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Paracelsus......I was googling about scrapple and this paella ... wanted to see what the fixins' were in it and here are to more web sites for that paella pan and not at 165.00 either.www.CreativeCookware.com and www.mysoncorp.comscrapple is quite the concoction of pieces an parts ..... and some bodacious prices from that web site you put up ... and in quanties to large for my tiny motorhome refrigerator... but ... after some of the fine cusine I had in the far east ... it would probably go down without a hitch.... the paella ... looks to be fairly good too.... I do somewhat like sea food ... especially them crustecans (sp c k) ...

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Guest Paracelsus
scrapple is quite the concoction of pieces an parts ..... and some bodacious prices from that web site you put up
It's all goodferya, Dude! And the price at Habbersett includes shipping! Not bad, really. And like any regional, hard to get, delicacy on the Internet...When ya gotta have it?? Ya Gotta HAVE it!! :'( :( :happyrollsick:(Thanks for additional 'sites)
no offense intended Paracelsus
None taken, buddy! (That's what the wink was for)I'm probably one of the most "un-offendable" people in the world. Sixth of eight kids. I learned to take it before I could stand :happyroll: I got skin thicker than a Rhinoceros :happyrollsick: . Besides...I don't give a #^*@ what anybody thinks. :happyrollsick: :happyrollsick: :happyroll:
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"Rocky Mountain Oysters" is another euphemism ;)Brains can be called Sweetbreads as well.  I think, like has been said about other things, terms are kind of regional.  Regardless...I love organ meats of all kinds.  I've not had brains...But just about everything else.Kidneys & Rice has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid.Question.Why are these things called "Sweetbreads" if they come from a mammal...And "Giblets" if they come from Poultry?? :hmm:
How about Hogshead Cheese? No cheese in it at all.
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How about Hogshead Cheese?  No cheese in it at all.
Ah!, Yes...Just lots of "Tasty Bits" thrown together with a binder to keep them in place when sliced. But wait!!...That's almost the same description for Scrapple!! ;) :thumbsup:
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I figured... As I'm preparing Experiment #2 for tomorrow... That this would be a good place to republish the results of Experiment #1, from the Bacon-Burger-Dog thread.BBD Experiment #1Main Components:Johnsonville BratwürstGround SirloinHickory Smoked Bacon (thick cut)Preparation:A) Hamburger2 lbs ground Sirloin1 cup Italian bread crumbs½ cup grated Romano cheese6 Tbs fresh cracked Pepper4 Tbs (heaping) minced Roasted Garlic3 Tbs crushed Sage½ bottle beer (ZiegenBock for me!)¼ cup Worcestershire sauceSeveral dashes of TabascoMix the above thoroughly into the hamburger, cover, and allow to marinade for several hours (overnight is better)B ) BratwürstPoach the Brats in beer and then allow to cool in the liquid. When the beer is nearly room temp., remove Brats and drain on paper towels.Cooking:Mold a layer of the hamburger around the Brats and then spiral wrap a couple strips of bacon around them.Grill slowly on low heat at first, turning every few minutes, to make certain the hamburger gets cooked through and evenly. Then move to a hotter area (or lower the grill) and allow the bacon to char a bit (if you like bacon more crispy).Eating:In this experiment, I found the final product a wee bit too large to adequately handle and still be able to add some goodies... So I ended up splitting them lengthwise and putting one half to a large roll.Condiments of choice in this test were...Sauerkraut; Dill Pickle relish; spicy brown Mustard; chopped Red OnionThis may all sound like a lot of work... But I can assure you the results are truly Awesome!!

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NEVER EVER PICK UP BRATWURST WITH A FORK OR ANY OTHER OBJECT/TOOL/IMPLEMENT THAT COULD POSSIBLY PIERCE THE OUTER SKIN .
EXCELLENT point, George!I just kinda took that for granted, as it is a Mortal Sin to begin with! :D B) B)
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Ah!, Yes...Just lots of "Tasty Bits" thrown together with a binder to keep them in place when sliced.  But wait!!...That's almost the same description for Scrapple!! :P  :hmm:
Don't know. I've only had scrapple once. Came out of a can and was fried. Can you eat scrapple on a Ritz cracker with a dash of Tobasco?
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Don't know.  I've only had scrapple once.  Came out of a can and was fried. Can you eat scrapple on a Ritz cracker with a dash of Tobasco?
YIKES!!!I have no idea what that was... But I can assure you it was not Scrapple. Sounds more like Spam (the original, I mean), or some other canned meat.Scrapple would never come in a can, to my knowledge. And if it did...I wouldn't eat it. :thumbsdown: But then...I'm a Scrapple devotée. It has to be homemade, or Habbersett.I suppose one could eat Scrapple uncooked, since the meat in it has already been cooked. But I don't think it would taste nearly as good as when slow fried. (See some of the earlier posts in this thread). Once done, I bet it would go nicely on a Ritz with Tabasco. After all..."Everything's Better When it Sits on a Ritz" :whistling: Tabasco is alway good, likewise. About one the few things I make that doesn't have at least a dash (usually more) of Tabasco (I'm currently partial to the Green Pepper Sauce) is Ice Cream.
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l..."Everything's Better When it Sits on a Ritz" :thumbsdown:  Tabasco is alway good, likewise.  About one the few things I make that doesn't have at least a dash (usually more) of Tabasco (I'm currently partial to the Green Pepper Sauce) is Ice Cream.
What have you got against Ice Cream?
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Here's the greatest recipe ever for Crabmeat Au Gratin'First load your crab nets and 'melt into your Lafite Skiff and hook your skff to your pickup. Drive to the Bonnabel boat launch on Lake Pontchartrain and proceed to catch a bushel or so of crabs. Be sure to throw back any crabs where the shell is smaller than your hand.As soon as you get back home, call a bunch of people over for a crab picking party. (Be sure to tell them to bring their own beer. You're just providing the crabs.)Get out your Zatarain's crab-boil and your big crab pot and proceed to boil all of the crabs. Then it's time for the picking party to begin. The thing about a picking party is that the guest get to all of the crab *EXCEPT FOR THE BACKFIN CLAW MEET.* That gets reserved for the Au Gratin.As soon as your hangover from the picking partly clears, you can proceed with the rest of the dish.Rest of the dish:Roast one large red bell pepper under the broiler. (Why they call this roasting instead of broiling is the subject of another post.) Peel and chop the pepper.Finely chop 'half-a-bunch of green onions.Open the carton of chopped mushrooms you already bought.Shread a cup of mild cheddar cheese, one of Swiss and a half of Parmasean and mix them in a plastic bag.Make a cup of breadcrumbs from that stale po-boy bread you have hangin round.In your largest skillet (wrought-iron I hope) melt 1/3 of a stick of butter in 3 Tbls of EVOO. Saute the green onions until you can see through the white part. Season liberally (who says I'm a diehard conservative?) with Tony Chachere's Original Creole Seasoning.Add 3 heaping Tbls of flour and make a *light* reaux. Stir in the right amount of half&half milk to get just the creamy texture you want. Remember, the sauce isn't completely thickened until it starts to simmer. Next, add the mushrooms, red bell pepper and the *gently* fold in the lump crabmeat.Fill as many small bowls as you can, leaving enough room to cover with a layer of shredded cheese and a dusting of breadcrumbs.If you are like me, you will have forgotten to turn off the broiler so it is already pre-heated. Put some plates in the bottom of the oven to heat.If you have heavy stoneware bowls, you can skip placing the bowls in a water bath and put them directly under the broiler till the cheese melts and the crumbs are toasty.At this point you are ready to serve. Use your asbestos fingers to place the plates over the bowls, invert and remove the bowls so that the cheese is covered by the hot sauce and stays melted. (At least for a little while.)Sit back and enjoy!!!

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YIKES!!!I have no idea what that was... But I can assure you it was not Scrapple.
Maybe canned corned beef hash??? Hehe I hate to admit it, but I still eat the stuff...what the wife affectionately calls ALPO. ;)LEWMUR That sounds recipe heavenly.Question?? how do you guys deal with a crab that escapes and makes a run for it by hiding under the couch? B)
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Maybe canned corned beef hash??? Hehe I hate to admit it, but I still eat the stuff...what the wife affectionately calls ALPO. ;)LEWMUR That sounds recipe heavenly.Question?? how do you guys deal with a crab that escapes and makes a run for it by hiding under the couch? B)
My grandkids love pets. What's the problem?
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YIKES!!!I have no idea what that was... But I can assure you it was not Scrapple.  Sounds more like Spam (the original, I mean), or some other canned meat.Scrapple would never come in a can, to my knowledge.  And if it did...I wouldn't eat it. ;)
You have to realize that this was part of the "larder" on a long-distance sailboat race. If it didn't come in a can, it wasn't onboard.
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Here's the greatest recipe ever for Crabmeat Au Gratin'Sit back and enjoy!!!
So, when's the party, lewmur!! Heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeey-Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!! That sounds, Much More Better Than Good!!Temmu lives in your neck o' the woods. And I'm only a long day's drive away ;) :P
You have to realize that this was part of the "larder" on a long-distance sailboat race. If it didn't come in a can, it wasn't onboard.
That's different. You're forgiven. Haven't been long distance sailing... But I have Backpacked. Sometimes....Compromises are acceptable :(
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I've had Haggis twice. Really quite excellent... and it's another delicacy with more than a bit of debate (in Scotland,anyway) over what constitutes "proper" ingredients. However...All can agree that the best part of the tradition is a liberal christening with a good (single malt for me, please) Scotch upon "The Cutting" :(

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Sorry to jump in so late but you may have heard that a hurricane knocked out electricity in S. Florida for a few days (I'm in Palm Beach County).Anyway, this is one of my favorites. Hot Fudge Pudding Cake. With all that chocolate and sugar you can't possibly go wrong. (Make sure you DIVIDE the ingredients, though.)

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Thanks georgeg4, it's nice to be back.I thought I'd look for foods that don't need refrigeration.There's not much more that Ivan can do to us because Frances already knocked down every tree in the county. Palm Beach County is 50 miles north of Miami. You have Dade County, which is Miami. North of that is Broward County, which is Ft. Lauderdale. Just north of that is Palm Beach County, which is Boca Raton, Palm Beach and West Palm Beach.(I didn't intentionally overlook you, NRD, you just posted as I was writing mine. Hope you enjoy the Hot Fudge Pudding Cake.)

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Paracelsusi hate to burst your bubble buddy but scrapple (and Habberset was the very brand ) that did in fact come in a 5 pound tin years ago . I have had many breakfasts with Habberset on the home made bread that was baked in that very same tin that the scrapple came in.
OK, George...You've piqued my curiosity.:wacko: But I'll need to see it to believe it. Please define, "Years Ago". Our family ate nothing but Habbersett... and at least from my earliest memories (©1957) it was always in waxed paper type wrapping. Of course, we always bought if from the refrigerated case at the grocery store, and I wasn't the one doing the shopping, then. :PI may have to do some Googling on Scrapple and Habbersett history and see if I can find a picture of this.
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Hey George... No Problem. We all have our moments :PI took a look and by golly, you're right!! I had no idea Dietz & Watson made Scrapple. As a matter of fact... I always thought they were a strictly Kosher brand :">So, now it's my turn to apologize to lewmur... who was correct about having Scrapple from a can.

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Hey George... No Problem.  We all have our moments :PI took a look and by golly, you're right!!  I had no idea Dietz & Watson made Scrapple.  As a matter of fact... I always thought they were a strictly Kosher brand :">So, now it's my turn to apologize to lewmur... who was correct about having Scrapple from a can.
Dietz & Watson also carries a brand of pork & beef hot dogs. Perhaps they started as a Kosher company???I've never seen the scrapple in a tin either. Learn something new every day! Our local supermarket carries about three brands of scrapple but the only one I touch is Habberset. Not the beef variety either! Make mine pork!Since we're on a breakfast kick...How about creamed chip beef on toast. Comonly known as !@#$ on a shingle. My favorite brand is Knauss dried beef, sauted in butter before making the roux & adding the milk to boil slowly. mmmmOr Taylor pork roll breakfast sandwiches. :ph34r: B)
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Dietz & Watson also carries a brand of pork & beef hot dogs.  Perhaps they started as a Kosher company???
No Idea, NRD.I'm not familiar with their products, actually. Recall hearing the name (especially when I lived on the East Coast). I may be confusing D&W with some other "x&x" that is solely Kosher.
Not the beef variety either! Make mine pork!
Beef Scrapple!!! EEEeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!!!!:ph34r: ;) B) May as well have Pork flavored Turkey Scrapple :P
Since we're on a breakfast kick...How about creamed chip beef on toast. Commonly known as !@#$ on a shingle.
Love it!! But that was Dinner for us, way back when.... When James & Eileen had eight hungry mouths to feed... And James was a "Country Lawyer" in Indiana, PA. Made most of his yearly income doing tax work for the few local business owners.Thank goodness we all loved Creamed Chip Beef on Toast. Easy and cheap for Eileen to fix.We pretty much grew up on that... and Beans & Franks. Which I also never got tired of. :P
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We are talking haute cuisine here!
Since when, Juwie?? :P ;)Allow me to quote from the introductory Post....
This is a general... take as many wild tangents as you like... thread about:
So??....We're having a Wild Tangent :devil:I left plenty of leeway in this Thread :thumbsup:Nothing, food related, is actually :blink: :clap:
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Here's another one of my CHOCOLATE favorites. It was originally in the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook but BHG doesn't use it anymore because they are wimps and afraid of people suing them over salmonella. I have made this at least 10 times and never gotten sick from salmonella. But, use fresh eggs and use the recipe at your own peril (I don't want to be sued either).Have you ever had chocolate mousse? This is about 10 times sweeter!FRENCH SILK PIE1 cup sugar3/4 cup butter (not margarine)3 squares (3 ounces) unsweetened chocolate, melted and cooled *1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla3 (raw) eggs1 9 inch pastry shell (I use store bought graham cracker crust)Whipped cream (optional)Chocolate curls (optional)In a small mixer bowl cream sugar and butter about 4 minutes or till fluffy. Stir in cooled chocolate* and vanilla. Add eggs, one at a time, beating on medium speed, unti thoroughly mixed and fluffy. Turn into pastry shell. IMPORTANT - Chill several hours, but overnight is better.* See my next post for a better and cheaper chocolate substitute.

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The Chocolate SubstituteAs a chocoholic I find many recipes call for unsweetened chocolate squares. Who the heck keeps unsweetened chocolate squares around?This substitute has worked better than unsweetened chocolate squares every time I have tried it. You don't have to buy chocolate squares and have half of them left over and you don't have to go to the trouble of melting chocolate.For 1 square (1 ounce) of unsweetened chocolate substitute:3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (your general off the shelf Hershey's Cocoa Powder) and1 tablespoon butter

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Ewwww! SOS and bean and wieners.  We are talking haute cuisine here!  At least it is not more scrapple talk.  I would prefer Scrabble talk! :clap:
Haute cuisine??? :blink: Over sauced efette snobbery in my opinion. I much prefer provencal dishes. There is nothing like digging into some good old fashioned "comfort food" like Scrapple, SOS, Chilli etc. Now about chili....beans or no? I know proper Chilli is made without beans, but I love adding them....along with a bottle of beer in the mix
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Who the heck keeps unsweetened chocolate squares around?
HEHE...That would be me. :blink: I currently have two packages of the stuff.WebbPA I'm going to try that Silk Pie recipe on Monday. I'm trying to empty the larder before hitting the diet trail :clap:
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