were young she decided to move her office to our house and take care of us (a pioneer of remote work, huh?). When she finished her daily work, she would always tell me to sit with her so that I could learn how to use the computer.

Then, when I was about 13 years old, there were many old pieces of hardware around my house that I decided to restore and use as a lab. In this lab I ran early GNU/Linux versions and such. That's when things started to get serious. :)

 

 

Neat. :breakfast:

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abarbarian

DjangoGirlsCon? (2015)

 

The organization grew from just two people to hundreds of organizers, contributors, and coaches. From Canada to Australia, the Django Girls were everywhere. You can learn more about the program by listening to this year's
by myself and Ola Sitarska.

 

:breakfast:

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abarbarian

Girls Can Code aims to inspire new generation of coders (2015)

 

 

BBC talent show to scour the country for programming talent

The BBC is launching a new talent show called Girls Can Code aimed at inspiring more girls to take up computer science, engineering and coding.

 

Cambridge University runs coding summer school for girls (2015)

 

 

“We were really impressed with how excited, interested and creative the girls were,” said the university’s Dr Robert Harle. “Starting from nothing, they were able to build a simple web game and then independently add new gameplay options, graphics, scoring mechanisms and all sorts of great additions we had never thought of.

“The girls were extremely social and created a great learning atmosphere. They were self-motivated and a pleasure to teach. We hope that they continue to develop their new skills and spread the word to their friends.”

 

:breakfast:

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securitybreach

Neat stuff

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abarbarian

Outreachy and the road toward diversity (2015)

 

 

Diversity has a new full-time ally. Marina Zhurakhinskaya (zhoo-ra-HEEN-ska-ya) recently won an O'Reilly award for her work in diversity for free and open source software (FOSS), and she just successfully created a new position for diversity at Red Hat. Oh, and, she's a new mom.

Marina is always happy to share details about her work, so you can be sure to get a lot out of her responses to the questions I asked her about her new award, her role at Red Hat, and her work with Outreachy, a program to help underrepresented groups get involved in FOSS. For instance, she explains how she and her husband managed a new baby at OSCON this year, where she received her award.

 

:breakfast:

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abarbarian

Intel doubles its bounty for women and ethnic minorities (2015)

 

 

 

Intel is currently offering $4,000 (£2,560) to employees who suggest job candidates that help it achieve its diversity goals, according to the Wall Street Journal.

 

 

“Intel is committed to increase the diversity of our workforce,” the company said in a statement seen by the paper. “We are currently offering our employees an additional incentive to help us attract diverse qualified candidates in a competitive environment for talent.”

 

:good2:

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abarbarian

Startups, burnout, and the path to happy employees (21015)

 

 

 

Leah Silber is CEO and co-founder of Tilde, a training and consulting startup with a focus on open source led by alumni and current leaders of projects like Ruby on Rails, jQuery, and Ember. Tilde is also the company behind Skylight, a Rails performance tool.

 

Leah told me that Tilde contributes back by building and maintaining the vibrant open source communities they love. To do that takes a lot of time and effort, so how does she maintain? How does anyone in open source get it all done without burnout? Leah explains in this interview.

 

Find out more in her upcoming All Things Open talk: Designing the startup you always wanted to work for.

 

:breakfast:

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goretsky

Hello,

 

Two of my colleagues gave a talk on diversity at this year's Virus Bulletin conference.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

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abarbarian

Personnel shortage and diversity in IT: Is it truly a problem?(2015)

 

 

I expanded Goretysky's link from above one of the co presenters was,

 

 

Lysa Myers

 

Lysa Myers began her tenure in malware research labs in the weeks before the Melissa virus outbreak in 1999. She has watched both the malware landscape and the security technologies used to prevent threats grow and change dramatically. Because keeping up with all this change can be difficult for even the most tech-savvy users, Myers enjoys explaining security issues in an approachable manner for companies and consumers alike. Over the years, Myers has worked both within anti-virus research labs, finding and analysing new malware, and within the third-party testing industry to evaluate the effectiveness of security products. As a Security Researcher for ESET, she focuses on providing practical analysis and advice of security trends and events.

 

:breakfast:

 

Mozilla creates web tools and practices for open science (2015)

 

Abby Mayes is a lead developer for Mozilla Science Lab, which is a global network of researchers, tool developers, librarians, and publishers who work to further open science on the web. Abby has previously done work as a bioinformatics software developer, was a mentor on the Genome Informatics Group, and has won several awards for science and mathematics.

In this interview with her prior to her talk at All Things Open this year, find out more about how to open up scientific data.

 

:breakfast:

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abarbarian

Systers

 

Join Systers

 

It’s important to know that you are not alone. Systers is a forum for all women involved in the technical aspects of computing. The community has over 6,000 members from at least 60 countries around the world. We welcome the participation of women technologists of all ages and at any stage of their studies or careers. Systers is the world’s largest email community of women in technical roles in computing. It was founded by Anita Borg in 1987 together with 12 other women as a small electronic mailing list for women in “systems”.

Anita’s vision in creating Systers in 1987 was to “increase the number of women in computer science and make the environments in which women work more conducive to their continued participation in the field.”

 

Don't know whether to sing

 

Now there was a time when they used to say

That behind every great man there had to be a great woman

Now in these times of change, you know that it's no longer true

So we're comin' out of the kitchen

'Cause there's somethin' we forgot to say to you

We said, "Sisters are doin' it for themselves"

Standin' on their own two feet

And ringin' on their own bells

We said, "Sisters are doin' it for themselves"

 

or be very very worried

 

The Borg Queen has a unique personality and a sense of individuality that normal Borg drones are not allowed. She is usually the one who "speaks" for the Collective in situations where contact with outsiders is best conducted by an individual. But for the Borg Queen the concepts "I" and "we" are interchangeable. In her own words, she is the "one who is many."

 

:228823:

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abarbarian

Coding in a safe place (2105)

 

 

 

The Python Software Foundation's (PSF) Director Carol Willing is ready for the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women conference to start on October 14. One of the many highlights of her week will most definitely be the Open Source Day Codeathon, where some attendees will be making their very first contributions to open source.

 

Carol will be mentoring coders for OpenHatch and the Systers' Volunteer Management System. OpenHatch matches people with projects, and Systers is the largest tech forum for women in the world. Learn more about these projects, and the PSF's role at Grace Hopper this year, in this interview.

 

Carol also co-organizes PyLadies in San Diego, a meetup group for women in the area to learn about and practice Python.

 

:breakfast:

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securitybreach

Neat :thumbsup:

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LilBambi

Awesome! :thumbsup:

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abarbarian

Linux Kernel Community's 'Toxic Background Radiation' (2015)

 

 

 

Longtime Linux kernel developer Sarah Sharp last week published a blog post detailing her reasons for quitting the Linux kernel community.

Sharp maintained the USB 3.0 host controller driver until January, when she decided to leave rather than continue to "contribute to a community where I was technically respected, but I could not ask for personal respect," she wrote.

 

:breakfast:

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ebrke
Sharp maintained the USB 3.0 host controller driver until January, when she decided to leave rather than continue to "contribute to a community where I was technically respected, but I could not ask for personal respect," she wrote.
That's a shame. And much as I admire Linus, I doubt it's a issue that's on his radar.

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LilBambi
Among her concerns:
  • Maintainers often were blunt, rude or brutal, spewing vile words;
  • People were allowed to get away with sexist and homophobic jokes;
  • The Code of Conflict lacked both specificity and teeth; and
  • Senior kernel developers defended the "right" of maintainers to indulge in verbal and emotional abuse in order to release their own frustrations.

 

This is the very elitist behavior that Bruno tried to keep away from Bruno's BATL because it was rampant in the Linux community as a whole for a long time.

 

I thought we were beyond that now with the more positive help that many Linux communities provide these days after Bruno's excellent example.

 

I love Linux, but so many of us were the brunt of that type of behavior trying to get help in the Linux community years ago.

 

It has been so much better since Bruno took over BATL and became the very positive influence for those needing help in the Linux community as a whole.

 

But that elitist attitude appears to be alive and well among developers still? Sigh...

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