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Guest Paracelsus

Thanks for the links, Pluka! You Aussies seem to have an enviable system for Aquaculture. We do that here with Catfish and Salmon... But I'm not sure if there's any "Farm Raised" Mud Bugs yet.Temmu a/o Lewmur could correct me on this... as most of the Crayfish in the US come from Luzanna (Louisiana, with a Cajun drawl).The only thing I find curious is that your versions apparently have the head and tail reversed :hmm:Must be an "Antipode" thang. :whistling:BTW - I tried the extra brew remedy on the 3rd. Just left a bitter taste in my mouth. :"> :D :'(

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Thanks for the links, Pluka!  You Aussies seem to have an enviable system for Aquaculture.  We do that here with Catfish and Salmon... But I'm not sure if there's any "Farm Raised" Mud Bugs yet.Temmu a/o Lewmur could correct me on this... as most of the Crayfish in the US come from Luzanna (Louisiana, with a Cajun drawl).The only thing I find curious is that your versions apparently have the head and tail reversed  :hmm:Must be an "Antipode" thang. :whistling:BTW -  I tried the extra brew remedy on the 3rd.  Just left a bitter taste in my mouth. :'(  <_<  :P
A good percentage of Louisiana crayfish are "farm raised." The "farmers" actually "rotate their crops" between rice and crayfish. Each year, we here in the N.O. area, wait impatiently for the "Bell River" crop to be "harvested." They are not only the best crayfish, but the price drops signicantly from the "wild harvest."
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Guest Paracelsus

Time to pop this thread back to the top :PWe had our R&D dept. Thanksgiving "Pot Luck" lunch last Friday, and I made a big batch of Beef Stroganoff, which I hadn't made for a while. Naturally...LabRat kept pestering me to do some experimenting. Kept saying... "You never use a recipe anyway". Well..."A little bit of This... And a little bit of That" later, and... :devil: OMG!!! :devil: ... This is waaaaaaaaaaaaaay too good for the clowns I work with. :ph34r: But I took it in anyway.I'm going to try and get this one codified (something I rarely do) this weekend and will post it when it's ready for publication.

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This was one of the first Road Kill recipes I found on the net. :devil: Ted's Texas Road Kill Chilli.Copyright Ted Rockwell ©19924 lb. fresh road-kill. 1 tsp. black pepper.2 beers or 750ml zinfindel. 1-3 tsps. oregano.2 Jalapeno peppers (chopped). 1 tsp. cumin powder.2-4 tbs. chilli powder. 1 tsp. salt.4 cloves crushed garlic. 1 16 oz. can Cantadina tomato sauce.1 tbs. finely chopped green onions. 2 tsb. chopped bell pepper.Grind up 4 pounds of fresh road-kill. (Note: sometimes, due to the condition of the road-kill, grinding up may not be necessary). Just about anything is acceptable (Armadillo, rabbit, possum, chicken, unidentified...), (in other countries substitute your local critter) but stay away from skunks since their odoriferousnous may have a negative effect on the final result. If you live in an area where there's not much highway traffic, or where urbanisation has scared off all the critters and your neighbours keep their pets indoors, then you can use (all) the following meat as a substitute: 2 lb. ground beef (chilli grind).1 lb. venison (chilli grind) .. pork is ok.1 lb. ground Italian sausage.12 oz. Mexican chorrizo sausage.Mix all the meat in a large kettle. If using the "substitute" ingredients above, then cut open the chorrizo wrapping and squeeze out the contents into the mixture of the 4 lb. of other meats. Brown the meat, stirring occasionally to mix well. Once the meat has browned, add the tomato sauce, beer (or wine) and all of the seasonings. It is a good idea at this early juncture to use only half of the chilli pepper and oregano and reserve the rest until later so that you can season to your taste. Cook over low-medium heat for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking, then reduce heat to low and cover. Cook covered for 1 hour, stirring from time to time. Sample for taste, increase seasoning as desired, and cook on low for another hour, stirring occasionally. Sample again and add additional cumin, chilli pepper, oregano, Jalapenos or critters to suit your taste; turn off heat and place in the refrigerator over night. Reheat on the following day and serve. For an especially tasty presentation, serve up in bowls and sprinkle the top with chopped white onions and shredded Monterey Jack and cheddar cheeses. Feeds 6 to 8. Enjoy! :ph34r:

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Guest Paracelsus

So tell me, Pluka...What substitutes well for an Armadillo in the land of Antipodes??Cane Toads, Perhaps? :happyroll:Oops! That right... They're poisonous, aren't they? :happyrollsick:Locusts, then? Mice?Inquiring Minds Want to KnowBTW....Are you subtly intimating that my Beef Stroganoff is akin to Road Kill Chili :ph34r:

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So tell me, Pluka...What substitutes well for an Armadillo in land of Antipodes??Cane Toads, Perhaps :happyroll:Oops!  That right... They're poisonous, aren't they? :happyrollsick:Locusts, then?  Mice?Inquiring Minds Want to KnowBTW....Are you subtly intimating that my Beef Stroganoff is akin to Road Kill Chili :P
We have Kangaroo's, Wallabies, Possums in profusion as road kill. If you get really lucky you can find a fresh Bullamacow (Pidjin English for cattle). :P Beef Stroganoff is a very nice meal known locally as Beef Strangled Horse :)
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Guest Paracelsus

My mistake.I thought 'roos and Wallabies were protected.You don't have to make out an incident report if you hit one?? Still permissible to take 'em home for the Chili Pot??Of course...In the latter case, no one will know you hit one in the first place :hmm:I guess that makes sense.

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We have Kangaroo's,  Wallabies, Possums in profusion as road kill. If you get really lucky you can find a fresh Bullamacow  :thumbsup:
WoW!Critter-Fritter'sYummmmeeeeeeeee!:happyrollsick: :D :w00tx100: :bounce:
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Brannigan’s Creek Muddy Dip.½ kgs. Mud Crab Meat. ½ kgs. Cream Cheese. Juice of 1 Lemon. ½ packet Thai Curry Paste. 1 tablespoons Chilli Sauce. 1 tablespoons Crushed Garlic. Garlic bread. Whip Cream Cheese up with 3 tablespoons of Crab juice, then mix in other ingredients.Add Crab meat and mix together. Put in baking dish and bake in oven at 320º for 30 minutes or until bubbly. Serve hot with Garlic bread. B) A Queensland Mud Crab (1.7 kg) muddie_2.jpg

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Guest Paracelsus

Mebby...But a crab like that would make anybody look good. :thumbsup:Now...If the Invertebrate Zoölogy I studied 30 years ago serves me correctly...A "broad tail" on a crab indicates a female. Hopefully, she had a chance to breed before you made dip outta her.I wonder if crab roe tastes as good as lobster roe? :rolleyes:

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Hopefully, she had a chance to breed before you made dip outta her.
It's (was) a male crab with a narrow abdominal flap. :rolleyes: Female crabs have a broader abdominal flap and are protected in Queensland. :D
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Guest Paracelsus

Ah! Well now...That's different. Of course...Having been raised on the US East Coast, I'm most familiar with the Blue CrabThere's nothing like a lightly breaded, sautéed in butter, "Soft Shell Sandwich" ;) :drooling:Right, Julia? ;)EDIT - I've removed the link for the SSS recipe... I didn't realize how many cookies that site wants to set. I don't think anyone owns this recipe... But I will credit this one to www.foodnetwork.com "Cooking Live with Sarah Moulton". Search for "Soft Shell" and you'll find it.

Home > RecipesSoft-Shell Crabs SandwichesRecipes courtesy Gourmet MagazineShow: Cooking LiveEpisode:  Soft Shell Crabs Cook AlongRecipe SummaryYield: 6 servingsRatings and ReviewsUser Rating: 4 StarsRate Recipe Read Reviews Ratings & Reviews FAQ 6 small soft-shell crabs, cleanedSalt and pepper1 cup buttermilk1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning1 cup flour1/2 teaspoon cayenne2 tablespoons unsalted butter for pan frying3 tablespoons olive oil for pan fryingSeason the buttermilk with salt, pepper and Old Bay seasoning. Place crabs in the buttermilk mixture. Let the crabs marinate covered and chilled, for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours. Remove and pat dry. In a bowl, mix together the flour, cayenne and salt and pepper to taste. Dredge the crab in the flour, shaking off excess. Choose a heavy frying pan (or pans) that will hold all the crabs in one layer without crowding. Place the pans over moderately high heat and add butter and oil to create a thin layer (about 1/4-inch) in each pan. After the foam subsides, add the floured crabs. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the crabs are golden brown on the underside. Turn the crabs over. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the other side is golden brown. Transfer them to paper towels to drain briefly.6 English muffins1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter2 tablespoons lemon juice2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced1 tablespoon minced shallotSalt and pepperHave ready English muffins, split in half and flattened with a rolling pin. In a small saucepan combine unsalted butter, lemon juice and parsley, shallot, and salt and pepper to taste, heat the mixture over moderately low heat, stirring until the butter is just melted and reserve it. Brush muffins with herbed butter and place on griddle. Heat for 3 to 5 minutes, remove and place 1 crab between 2 muffin halves.
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I had been away from New York City for several years and found myself there for a class that my then company had sent me to. This was in the 80's. I don't remeber the class, don't remember what company sent me, but boy do I remember wandering around Little Italy and finding a family style Italian restaurant. I ordered the soft shell crabs (:P) and like Proust with his Madelines, the memories of childhood came back. My aunt used to make these from fresh caught crabs. She lived on Eastern Long Island, when it was a sparsely populated area. We used to vist her every so often. It was she who taught my mother and her other sisters to cook. But it was she who was the best of them all. She would bread the crabs and serve them with a little tomato sauce.Well, Proust gave you an entire book. You only had to read this.

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Guest Paracelsus
She would bread the crabs and serve them with a little tomato sauce.
Yep! They don't need much extra, do they?The one addition I might add to any Soft Shell recipe is little slather with a mild, buttery, cheese... Like Brie or Camembert. B) :whistling:I fell in love with crab as a teen, after we'd moved from western Pennsylvania to south Jersey. My Mother's brother had a house at the shore in Avalon. Up 'til then... the only seafood I would eat was french fried shrimp and fish sticks. Lobster is good...But once I had a taste of fresh crab...I was hooked!!I'll take most any kind of crab over lobster, any day! :)
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Here's a drink recipe or two for the festive season...WARNING this stuff is deceptive and goes down to easy. :wacko:Yo Ho Ho Shake2 to 3 cups of a quality chocolate ice cream (Cadbury's)½ to 1 cup of milk (not low fat or skim)3 - 4 tablespoons of Jamaican Rum (Captain Morgan)Put all ingredients into a blender, blend till smooth.ole.gifAnd my favourite is this one...Aussie BlissSome cool, cool shade...one never ending, long... oh so cold beer. ;)

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Guest Paracelsus

Thanks a lot! :pirate:I don't think I'm ready to pay for overnight shipping from the UKI usually like to make my own. But when I'm lazy...I go for either Häagen-Dazs or Ben & Jerry :thumbsup:There use to be another good one called Fusen Gladje... But they just kind of disappeared about 10 years ago. I've never know what happen to them ;)

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Guest Paracelsus

Today is our dept. Christmas Pot Luck Lunch. I had the urge to cook again, and the recent talk about crab inspired me to do something unusual...Risotto SupremoIngredients

  • Brown & Wild Rice
  • Shrimp (100-150 count)
  • Crab (real for yourself, family & friends; Artificial for co-workers)
  • Portobello & Button Mushrooms
  • Red Onion
  • Toasted Pignoli
  • Grated Romano Cheese (get the good stuff in the refrigerated section)
  • Roasted Garlic
  • Chicken Broth
  • Chardonnay
  • Olive Oil
  • Unsalted Butter
  • Basil
  • Marjoram
  • Thyme
  • Cummin (toasted, then ground)
  • Salt
  • Cracked Pepper

I can't give any quantities, 'cause like most of what I cook...This was entirely Stream-of-Consciousness ;)I will however, update this post with some procedure when I get a chance.By the way...It turned out purdy dern good.

Edited by Paracelsus
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