Jump to content

Good Reads - Discussion of Books, Literature, Reading, etc.


Recommended Posts

On 7/10/2020 at 1:16 PM, V.T. Eric Layton said:

 

 

Yeah... Yeah... irregardless of that. ;)

regardless and irregardless are both legitimate words. irregardless is supposed to indicate "end of discussion" but otherwise has same meaning. So regardless of what you may have seen on the interweb, irregardless is regard.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 225
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • abarbarian

    50

  • V.T. Eric Layton

    42

  • Fuddster

    13

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I started reading years of back issues of monthly publications like Nebula and Galaxy and many others, all tied up in bundles by year in the attic of a friend of my mother. It started when I was about

Sadly, I had to quit buying actual books. They were taking over my home because I never got rid of any of them. After eliminating 3/5s of my 15K editions a few years ago (just kept the special books

I remember The Shadow shows.  One of my favorites as a kid.

abarbarian
On 10/3/2020 at 2:45 PM, sunrat said:

Haha awesome. You realise the Betoota Advocate is none of those things it claims to be in that quote. It's an internet news satire site. Funny as he11 most of the time. Very Aussie.

https://www.betootaadvocate.com/

 

Yeah I worked out that it is similar to Punch or Private Eye. I do love staire. 😎

Link to post
Share on other sites
sunrat
1 hour ago, crp said:

regardless and irregardless are both legitimate words. irregardless is supposed to indicate "end of discussion" but otherwise has same meaning. So regardless of what you may have seen on the interweb, irregardless is regard.

 

 

I know it's accepted these days but it doesn't make sense. The first and last syllables sort of cancel each other out so it should be a double negative. Stupid millennials, shame on the education system.

Link to post
Share on other sites
V.T. Eric Layton
6 hours ago, crp said:

regardless and irregardless are both legitimate words.

 

I'll politely disagree with this statement and move on to avoid any debate. Have a wondrous day!

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, sunrat said:

 

I know it's accepted these days but it doesn't make sense. The first and last syllables sort of cancel each other out so it should be a double negative. Stupid millennials, shame on the education system.

it is not a "these days" thing. if anything, the "these days" are doing the word shouldn't be used. "irregardless"  goes back to at least 1790s. (regardless dates back to at least the 1550's).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
abarbarian

Kurt Vonnegut’s Unpublished World War II Scrapbook Reveals Origins of “Slaughterhouse-Five”

 

Quote

According to Christie’s, the notes reflect Vonnegut’s “trademark satire and dry humor” under even the most dire of circumstances. In a January 3, 1945, letter composed around two weeks after his capture, he offers a gross understatement: “It’s been one helluva holiday season for all of us.” And, in a message written two days after his liberation, he declares, “It is a source of great delight to be able to announce that you will shortly receive a splendid relic of World War II with which you may decorate your hearth—namely, me in an excellent state of preservation.”

 

Quote

Vonnegut himself once darkly stated that the Dresden bombings were so meaningless that he may have been the only individual to have gotten something out of them. “One way or another, I got two or three dollars for every person killed,” he once said. “Some business I’m in.”

 

Those notes and stuff would be a fascinating read I bet. 😎

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
abarbarian

Just finished The Warrior Chronicles by Bernard Cornwell got the series from a link kindly posted by someone earlier in this thread. Thanks. Am now reading The Girl in the Woods by Lackberg Camilla (z-lib.org). Love that Swedish vibe, am watching The Bridge on tv at series 4, fascinating stuff. 😎

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Assimov's Treasury of Humor. 

Read it decades ago, not a story just a collection of jokes. 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
sunrat
2 hours ago, crp said:

Assimov's Treasury of Humor. 

Read it decades ago, not a story just a collection of jokes. 

 

 

*Asimov   😉

Link to post
Share on other sites
abarbarian

THE MISTBORN® SAGA – THE ORIGINAL TRILOGY

 

Quote

Mistborn is the name of Brandon’s epic fantasy trilogy. The first book is technically Mistborn: The Final Empire, though people just tend to call it Mistborn or Mistborn 1. The entire trilogy consists of The Final Empire (2006), The Well of Ascension (2007), and The Hero of Ages (2008). It’s a hybrid epic fantasy heist story with a focus on political intrigue and powerful action scenes.

 

I enjoyed these, took my mind of covid for a good long while. 😎

Link to post
Share on other sites
V.T. Eric Layton

Non-murder mystery... hmm... I can't think of any non-murder mysteries right off the top of my head. :(

 

Oooh, I thought of one...

 

- The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
abarbarian
10 hours ago, crp said:

anyone have non-murder mystery books that they liked?

 

 

I listened to the BBC adaptation lately of these books I enjoyed when I was younger. From 1927 they are still a great read.

 

The_Midnight_Folk

 

Quote

The Midnight Folk is a feast of imaginative story-telling, a glorious cornucopia of pirates and witches, lost treasure and talking animals. Although it was published in 1927, it evokes an older world: houses are lit by oil lamps, and travel is by horse, carriage – or broomstick. Masefield perfectly captures a child’s perspective, from the terrors of tigers under the bed to the horrors of declining a Latin adjective. Yet there is also plenty of humour that adults will appreciate, from Miss Piney Trigger, who swigs champagne in bed and prides herself on having backed a host of Derby winners, to Kay’s lessons: ‘Divinity was easy, as it was about Noah’s Ark. French was fairly easy, as it was about the cats of the daughter of the gardener.’ This mingling of past and present, reality and fantasy, has made this one of the most rewarding and influential children’s books ever written.

 

The Box of Delights


 

Quote

 

“This witty and wonderful children’s novel by the onetime Poet Laureate of the UK is widely beloved on the other side of the pond, but lesser known here. A travesty, that, since it’s a magic box in itself: a magical adventure that begins with a boy on his way home for Christmas, stopped by a man who implores him, ‘And now, Master Harker, of Seekings, now that the Wolves are Running, as you will have seen, perhaps you would do something to stop their Bite?’ Enter wizards and witches, mice, Roman soldiers, the toughest little girl you’ll ever meet, and Christmas just might be saved after all.” —Flavorwire

 


 

 

Another BBC adaptation I listened to a short while ago tempted me to dig up the couple of Tin Tin albums I own. They too are a good read though possibly not true books.

 

The Adventures of Tintin

 

Quote

The Adventures of Tintin were a veritable initiation into geography for entire generations. At a time when television didn’t exist, the international expeditions undertaken by the young reporter opened young people’s eyes to countries, cultures, landscapes and natural phenomena which were still relatively unheard of. From the sands of the Sahara to the glaciers of the Himalayas, from the Amazon rainforests to the Scottish highlands, Hergé’s pictures overflow with details revealing a world full of wonder, danger and excitement – a passionate introduction to Planet Earth.

 

Then there is one of my favourite mystery books.

Quote

The Tao Te Ching is a series of meditations on the mysterious nature of the Tao--the Way, the guiding light, the very source of all existence. According to Lao Tzu (a name meaning "the old master"), the Tao is found where we would least expect it--not in the strong but in the weak; not in speech but in silence; not in doing but in "not-doing."

 

Tao Te Ching


 

Quote

 

In what may be the most faithful translation of the Tao Te Ching, the translators have captured the terse, enigmatic beauty of the original masterpiece without embellishing it with personal interpretation or bogging it down with explanatory notes. By stepping out of the way and letting the original text speak for itself, they deliver a powerfully direct experience of the Tao Te Ching that is a joy to come back to again and again.

And for the first time in any translation of the Tao Te Ching, now you can interact with the text to experience for yourself the nuanced art of translating. In each of the eighty-one chapters, one significant line has been highlighted and alongside it are the original Chinese characters with their transliteration. You can then turn to the glossary and translate this line on your own, thereby deepening your understanding of the original text and of the myriad ways it can be translated into English.

 


 

 

Enjoy 😎

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
abarbarian

https://b-ok.cc/s/Liu Cixin/?e=1&yearFrom=&yearTo=&language=&extension=

 

Cixin Liu is best known for his mind-bending trilogy The Three Body Problem.Finished this trilogy last week, a most interesting read.

Seems like the guy is china's first really famous sci-fi writer. These two articles on him are well worth a read too.

 

“To Reach the Pure Realm of the Imaginary:” A Conversation with Cixin Liu

 

Liu Cixin’s War of the Worlds

 

😎

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...