Jump to content
crp

The Raspberry Pi

Recommended Posts

Ha don't know why but I ordered one. :Laughing:

 

Because you have more £ than you know what to do with. ;)

 

I have a plan.

 

I hope to run

 

https://arkos.io/

 

or

 

http://www.instructa...-TURNKEY-LINUX/

 

or something similar. so that I can run a Ghost blogg from home along with a cloud server for fun.

 

That is if I live long enough. :hysterical:

 

At least you have something to live for.* :thumbsup:

 

*And yes. I know that's bad grammar, but it sounds so much less snooty than, "At least you have something for which to live." When I type it like that, I feel as though I should have my pinkies sticking out and some tea and crumpets on the sideboard next to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://linuxgizmos.c...survey-results/

 

Whilst the Pi is still top favourite there are some decent alternatives as this neat article shows.

 

:breakfast:

Had I known this was coming I might have held off buying my Odroid C1 but then again the new Pi won't run Android. With the Odroid I can boot either android or Ubuntu, depending on what I want to do. Once the new Pi gets Win 10, I might consider getting one just to see how it runs.

 

I did some reading around this new Pi and it looks like you may be able to get Android working on it. No links I am afraid to say and am too busy to provide any. Android for Pi may still be a work in progress I did not pay too much attention to the info as I am not interested. :breakfast:

You should have been able to run Android on the old Pi but the foundation "turned up its nose" at the idea. I doubt that they'll change their attitude for the new one.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You should have been able to run Android on the old Pi but the foundation "turned up its nose" at the idea. I doubt that they'll change their attitude for the new one.

 

Well the Pi was originally and still is made for Educational purposes. Android is not oriented towards education and I do not think you can install any programming language compiler on Android. Point being, I can understand why they chose to support Linux not Android.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You should have been able to run Android on the old Pi but the foundation "turned up its nose" at the idea. I doubt that they'll change their attitude for the new one.

 

Well the Pi was originally and still is made for Educational purposes. Android is not oriented towards education and I do not think you can install any programming language compiler on Android. Point being, I can understand why they chose to support Linux not Android.

That's the excuse the Foundation people gave and it simply isn't true. Search on the word "programming" in the Play Store and see all the hits you get. The real reason, IMO, is that the Foundation was never given the source code from Broadcom that was needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How to Install Android on Raspberry Pi ? (2014)

 

 

Installing Android OS is very easy on Raspberry Pi. It must be installed on a SD-Card usually a 4GB card to enable the installation of other apps and media files. The Android UI is still buggy on Raspberry Pi and crashes a lot and is very slow. Hence it is recommendable to install the OS only on the version of Raspberry Pi with memory of 512 MB or more.

 

:whistling: :whistling: :whistling:

 

Ha don't know why but I ordered one. :Laughing:

 

Because you have more £ than you know what to do with. ;)

 

I have a plan.

 

I hope to run

 

https://arkos.io/

 

or

 

http://www.instructa...-TURNKEY-LINUX/

 

or something similar. so that I can run a Ghost blogg from home along with a cloud server for fun.

 

That is if I live long enough. :hysterical:

 

At least you have something to live for.* :thumbsup:

 

*And yes. I know that's bad grammar, but it sounds so much less snooty than, "At least you have something for which to live." When I type it like that, I feel as though I should have my pinkies sticking out and some tea and crumpets on the sideboard next to me.

 

Oooh er you'll be speaking proper queens english next. :w00tx100:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the excuse the Foundation people gave and it simply isn't true. Search on the word "programming" in the Play Store and see all the hits you get. The real reason, IMO, is that the Foundation was never given the source code from Broadcom that was needed.

 

Actually the raspberry pi is fully open source hardware so I do not think that is the reason

 

The source is available from our new userland repository on GitHub. If you’re not familiar with the status of open source drivers on ARM SoCs this announcement may not seem like such a big deal, but it does actually mean that the BCM2835 used in the Raspberry Pi is the first ARM-based multimedia SoC with fully-functional, vendor-provided (as opposed to partial, reverse engineered) fully open-source drivers, and that Broadcom is the first vendor to open their mobile GPU drivers up in this way.

http://www.raspberry...-arm-userspace/

 

Broadcom open sourced all of their drivers back in 2010 starting with their wireless driver. http://thread.gmane....s.general/55418

 

I only knew that as two of my old laptops use the Broadcom driver that is now built into the kernel. I used to have ndiswrapper to install the window's driver in linux before they went open source.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the excuse the Foundation people gave and it simply isn't true. Search on the word "programming" in the Play Store and see all the hits you get. The real reason, IMO, is that the Foundation was never given the source code from Broadcom that was needed.

 

Actually the raspberry pi is fully open source hardware so I do not think that is the reason

 

The source is available from our new userland repository on GitHub. If you’re not familiar with the status of open source drivers on ARM SoCs this announcement may not seem like such a big deal, but it does actually mean that the BCM2835 used in the Raspberry Pi is the first ARM-based multimedia SoC with fully-functional, vendor-provided (as opposed to partial, reverse engineered) fully open-source drivers, and that Broadcom is the first vendor to open their mobile GPU drivers up in this way.

http://www.raspberry...-arm-userspace/

 

Broadcom open sourced all of their drivers back in 2010 starting with their wireless driver. http://thread.gmane....s.general/55418

 

I only knew that as two of my old laptops use the Broadcom driver that is now built into the kernel. I used to have ndiswrapper to install the window's driver in linux before they went open source.

This was posted on Jan 19,2015 stating the Pi does NOT run Android. And there is a difference between Broadcom releasing source code for drivers and doing so for the "blob" of an SoC. I do recall reading something a few months ago about them finally giving the Foundation access but that was long after the original release. That was also the reason given for not having hardware acceleration.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean by the "Blob" of an SoC?

 

Normally that would mean the drivers as in "binary blob". They specifically said in the quote that it is a fully functional, open sourced SoC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!

 

From your link about Lewmur:

Yep,

There is never going to be any support of an Android OS on Raspberry Pi

 

Gordon

 

Director of Software Engineering, Raspberry Pi.

--

Gordon Hollingworth PhD

Raspberry Pi - Director of Software Engineering

 

 

I do recall reading something a few months ago about them finally giving the Foundation access but that was long after the original release. That was also the reason given for not having hardware acceleration.

 

Perhaps it wasn't before but it sounds like it is now. I had been under the assumption that it was an open source computer but perhaps it wasn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mozilla preps Firefox OS for the Raspberry Pi

 

At the Mozilla Festival (MozFest) in the UK, held Oct. 24-26, Mozilla revealed a version of Firefox OS for the Raspberry Pi single board computer, and said it would “prepare and maintain a way for current Raspberry Pi board owners to download and flash their current hardware with Firefox OS for Raspberry Pi.” Initially, the main focus appears to be on robotics and media player applications.

 

Experimental :whistling:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mozilla preps Firefox OS for the Raspberry Pi

 

At the Mozilla Festival (MozFest) in the UK, held Oct. 24-26, Mozilla revealed a version of Firefox OS for the Raspberry Pi single board computer, and said it would “prepare and maintain a way for current Raspberry Pi board owners to download and flash their current hardware with Firefox OS for Raspberry Pi.” Initially, the main focus appears to be on robotics and media player applications.

 

Experimental :whistling:

So??? I thought "experimenting" was the very essence of the Pi.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is experimaental, then Arch users and then suicide jockeys like these,

 

Warnings posted on a Mozilla “Foxberry Pi” Page about instability and security risks were echoed on the main Mozilla developer page for the project, which calls the build PiFxOS, and warns in large letters that it’s “WILDLY INSECURE.”

 

:hysterical:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is experimaental, then Arch users and then suicide jockeys like these,

We Archers are not very experimental, we just like having the latest, stable versions of packages....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is experimaental, then Arch users and then suicide jockeys like these,

We Archers are not very experimental, we just like having the latest, stable versions of packages....

 

You proper Archers may not be but us barbarian archers just love to experiment. :tease:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bought 4 Raspberry Pi 2s for work last week. Playing with them now. I own a couple of B+ models; one was planned to be used in a Photo Booth project with the touch screen and Pi Camera and the second one I've been planning to test it as an Asterix VoIP gateway. I've got a B acting as a router for a test switch and another acting as my Air Print server for the house.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, very nice!! I plan on buying a Rpi 2 as soon as I can. I have the original B model (256) and the B+ model (512) now but haven't done much with them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, very nice!! I plan on buying a Rpi 2 as soon as I can. I have the original B model (256) and the B+ model (512) now but haven't done much with them.

I still think the Odroid C1 is a better buy for several reasons. One, is has UHF-1 support for SD cards, which at least doubles the card speed. Two, it has two separate USB controllers so you can copy from one external drive to another much faster and three it runs Android 4.4. Four, it has giga bit ethernet. Of course it also has an eMMC port, but that is a little too expensive, IMO, to go with a $35 board. Edited by lewmur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may have sold me on the specs alone lewmur and its also only $35.

 

I do not see the point of running Android on this though. 1gb of ram isn't really enough for Android nowadays. Maybe the old 4.4 but anything above that is too slow to really use. I have 5.0 on my 2012 Nexus 7(quad core with 1gb of ram) and I have to turn off all animations and use a custom rom for it to even be useable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I could, I would run pure Linux on my android devices. They are nice but it is nothing like running real Linux on them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still think the Odroid C1 is a better buy for several reasons. One, is has UHF-1 support for SD cards, which at least doubles the card speed. Two, it has two separate USB controllers so you can copy from one external drive to another much faster and three it runs Android 4.4. Four, it has giga bit ethernet. Of course it also has an eMMC port, but that is a little too expensive, IMO, to go with a $35 board.

 

I'm running a Samsung EVO 64GB MicroSDXC UHS-1 Class 10 card in my Pi B/B+/Pi 2 B without issues. The difference between the Odroid and Pi is whether you are natively developing with Android or Linux. Each has their niche. I do like the fact that the RPI 2 will be able to run Windows 10. :0

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may have sold me on the specs alone lewmur and its also only $35.

 

I do not see the point of running Android on this though. 1gb of ram isn't really enough for Android nowadays. Maybe the old 4.4 but anything above that is too slow to really use. I have 5.0 on my 2012 Nexus 7(quad core with 1gb of ram) and I have to turn off all animations and use a custom rom for it to even be useable

As I said, the C1 in running 4.4.2 and with the faster SD it runs fine. Of course, a lot depends on what screen res you choose. Anything over 1360 x 768 on my 40" monitor is wasted on my poor old eyes. I can't tell the difference between my Note 2014 with 2560 x 1600 and my old Galaxy Tab 3 with only 1024 x 600.

 

My main reason for wanting Android on my C1 is because I'm a big Nascar fan and watching Raceview on a 40" monitor is "totally awesome dude!!!" :clap: :clap:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My main reason for wanting Android on my C1 is because I'm a big Nascar fan and watching Raceview on a 40" monitor is "totally awesome dude!!!" :clap: :clap:

 

If that is your reason, just get a chromecast. https://www.google.c...ices/chromecast

 

Its also only $35 but you can push anything from your android device to the tv. Just click cast to push any app, game, youtube videos etc. you are viewing and it will show up on the big screen. My cousin bought one and it very simple to use if you already use android devices. The cast function is built into to Android 5.0 but is available via an app for older devices. It works fine on devices running Android 2.3 to 5.1.

 

You can also stream your own local media from your computer to your tv using chromecast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The difference between the Odroid and Pi is whether you are natively developing with Android or Linux.

 

In that case, the RPi2 will meet my needs just fine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My main reason for wanting Android on my C1 is because I'm a big Nascar fan and watching Raceview on a 40" monitor is "totally awesome dude!!!" :clap: :clap:

 

If that is your reason, just get a chromecast. https://www.google.c...ices/chromecast

 

Its also only $35 but you can push anything from your android device to the tv. Just click cast to push any app, game, youtube videos etc. you are viewing and it will show up on the big screen. My cousin bought one and it very simple to use if you already use android devices. The cast function is built into to Android 5.0 but is available via an app for older devices. It works fine on devices running Android 2.3 to 5.1.

 

You can also stream your own local media from your computer to your tv using chromecast.

Raceview isn't a "web" app and it won't run on Chromecast. And when I'm not using my C1 to run Android apps, I boot from my Linux SD card and use it as an FTP and NAS server. IOW, it isn't just a "streaming" device.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...