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I figure any moron can cook a basic chicken or veal parm or marsala, a few basic breads, some sauces, etc., so I'm going to go with a little more esoteric, but not bizarre.I live in S. Florida and I'm outside a lot. I used to take a big jug of water to the golf course because they don't supply enough watering holes on the course. I don't mean beer girls, because there are always plenty of them, but I got tired of paying $2 or so for a can of Gatorade on the course and I think they are about $2 a quart at the grocery store.I did a lot of research and came up with a Gatorade substitute that will cost you about $0.35 for 2 quarts - the vast majority of that is the $0.20 for the Kool Aid.Gatorade (2 quarts)2 quarts water (duh)1 package unsweetened Kool Aid - or other soft drink powder - I'm partial to lemonade flavor but orange isn't bad1/2 cup sugar - you can, of course, vary this, but after researching it I found that this is the precise amount of sugar in real Gatorade3/4 teaspoons Morton Lite Salt - here's the potassium that Gatorade touts so highly. This is basically 1/2 sodium chloride (basic table salt, which you need if you perspire) and 1/2 potassium choloride. At this ratio, $1 will make about 100 gallons of Gatorade. Of course, you could substitute another similar product.If you have kids they will probably still whine for Real Coke but if you're going outdoors in the summer this makes it.

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Great stuff NRD i love SOS also and my wife along with quite a few others i am sure also makes it as sausage gravy for pancakes and another great variety is hamburger gravy which is my personal favorite .
sausage gravy on pancakes? Now that is a new one for me. Man I wish tomorrow was Sunday, hehe I'd love to try that.....Weekends are the only time I actually make a real breakfast.
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Is that the Gatorade? If you're going to drink it over ice you probably need to adjust it (just like real Gatorade - I would wager that football teams use the powdered version and allow for ice dilution) I just make in a 2 qt thermos.. Also note that the lite salt is going to make it taste just as bad as the real thing.

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I am going to have to show my husband the gatorade recipe. We buy gatorade in the tubs of powdered mix. I am not sure this would be any cheaper but it is interesting. Before long runs I sometimes have to make the gatorade run and go out and place gatorade and water along the route so they have something to drink every few miles. I should buy stock in gatorade we buy so much of it. B) Speaking of breakfast for supper, my hubby makes killer omelets when he is too "lazy" to cook. B) I'll take one of those any day. I just try to convince him that I really don't need 3 eggs every time.

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Speaking of breakfast for supper, my hubby makes killer omelets when he is too "lazy" to cook. B)  I'll take one of those any day.  I just try to convince him that I really don't need 3 eggs every time.
I like to make "refrigerator omelets." Whatevers is in the refrigerator goes into the omelet. Good way to get rid of "leftovers" before they spoil!
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That sounds good, George!The thing I like about leftovers is that they always seem to taste better. Probably because all the flavours and seasonings have had time to blend together. Like home-made Tomato Sauce... the following week :thumbsup:My favorite for all kinds of leftovers is a Frittata :thumbsup: ...Which is kind of like a quiche, without the crust.

Now about chili....beans or no?
I'll have a few words about Chili later :D
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Speaking of breakfast for supper, my hubby makes killer omelets when he is too "lazy" to cook. :D  I'll take one of those any day.  I just try to convince him that I really don't need 3 eggs every time.
Sounds like me, I'm always being told 2 eggs are plenty. I wind up getting the extra. :thumbsup: :devil:The latest omelet kick here has been sauted spinach (fresh if possible), onions, and dill in a butter/olive oil mix with feta cheese added at the end (you don't want it melted completely) all stuffed in the omelet.
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CHILI CON CARNE !!!!!in  english    =  peppers and meat  that is all . nothing more and its deliciousCHILI BEANS in english  =  chili con carne with beans added and it is also delicious End of Lesson
Utt-Ohh!!, George...You've done it now!! :oYou've lit the fuse on one of the most contentious questions in the Culinary World :ph34r:I beg to differ with your interpretation...But this shall have to wait until I get home later :thumbsup:
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FRENCH SILK PIE
WebbPA, you may very well end up my most admired, respected, and bestest friend for life if this is the same receipe for French Silk Pie I had growing up. I've tried different receipes over the years but never found a match. This may be it. As I recall, it is so rich, a normal person can only eat a very small piece at a time. Then again, if you have a monsterous sweet tooth, you can probably handle two. :whistling:
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For 1 square (1 ounce) of unsweetened chocolate substitute:3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (your general off the shelf Hershey's Cocoa Powder) and1 tablespoon butter
yes, my mom did that.as to chilie, technically, it's without beans, but to feed 4 kids, i add red beans.
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One of the things I have missed most about not eating red meat is chili, I always loved it, beans or no beans. Hot chili with a hot roll on a cold day perfect.

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'Cmon people! I'm waiting for new recipes!! I guess I'll have to post one to get one in return. So here is an easy one for "Cajun Roasted Pecans."1/2 pound of pecan halves1/4 stick of butter2 tablespoons of *Lea & Perrin's Sauce. (Another misnomer. I only put that size spoon on the table if I'm serving soup!)Tony Chacere's Original Creole Seasoning. (You'll notice I use this a lot)Place butter and L & P in a cup and melt in the microwave. Place nuts in 12" roasting pan and pour the butter and sauce over them. Mix well to evenly coat the nuts and then spread them out. (If can't spread them one nut deep, use a larger pan!!) Sprinkle creole seasoning over nuts to taste. (a lot) Place in the oven on the middle rack @ 225 degrees. Roast for 2 & 1/2 hrs, turning once every 1/2 hr. Let cool to room temp before serving. (If you're like me, put them in a zip bag and cool them in the freezer so you don't have to wait so long.)*Worstershire sauce can be used by yankees that don't have the real thing.

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You want a recipe. Here is one of my daughter's specialties. She sautes the veggies before preparing everything. It really makes a big difference:Spinach and Mushroom Lasagna Roll-ups with Gorgonzola Cream Sauce16 cremini caps, cleaned with a damp towel and finely chopped1 small yellow-skinned onion, finely chopped.2 cloves garlic, minced2 tablespoons (2 turns around the pan) extra-virgin olive oil1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach, defrosted and squeezed drySalt and pepper1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg or the equivalent of freshly grated2 cups part skim ricotta8 curly edge lasagna noodles, cooked to al dented (12 to 14 minutes)1 cup fat free chicken broth8 ounces Gorgonzola, crumbled1/2 cup (3 turns around the pan) heavy cream1 to 1.5 cups shredded mozzarellaIn a medium skillet over moderate heat, saute mushrooms, chopped onions,and garlic in oil until the mushrooms darken and give off their juicesand the onions are tender - about 7 or 8 minutes. Season with salt andpepper.Add dry chopped spinach to the pan and heat through for one minute. Adjust seasonings with salt, pepper, and a little nutmeg. Add ricottaand stir into the mixture to heat the cheese through, then one minutelonger. Remove the pan from the heat abut leave in the warm skillet.Heat the broth in a small pan over moderate heat. Melt the Gorgonzolainto the broth and bring the liquid to a bubble. Stir in the cream andthicken the sauce about 2 minutes.Place cooked lasagna noodles on a large work surface or cutting board. spread the lasagna noodles with a layer of spinach-mushroom filling. Roll up the pasta and arrange the 8 bundles in a shallow casseroledish. Pour warm sauce over roll-ups and top with mozzarella. Place thedish under the boiler to melt the cheese. Serves 8.

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Yummy-YummyJulia!!Anything with Mushrooms & Cheese get bumped up on my list of recipes to try. But... Experimenter that I am... I may try substituting the Spinach with Kale or Swiss Chard :thumbsup:I love Spinach...But it's fun to try new things

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the only argument i have is whether or not there are any beans in chili con carne .
OK, George...All I'll say for the moment is that "con carne" is Spanish for "with meat". Ergo...If there is chili with meat... there must be chili without meat..Per se... "Chili"... Used in reference to the "dish", has a meaning beyond the Peppers (fresh, dried, or ground) used in preparation.
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Chilli Sans Carne There are lots of different ways of doing this. As long as you've got chillies, red kidney beans and no meat in it, I reckon you can call it 'Chilli Sans carne'. Here's one of my versions. I usually serve this with guacamole, a simple salsa made of chopped tomatoes and green coriander and maybe some lettuce leaves and plain yoghurt. Taco shells really finish it offIngredients500 - 700 g cooked red kidney beans2 potatoes2 tomatoes1 red or green sweet pepper1 onion6 or 7 shelled walnuts3 - 4 cloves of garlicHalf a tsp. each of red chilli powder and ground cumin1 green chilliOilSaltFinely chop the onion, pepper, tomatoes, chilli and walnuts. Cut the potatoes into 1 cm cubes.Fry the onions until they start to brown, then throw in the peppers, walnuts, potatoes, ground spices, chilli and crushed garlic. Stir and fry for another 2 or 3 minutes before adding the tomatoes, beans and salt. Stir, put a lid on the pan and cook for 10 minutes.

Edited by Plukaduk
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Going back to the topic of Sweetbreads...My sister and her husband from Atlanta stopped over for a weekend on Sept.10, after a trade show my b-i-L, Doug, had in Dallas. Well... there ain't much to do in Denton in early Sept. (thank goodness we had a "cool" spell while they were here), so we spent Saturday cruising around Lake Ray Roberts.On the way back home, I took them to Clark's Outpost in Tioga (childhood stomping grounds of Gene Autry) for dinner. Clark's always gets rated highly in reviews of the best barbecue joints in Texas. They've changed the menu a bit from the last time I was there, and it was interesting to see that they now offered "Lamb Fries" as either an appetizer or entrée.We decided to get the large appetizer order for starters. Doug said he'd had them before, but Marianne didn't know what they were. We said we weren't going to tell her until she tried one and decided if she liked it or not. Fortunately...These were well prepared and were quite tender with a mild flavour. We all had a good laugh as Doug, in his best, gentlemanly, north Georgia drawl, tried to explain the origins of Lamb Fries.As we enjoyed our main course of Ribs; Brisket and Smoked Sausage... Three young couples came in as a group and were seated by us. As they looked over the menu, one young lady asked; "What are Lamb Fries??". Naturally we burst out laughing, as did the tree guys in their group. Somewhat abashed, the lady, looking in our direction, asked what was so funny. To which Doug replied..."I'm sorry. But not having made your acquaintance... I believe it would be inappropriate for me to relate the origins of this particular delicacy." This provoked a response from one of the three young men, still barely controlling their laughter... "Don't you mean... tes-ticular delicacy?" B) B)

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I assume this is the same as Rocky Mountain Oysters???? Never heard them go by this name despite hearing of a number of names. Never cared to try them either. B)

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George=:D :rolleyes:

I assume this is the same as Rocky Mountain Oysters???? Never heard them go by this name despite hearing of a number of names. Never cared to try them either.
While George seems to have provided a veritable Thesaurus of euphemisms for these tasty (testy?) treats :harhar: ....I believe the major distinction between "Rocky Mountain Oysters" and "Lamb Fries" pertains to what type of animal they originally came from. Lamb is fairly obvious. I may be mistaken, but I think that RYO's are generally Bovine in origin.But I've never understood how people can be squeamish about something they haven't even tasted... Simply because of what it is. Or even worse...Try it and like it... and then get ill when they find out what it is. :hmm:Personally...I find the thought of eating raw shellfish far more revolting than sweetbreads. (And I LOVE raw shellfish)One anecdote I forgot in my yarn above. When we placed our order for the appetizer... Doug teased the waitress that she better make sure the chef plates an EVEN number! :D
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:D :huh: Welllll... although I have never partaken of RMOs myself, I would give it the benifit of the chance, considering some of the "delicasies" (used loosely) that I have sampled in various countries I visitied while floating around the ocean. Now domestically, that ox tail stew I mentioned furthere back that my Dad made was mighty tastey (although I really think it was bovine tail) and beef tongue was equally good, after a sufficient amount of boiling was done ... and battered and fried jumbo shrimp .. ummmm so good.
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... I would give it the benifit of the chance, considering some of the "delicasies" (used loosely) that I have sampled in various countries I visitied while floating around the ocean.
Now THAT'S the proper attitude! :thumbsup:I lost my squeamishness about "food" as an undergrad. Between Invertebrate Zoölogy; Entomology & Marine Phycology we sampled some fairly exotic items.Now... I pretty much eat anything that doesn't fight back when I poke it with a fork :huh: (At least once)
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But I've never understood how people can be squeamish about something they haven't even tasted... Simply because of what it is.  Or even worse...Try it and like it... and then get ill when they find out what it is. :huh:
Another thing that really stuns me is the old "I don't like it" when they've never actually tried it. I get this all the time. I got into a bit of a tiff with a family member who claimed to "not like" fried squid (aka calamari). I asked if they ever tried squid, their response was "No, but I know I won't like it"After a good deal of haranguing, the person in question tasted and now LOVES squid, especially the tentacles (arguably the best part!!). Personally, I'm willing to try ANYTHING at least once, and will usually give most dishes two chances. Variety is the spice of life, afterall. :D
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Another thing that really stuns me is the old "I don't like it" when they've never actually tried it. I get this all the time. I got into a bit of a tiff with a family member who claimed to "not like" fried squid (aka calamari). I asked if they ever tried squid, their response was "No, but I know I won't like it"After a good deal of haranguing, the person in question tasted and now LOVES squid, especially the tentacles (arguably the best part!!). Personally, I'm willing to try ANYTHING at least once, and will usually give most dishes at two chances.  Variety is the spice of life, afterall.  :huh:
Ah, the perfect place to reply with a poem:
rattlesnake meat A gourmet once challenged me to eat A tiny bit of rattlesnake meat. Remarking don't look horror-stricken You'll find it tastes a lot like chicken. It did. Now chicken I cannot eat Because it tastes like rattlesnake meat.  - Ogden Nash
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I'm not sure why I want to know, but how many turkeys have to give up hope of progeny before one can make a meal of these?
HEHE...I just did a bit of searching and I don't think it would take as many Turkeys as you think. Lets just say, we have more in common with Turkeys than I previously thought. :lol: :lol:
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oh my! :o i eat raw seafood - octopus, squid, oysters (as many as i can get fresh...) & sushi...however, just the thought of eating some animals privates... :devil: :lol: :P :lol: :lol: :o

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:lol: :P :lol: Thet can't be to private ... there open to the world to see .. imagine a bull wearing a pair of Wranglers ... :devil: :lol: I had raw Octopi once and only once...bland taste, but, IMHO, I could have chewed on that until the cows came in and it still have been like shoe leather. Smoked/fried oysters I can do, tried raw once, was not impressed with the gritty stuff I encountered, fried battered squid aka calimari,,, is good.. prefer cervechi (spell ck) to sushi any day but to each their own ....
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