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Arch linux articles through the ages.

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abarbarian

I have included this more for curiosity value as I have a feeling the os may not survive for long. I may be wrong .........

 

VeltOS Is Based on Arch Linux and Budgie, Lets Users Vote on New Features (2015)

 

 

VeltOS is a new Linux distribution based on Arch Linux that wants to do something that hasn't been tried before, and that is to move the decision process in the hands of the community.

 

:breakfast:

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abarbarian

BlackArch Linux Penetration Testing OS Gets New ISOs with Updated Installer(2016)

 

In related news, the team was proud to announce recently the availability of a new BlackArch Linux OVA image that helps users use the ethical hacking/penetration testing OS on VirtualBox- or VMware-based virtual machines. These are available along with the 64-bit and 32-bit ISOs from the official homepage.

 

Black Arch for white hats , seems very yin and yang to me. :whistling:

Edited by abarbarian

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securitybreach

BlackArch Linux Penetration Testing OS Gets New ISOs with Updated Installer

 

In related news, the team was proud to announce recently the availability of a new BlackArch Linux OVA image that helps users use the ethical hacking/penetration testing OS on VirtualBox- or VMware-based virtual machines. These are available along with the 64-bit and 32-bit ISOs from the official homepage.

 

Black Arch for white hats , seems very yin and yang to me. :whistling:

 

BTW you can also add the blackarch repos to normal archlinux. All of the packages it provides are in the AUR anyway so you could install whatever you needed that blackarch provides from AUR without the repos.

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abarbarian

BlackArch Linux Penetration Testing OS Gets New ISOs with Updated Installer

 

In related news, the team was proud to announce recently the availability of a new BlackArch Linux OVA image that helps users use the ethical hacking/penetration testing OS on VirtualBox- or VMware-based virtual machines. These are available along with the 64-bit and 32-bit ISOs from the official homepage.

 

Black Arch for white hats , seems very yin and yang to me. :whistling:

 

BTW you can also add the blackarch repos to normal archlinux. All of the packages it provides are in the AUR anyway so you could install whatever you needed that blackarch provides from AUR without the repos.

 

https://blackarch.org/

 

BlackArch Linux is an Arch Linux-based penetration testing distribution for penetration testers and security researchers. The repository contains 1629 tools. You can install tools individually or in groups. BlackArch Linux is compatible with existing Arch installs.

 

Take a long time to install 1629 tools though :whistling:

 

Nice that they inform you that it is compatible with running Arch installs.

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securitybreach

Nice that they inform you that it is compatible with running Arch installs.

 

Well that means nothing when the packages come from the AUR in the first place. Of course, they are compatible...

 

They just host the compiled binaries in a mirror, nothing else. You could do the same for your favorite packages..

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abarbarian

Bluestar Linux: A Beautiful Take on KDE and a User-Friendly Arch-Based Distribution(2016)

 

 

The necessary specs

 

If you plan on running Bluestar Linux, the only specs you really need to be concerned about are the following:

  • Minimum of 6.5GB free hard space
  • Minimum of 1GB of working RAM

The RAM requirements seem a bit high, but this is really a KDE recommendation. If you glance at the KDE system requirements, you see the Bluestar minimum makes sense.

  • Processor: Minimum 1 GHz (x86) Recommended Better than 1 GHz (x86)
  • Memory: Minimum 512 MB Recommended 1 GB
  • Hard drive capacity Minimum 4 GB Recommended 10 GB

NOTE: After a failed install on VirtualBox, having given 8GB to the hard drive and 2GB of RAM, I upped the system to 16GB of space and 3GB of RAM, and the installation succeeded. So these aren’t your grandfather’s Linux requirements.

 

Home site

 

http://bluestarlinux...hp?action=about

 

Looks interesting and the KDE visuals are great. You can run from a usb with persistence which is a handy feature. :breakfast:

Edited by abarbarian
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securitybreach

How in the world are they actually claiming that 1gb of ram is high? Even your average, run of the mill, laptop comes with 4 or 6gb of ram.. Heck my least powerful machine (netbook) has 8gb of ram and my highest one has 95gb of ram..

 

I was going to try it out in Qemu but the last release was November 18, 2015.. I couldn't imagine the amount of updates you would have to install, just to get it up to current.

 

Ah, they have a developer edition from November 2016: https://sourceforge....inux-developer/

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abarbarian

How in the world are they actually claiming that 1gb of ram is high?

 

Not everyone in the world is as fortunate as you. An that includes millions of folk in the developed nations not just folk in third world countries. :whistling:

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securitybreach

Yeah, I know but I doubt most distros would even run comfortably on that amount of ram..

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abarbarian

Yeah, I know but I doubt most distros would even run comfortably on that amount of ram..

 

Hmm this is from 2015 so slightly out of date. It depends on what you use a pc for whether you need a huge speed machine or a bunny boiler. I guess most of these distros on that equipment with a lightweight browser would be acceptable for browsing and suchlike.

 

It’s been a while but once again here is the latest instalment of the series of posts where I install the major, full desktop, distributions into a limited hardware machine and report on how they perform. Once again, and like before, I’ve decided to re-run my previous tests this time using the following distributions:

  • Debian 8.2 (Cinnamon)
  • Debian 8.2 (GNOME)
  • Debian 8.2 (KDE)
  • Debian 8.2 (MATE)
  • Debian 8.2 (Xfce)
  • Elementary OS 0.3.1 (Freya)
  • Kubuntu 15.10 (KDE)
  • Linux Mint 17.2 (Cinnamon)
  • Linux Mint 17.2 (MATE)
  • Linux Mint 17.2 (Xfce)
  • Mageia 5 (GNOME)
  • Mageia 5 (KDE)
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Unity)
  • Xubuntu 15.10 (Xfce)

I also attempted to try and install Fedora 23, Linux Mint 17.2 (KDE) and OpenSUSE 42.1 but none of them were able to complete installation.

All of the tests were done within VirtualBox on ‘machines’ with the following specifications:

  • Total RAM: 512MB
  • Hard drive: 10GB
  • CPU type: x86 with PAE/NX
  • Graphics: 3D Acceleration enabled

 

https://thelinuxexperiment.com/tag/512mb/

 

:whistling:

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securitybreach

True

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abarbarian

Arch Linux & GNOME 3 – A bit of a review / experience report(2016)

 

 

 

After over 7 years of using Linux Mint (first with GNOME 2 and then with MATE), today I installed Arch Linux and GNOME 3.

I decided to make the jump for a couple of reasons. Firstly, my laptop has been struggling performance-wise, so I thought a leaner and more customisable distro would help with that. Secondly, Arch Linux due to it’s ‘rolling release’ system is bleeding edge and always has the very latest software packages. With Linux Mint, it’s very hard to upgrade software packages to the latest version.

 

:breakfast:

Edited by abarbarian
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abarbarian

A Week in the Life of an Arch Linux Newbi (2005)

 

At this point, I expect many readers are thinking “Debian” or “Slackware”. Both are well-established distros and I was tempted by both. I had heard anecdotally that Slackware's package management is rather simplistic, e.g., no dependency resolution. (I love how the Slackware entry in Wikipedia describes this as a “unique” feature!) Naturally, 3rd party tools like Swaret came into existence to remedy this, but I was still put off. I did try a Debian-based system in the shape of SimplyMepis. I was very impressed with the simplicity of installation. It begins as a liveCD that you boot from and a fully functional KDE desktop is loaded. If you wish, you can then click an icon and you follow a little wizard, and before you know it, Mepis is installed! It was the easiest and quickest install I had performed and I expect this approach will become increasingly common in the near future. However, the main attraction with Mepis (for me) is that you have access to the vast Debian repositories, accessible through the well-known apt-get tool. Things ran smoothly with Mepis. The Apt system wasn't as great as I had expected, although admittedly I wasn't overly familiar. Debian has a reputation for being a tad too safe with packages it considers 'stable'. So trying to update KDE 3.2 to 3.3 wasn't as straightforward. Anyway, there was nothing really wrong with Mepis, but I just had this little itch as I recalled a review I read ages ago about ArchLinux. I thought, “right, I'll give it a try, and if it doesn't work out, then I quickly stick Mepis back on.” Well, I've not had that urge yet!

 

 

The forums are very good. At the time of writing there are almost 2800 registered users who have read/contributed to some 58,000 articles. The groups are divided into 4 main sections: General for security advisories, announcements and off-topic discussions; Arch Linux section has the typical boards for installation, Arch Linux general discussion, desktop environments, etc; A Pacman section for boards discussing how to make packages, package requests, etc; and finally a general GNU/Linux section for general Linux discussion. I must admit, I think the boards could be tweaked a bit,

 

 

History is always worth studying :thumbsup:

Edited by abarbarian

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securitybreach

Nice reviews, thanks for sharing. :thumbsup:

 

I especially enjoyed the second one as it brought back some memories. Of course this was two years prior to when I first installed Archlinux but I remember having to configure various things talked about in the article. Amazing how much has changed and how much has stayed the same.

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abarbarian

Nice reviews, thanks for sharing. :thumbsup:

 

I especially enjoyed the second one as it brought back some memories. Of course this was two years prior to when I first installed Archlinux but I remember having to configure various things talked about in the article. Amazing how much has changed and how much has stayed the same.

 

Knew you would appreciate the older article. 2800 registered members, I will bet you had more folk than that sign up for your G+ on the first day :D

 

Oh an 2005 was a year after I used my first pc. :rolleyes:

Edited by abarbarian
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Knew you would appreciate the older article. 2800 registered members, I will bet you had more folk than that sign up for your G+ on the first day :D

 

Hehehe, I doubt it.. B)

 

Oh an 2005 was a year after I used my first pc. :rolleyes:

 

Really??? What were you doing in the 80s and 90s?

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abarbarian

Knew you would appreciate the older article. 2800 registered members, I will bet you had more folk than that sign up for your G+ on the first day :D

 

Hehehe, I doubt it.. B)

 

Oh an 2005 was a year after I used my first pc. :rolleyes:

 

Really??? What were you doing in the 80s and 90s?

 

Chasing weomen

Getting drunk

Getting stoned

Rock climbing

Going to music concerts

Night clubing

Driving fast cars

Raising cash

Playing at Ti Chi

Probably a couple of other things aswell.

 

:thumbup:

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Hedon James

 

Chasing weomen

Getting drunk

Getting stoned

Rock climbing

Going to music concerts

Night clubing

Driving fast cars

Raising cash

Playing at Ti Chi

Probably a couple of other things aswell.

 

:thumbup:

 

Awesome! The 80's get a bad rap, in my book. The last decade you were not only ALLOWED, but EXPECTED to have a "good time"! P.S. Perhaps we've previously met in the real world, but only know each other on BATL by our avatar names?! :pirate:

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Chasing weomen

Getting drunk

Getting stoned

Rock climbing

Going to music concerts

Night clubing

Driving fast cars

Raising cash

Playing at Ti Chi

Probably a couple of other things aswell.

 

:thumbup:

 

I was doing some of those same things but I still took part in the "computer revolution"... a little bit anyway... BBSs, building computers and such..

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abarbarian

Chasing weomen

Getting drunk

Getting stoned

Rock climbing

Going to music concerts

Night clubing

Driving fast cars

Raising cash

Playing at Ti Chi

Probably a couple of other things aswell.

 

:thumbup:

 

Awesome! The 80's get a bad rap, in my book. The last decade you were not only ALLOWED, but EXPECTED to have a "good time"! P.S. Perhaps we've previously met in the real world, but only know each other on BATL by our avatar names?! :pirate:

 

We could possibly have met as I travelled all over the uk but it would have been in passing. B)

 

Chasing weomen

Getting drunk

Getting stoned

Rock climbing

Going to music concerts

Night clubing

Driving fast cars

Raising cash

Playing at Ti Chi

Probably a couple of other things aswell.

 

:thumbup:

 

I was doing some of those same things but I still took part in the "computer revolution"... a little bit anyway... BBSs, building computers and such..

 

Only hi-tech I ever used was a Panasonic answering machine. Bought it for two reasons, you could use ordinary cassette tapes in it so that meant loads of space for messages, and you could access it from any ordinary landline phone with a small handheld gadget. This meant folk could leave me esoterik messages and I could listen to them and no one would know where I was.

 

:ph34r:

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V.T. Eric Layton

I did some...

 

Chasing women

Getting drunk

Getting stoned

Rock climbing

Going to music concerts

Night clubbing

Driving fast cars (and motorcycles)

Raising cash

Playing at Ti Chi

Probably a couple of other things as well. (Yeah... a few.)

 

 

I got a degree in Computer Engineering Technology in 1980. We studied the 8080A and Z80 processors back then. Those are just a wee bit obsolete these days. I played around with Commodore computers in the early 80s; gaming (Zork, Wolfenstein, etc.), BBS's, and 300 baud dial-up. Then for a long stretch ('85 to about '99) I didn't have anything to do with computers or the Internet. I was using the Internet on my brother's computer at his apartment in '99. In spring of 2000, he bought himself a nice new Gateway custom computer (AMD K7 Thunderbird - one of the greatest cpus ever pressed into silicon). I inherited his little Pentium I (90mhz) that I had been using at his apartment. From there my adventure began. It really got fun when Urmas and a couple other friends egged me into installing Ubuntu 6.06 Dapper Drake on ericsbane01 (a K7 system that I had bought at a computer show). Ah... those were heady days. And here I am at ericsbane07, senior editor of the Slackware Documentation Project, friend of many Linux gurus, generally world famous for my witty repartee on G+ and my personal blogs.

 

To quote

, "What a long strange trip it's been." :w00t:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

Edited by V.T. Eric Layton
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Eric! :thumbup:

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abarbarian

My very first pc was equipped with one of those, (AMD K7 Thunderbird - one of the greatest cpus ever pressed into silicon) , an Urmas persuaded me to call in here and become a penguin. :rolleyes:

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V.T. Eric Layton

Urmas was an outstanding ambassador of Linux. :)

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V.T. Eric Layton

By the way, you and still visit Urmas at my Cabin In the Woods board. He's there most every day. He just had a birthday this past Saturday, too. Sadly, no one posted here about that. :(

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Yeah, I wondered what happened to ole Urmas. We used to have some long conversations via IRC. Tell him that we miss him around these parts

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abarbarian

By the way, you and still visit Urmas at my Cabin In the Woods board. He's there most every day. He just had a birthday this past Saturday, too. Sadly, no one posted here about that. :(

 

Sorted ! http://forums.scotsn...750#entry443672

 

Now that I have lost my cabin in the woods and I have decent broadband I may just pop in from time to time at your cabin.

Edited by abarbarian

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V.T. Eric Layton

Just click on vtel57.com in my siggy for the Cabin link.

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abarbarian

Arch Linux: In a world of polish, DIY never felt so good(2016)

 

 

 

Dig through the annals of Linux journalism and you'll find a surprising amount of coverage of some pretty obscure distros. Flashy new distros like Elementary OS and Solus garner attention for their slick interfaces, and anything shipping with a MATE desktop gets coverage by simple virtue of using MATE.

Thanks to television shows like Mr Robot, I fully expect coverage of even Kali Linux to be on the uptick soon.

In all that coverage, though, there's one very widely used distro that's almost totally ignored: Arch Linux.

 

:breakfast:

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Arch Linux: In a world of polish, DIY never felt so good(2016)

 

 

 

Dig through the annals of Linux journalism and you'll find a surprising amount of coverage of some pretty obscure distros. Flashy new distros like Elementary OS and Solus garner attention for their slick interfaces, and anything shipping with a MATE desktop gets coverage by simple virtue of using MATE.

Thanks to television shows like Mr Robot, I fully expect coverage of even Kali Linux to be on the uptick soon.

In all that coverage, though, there's one very widely used distro that's almost totally ignored: Arch Linux.

 

:breakfast:

 

Very cool :thumbsup:

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