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The Raspberry Pi

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/07/26/hackers-tiny-spy-computers-aim-to-track-targets-around-entire-neighborhoods-and-cities/

 

Each CreepyDOL computer is built from a $25 tiny, single-board computers known as a Raspberry Pi and designed to be inconspicuously plugged into a power outlet anywhere with public Wifi; O’Connor suggests that the outlets in corners of coffee shops would make perfect hiding spots.

 

Creepiest of all, O’Connor has even designed the software to grab the user’s photo if they visit a certain dating site that lacks SSL encryption, adding that to the target’s profile.

 

“If every person on the planet can use this surveillance technology, I think we should start to design things not to leak information at every level,” he says. “You leave behind a trail that can be tracked not just by the NSA or a law enforcement agency, but by any kid in a basement with less than $500.”

 

Neat project. :whistling:

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Wow, great technology. ... but now we have to worry about that as well as government and corporate creepiness?

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yeah with a small portable power pack those units could be deployed almost anywhere and would be hard to find. A case of I Spy With My Little Pi I recon :devil:

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New issue of MagPi out:

Welcome to issue 16 of The MagPi.

It’s back… Skutter returns to the pages of The MagPi and this time it’s more sensitive! Stephen takes you in detail through expanding the number of inputs and outputs which can be controlled from your Raspberry Pi using I2C. This will allow you to add more sensors to your bot while driving the base unit.

 

In this issue we have some great hardware projects like Jorge’s PATOSS for monitoring his injured bird and we learn how to scroll text on the Pi Matrix.

We have more on connecting your Raspberry Pi to an Arduino in Tony’s great article on driving a liquid crystal display plus an amazing look into connecting your Raspberry Pi to Logi-Pi by Michael Jones.

 

After all that, we supplement the above with some fantastic software articles.

 

We are pleased to provide more on programming in Java by looking at control flow sentences, numbers, strings and booleans with Vladimir. For the cherry on the cake we have more from Bash gaffer tape and building and parsing XML in Python.

 

Hope you enjoy the biggest issue of The MagPi to date.

 

Ash Stone

 

http://www.themagpi....issue/issue-16/

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Raspberry Strudel: My Raspberry Pi in Austria

 

 

 

The Deal

 

When I first saw the deal advertised, I couldn't believe my eyes. An Austrian colocation facility, EDIS GmbH, was offering free Raspberry Pi colocation. Although I was a bit skeptical, I carefully read through the fine print, but it was pretty clear. If you set up an account, the EDIS GmbH folks would send you network information for your Raspberry Pi. Once you configured the network settings, you would send the Raspberry Pi along with the SD card, USB cable and optionally a small USB thumbdrive and they would rack it and provide 100Gb/month of traffic on a 100Mb connection. They even offered free remote power cycling of the server as long as you were fine with waiting 24–48 hours. I figured the worst that could happen is that I'm out a $35 Raspberry Pi and some Flash storage, so I signed up and set aside a Raspberry Pi, 8GB SD card and 32GB thumbdrive while I waited for my IP information.

 

 

http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/raspberry-strudel-my-raspberry-pi-austria

 

I'm not a network expert but this sounds like a sweet deal for anyone that could make use of the service. :breakfast:

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Interesting. :)

 

I am starting to think of all kinds of interesting uses for something like that.

 

Adam

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fascinating - that would be useful if, say, 1 in 10 neighbors each put one up, one could track inbound and outbound thieves... if others put up cameras... not only could you see those unsavory folks cutting through your neighborhood, but you'd have their cell phone mac, and the police could go from there.

 

why not? the gov't does it...

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Raspberry Pi Wireless Inventors Kit Review

 

 

RasWIK introduction

 

The Wireless Inventors Kit for the Raspberry Pi (RasWIK) is an exciting and affordable way to build your own wireless devices with the Raspberry Pi. The hardware comes preloaded with software and there are applications to run on your Pi. The RasWIK demonstrates that with our leading edge technology anyone (we do mean anyone) can build wireless sensors and actuators. You do not need huge experience, a degree or even any tools. We show you how to connect the devices you build to your Pi and even to “the Internet of Things” (IoT) with service providers such as Xively.

 

Super neat add-on for the Pi. :good2:

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Were up when I had a look. A$140 is not that bad a price. You could shave some of that and have some fun if you did it yourself though.

 

Quote sounds like Big Bang but I doubt it is. :shifty:

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http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/5048

 

We’ve talked before about how the camera board and the Model A are natural bedfellows. Whether you’re shooting a time lapse video or hollowing out a sweet, innocent teddy bear, the 256MB of RAM on the Model A is easily sufficient to run raspistill and raspivid, and the much lower power consumption gives you a lot more battery life for mobile applications. To allow more of you to have a play with this combination, we’ve got together with our partners to offer the two together for the bargain price of $40.

 

Cheap as chips.

 

http://store.raspberrypi.com/projects/nxengine

 

Doukutsu Monogatari (Cave Story) takes place within the cavernous interior of a floating island. The island is populated by Mimigas, a race of sentient, rabbit-like humanoids.

You awaken in the cave with no memory of how you came to be there. Through your explorations you discover a plot by the evil "Doctor" who intends to enslave the Mamigas and force them to fight for him in his bid to conquer the world.

This is really one of those games that can be considered a masterpiece of game design. There are so many wonderful and classic gaming elements here.

 

60 fps running on the Pi. it has to be worth a free download.

 

:breakfast:

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Wow, was there when I posted. Closed till the 18th. Confound it,that's the most unheard of thing I ever heard of! (10 internets prize if you can identify that reference. :) )

 

Sounds like Senator McCarthy to the press...yep! Verified here.

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Sounds like Senator McCarthy to the press...yep! Verified here.

Yep he said the original. My version was King Leonardo:

rchj.jpg

5 internets consolation prize. :)

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http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/news/raspberry-pi-sells-two-million-units

 

On its first anniversary, or near enough, the Raspberry Pi hit its one millionth sale. News also broke in the summer that 1.5 million had been sold, a million of which had been manufactured in the UK. So it comes as a pleasant surprise to hear that the Raspberry Pi has broken the magic two million mark a full three months before its second birthday.

 

:Hammys_pint:

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Two years ago today*, the Raspberry Pi Model B went on sale, selling 100,000 units on the first day. Since then, over 2.5 million Raspberry Pis have found homes with hobbyists, children and professional engineers around the world.

 

The success of the Pi has allowed us to make substantial financial contributions to a range of open-source projects, including XBMC, libav, PyPy, Pixman, Wayland/Weston, Squeak, Scratch and WebKit, and we are continuing to sponsor projects like these. But it’s always felt like we have a piece of unfinished business.

 

 

 

But

 

Earlier today, Broadcom announced the release of full documentation for the VideoCore IV graphics core, and a complete source release of the graphics stack under a 3-clause BSD license. The source release targets the BCM21553 cellphone chip, but it should be reasonably straightforward to port this to the BCM2835, allowing access to the graphics core without using the blob. As an incentive to do this work, we will pay a bounty of $10,000 to the first person to demonstrate to us satisfactorily that they can successfully run Quake III at a playable framerate on Raspberry Pi using these drivers. This competition is open worldwide, and you can find competition rules here which describe what you have to do, and how to enter.

 

http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/6299

 

That is a decent amount of mulah :clap:

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I'm thinking of putting me name down for a pre order of the MoPi. It would be most useful for me. :breakfast:

Edited by abarbarian

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Raspberry Pi gains Wolfson HD audio card

 

The Wolfson Audio Card extends and enhances the Linux-ready Raspberry Pi’s audio features beyond its native HDMI output with onboard HD audio and a variety of interfaces. Raspberry Pi manufacturer Premier Farnell has the exclusive contract for the add-on, and is distributing it through its subsidiaries, including Newark Element14 in North America, Farnell Element14 in Europe, CPC in the UK, and Element14 in Asia Pacific. The Wolfson Audio Card sells for $33.62 and works with Raspberry Pi Rev2 Model A or B single board computers that include P5 pads for connecting the daughtercard.

 

Don't you just love Pi's. The older they get the better they become. :breakfast:

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Yes, and they certainly needed a better audio card. ;) It was one of their weak points before.

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In the normal configuration though, a good sound card was not needed. Audio would go out the HDMI port. No high quality DAC really needed. I'm surprised analog outputs are even on the device at all!

 

Adam

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In the normal configuration though, a good sound card was not needed. Audio would go out the HDMI port. No high quality DAC really needed. I'm surprised analog outputs are even on the device at all!

 

Adam

 

Don't forget the Pi was originally designed as a very accessible computer for as wide a user group as possible. That is why it has connectors for old style tv's as well as analogue connectors. An really it was aimed at educational use not as a cheap media player etc. :shifty:

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