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Interesting Stuff You Saw on the I-net Today


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Winding a weight clock

I'm not sure if you can access this from outside Australia, but this is a beautiful series of pictures from around the country. They post a new set every week.   http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWe1XpozMRQ

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sunrat

That one reminded me of the Australian Silo Art Trail, a breathtaking series of gigantic art works painted on wheat silos, water tanks, and other features in country towns spread right across Australia. It takes a drive of over 8,000 kilometres to visit them all. I've seen a few of them and they really are beautiful to behold, often in a town amongst thousands of hectares of flat grain producing country.

 

https://www.australiansiloarttrail.com/

 

 

 

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abarbarian
Posted (edited)

From Earth to orbit with Linux and SpaceX

 

Neat article on how penguins are leading the space race.

 

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So, thanks in part to Linux, we've returned to manned spaceflight in the US. And, this it seems penguins can fly, with sufficient rocket power behind them.

 

Amazon's Satellite Internet Service, Project Kuiper, Gets a Launch Partner

I have been following the internet in space stuff since it was first mentioned and find it fascinating.
 

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Project Kuiper is poised to compete with Starlink, the satellite internet system from SpaceX. To launch the initial batch of satellites, Amazon plans on using the Atlas V rocket from United Launch Alliance.

 

 

 

 


Starlink: Here Are the Download Speeds You Can Expect Across North America

 

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In the US during Q1, the median download speeds for Starlink users ranged from 40Mbps to 93Mbps depending on the location, according to data from Ookla's SpeedTest.

 

There are other companies offering space internet at the moment and lots of stories and articles too.

 

Tested: SpaceX's Starlink Satellite Internet Service Is Fast, But It'll Cost You

 

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😎

Edited by abarbarian
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abarbarian

Meet the mystery woman who mastered IBM’s 5,400-character Chinese typewriter

 

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The IBM Chinese typewriter was a formidable machine—not something just anyone could handle with the aplomb of the young typist in the film. On the keyboard affixed to the hulking, gunmetal gray chassis, 36 keys were divided into four banks: 0 through 5; 0 through 9; 0 through 9; and 0 through 9. With just these 36 keys, the machine was capable of producing up to 5,400 Chinese characters in all, wielding a language that was infinitely more difficult to mechanize than English or other Western writing systems.

 

😎

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zlim

Great article!

I have a question for Corrine. Did you ever eat at the Cathay Pagoda?

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Corrine
On 5/29/2021 at 11:20 AM, zlim said:

Great article!

I have a question for Corrine. Did you ever eat at the Cathay Pagoda?

 

Sorry, no.  When I was working in that vicinity,  99% of the time we ate in one of the cafeterias (yes, there were several in the complex.)

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abarbarian
On 6/14/2021 at 2:30 AM, crp said:

 

 

I can remember some epic games of marbles from when I was a nipper. Had a collection of 321 including 32 giant size ones. By ek them wer the days. 😋

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abarbarian

Scientists convert plastic waste into vanilla flavoring

 

Worried about all the plastic waste swamping the planet. There is a solution at hand.

 

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In the future, your vanilla ice cream may be made from plastic bottles. Scientists have figured out a way to convert plastic waste into vanilla flavoring with genetically engineered bacteria, according to a new study.

 

😂

 

 

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zlim

Sounds dangerous. Plastic bottles and genetically engineered E. coli bacteria.

If something goes wrong do we end up with food poisoning?

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abarbarian
2 hours ago, zlim said:

Sounds dangerous. Plastic bottles and genetically engineered E. coli bacteria.

If something goes wrong do we end up with food poisoning?

 

I recon they are trying to change us all into robots. Then they would not have to spend so much on healthcare. An workers could work harder and longer. It is a plot  definitely a plot 😂

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abarbarian

Whole Milk Mounts Its Triumphant Comeback

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“I think consumers were fed this lie by what I call the Goop Industrial Complex that if you cut dairy from your diet you will have more energy, clearer skin, and you will never ever fart ever again. But the case against dairy ignores many of the complexities of our food system, and I think people are starting to realize that.”

Yeah well I was never suckered into buying skimmed milk I have always used full milk.An I have always used real butter too. 😝

 

 

 

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V.T. Eric Layton

I always buy whole milk, also. Unfortunately, compared to the milk I grew up with in the 60s, today's "whole milk" is so watered down, it's almost skim milk.

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abarbarian
On 9/4/2021 at 4:02 PM, V.T. Eric Layton said:

I always buy whole milk, also. Unfortunately, compared to the milk I grew up with in the 60s, today's "whole milk" is so watered down, it's almost skim milk.

 

Must be an American rip of then as we can still get proper full cream milk. I think in the supermarkets we have about five or six different types of milk with varying amounts of cream taken out. 😎

 

'Stargate' to help colonize other planets

Not the tv series.

 

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Relativity Space's success or failure will ride on its Stargate system: the largest metal 3D printer on Earth, according to Ellis. It's designed to be the core technology that enables printing big rocket parts.

 

Fabulous stuff. 😎

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Pete!

It might be the result of modern processing. They separate the cream, and add it back later to meet the specification for the product.  For whole milk the cream is reintroduced until the fat content reaches 3.25%.

 

Depending on your former source, it may have come out of the cow(s) with a higher percentage.

 

Source: https://milk.procon.org/how-milk-gets-from-the-cow-to-the-store/   (Scroll down to "Separation")

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abarbarian
42 minutes ago, Pete! said:

It might be the result of modern processing. They separate the cream, and add it back later to meet the specification for the product.  For whole milk the cream is reintroduced until the fat content reaches 3.25%.

 

Depending on your former source, it may have come out of the cow(s) with a higher percentage.

 

Source: https://milk.procon.org/how-milk-gets-from-the-cow-to-the-store/   (Scroll down to "Separation")

 

Pretty much the same here.

 

https://www.dairyuk.org/our-dairy-products/

 

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Most milk is also homogenised. All homogenisation does is to break up the fat globules in milk so that it mixes and doesn’t separate and rise to the top. Homogenisation is done by passing milk under pressure through very fine nozzles which evenly disperse the fat globules.

Milk is also standardised, so that your whole milk, semi-skimmed and skimmed milks have the right amount of fat in them. This is done by removing the cream and then adding it back in, in precise amounts, to make whole milk (3.5% fat or more), semi-skimmed (1.5-1.8% fat) and skimmed milk (up to 0.3% fat).

Some brands also offer a 1%-fat milk and a rich Channel Island milk, which comes from Jersey and Guernsey cows, containing 5% fat that has a visible cream line. Others offer milk that is not homogenised.

Organic milk comes from organic farms, which must be registered and regularly inspected by an organic certifier.

 

I grew up next door to a farm. One of my tasks was to take a jug to the farm and bring home two pints of milk taken from the bulk tank every evening. This stored and chilled fresh milk from the cows that had been milked a hour or so ago.  So it was not pasteurised or filtered or mucked about in any way. I can not recall anyone in the family or on the farm ever getting ill from drinking this fresh milk. It were a delicious drink specially matched with fresh bread made by my dad and luverly home made strawberry jam. Ah them were days. 😋

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abarbarian
5 hours ago, crp said:

 

Bond would love to have one of those gadgets.

 

The above is based on this science,

 

Seeing Around Corners Using Lasers and Imaging

 

"Captures images of objects around corners and behind obstacles

 

Light scattered back off of hidden target used to reconstruct a 3D model of the target

 

Involves scattering laser light off of surrounding objects onto a hidden target

 

Many potential benefits for autonomous vehicles, public health, and medical imaging

A direct line of sight between an object and a camera or detector is typically needed for every imaging application except for extreme cases such as light bending due to gravitational lensing in astronomy. But for the most part, imaging applications are limited to light propagating in a straight line. However, that is starting to change as some cutting edge research is opening up possibilities to image around corners and around obstacles. A combination of lasers, sensitive cameras, and computational reconstruction methods can be used to detect objects hidden by obstacles by scattering light off of surrounding objects."

 

😎

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abarbarian

The disastrous voyage of Satoshi, the world’s first cryptocurrency cruise ship

A fascinating  story for cruisers or crypto currency fans.

 

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Then, in October 2020, it seemed his dream might finally come true, when three seasteading enthusiasts bought a 245-metre-long cruise ship called the Pacific Dawn. Grant Romundt, Rüdiger Koch and Chad Elwartowski planned to sail the ship to Panama, where they were based, and park it permanently off the coastline as the centrepiece of a new society trading only in cryptocurrencies. In homage to Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonym of bitcoin’s mysterious inventor (or inventors), they renamed the ship the MS Satoshi. They hoped it would become home to people just like them: digital nomads, startup founders and early bitcoin adopters.

😎

 

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