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V.T. Eric Layton
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spotifydl is clear of everything else in my humble opinion. This utility/software saved me some big bucks I wasn't willing to spend. And then there's Krita which I use to draw a lot.

When Linux distributions are concerned, my top two for now are LMDE and Arch. The former is Linux Mint with a Debian base, updated only after the next release, medium bloat. And the latter, is just - based.

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1 hour ago, linux screwed me up sadly said:

spotifydl is clear of everything else in my humble opinion.

 

Sorry to cast aspersions when you have just joined here, but it appears this parses a spotify playlist, downloads it from YouTube which default format is lossy Ogg Opus, and then converts it to mp3. As someones who cares a lot about audio quality, I have to say converting from a lossy format to another lossy format is sacrilege. You'd be much better to download the audio files directly from YouTube and keep them as Ogg Opus which is a vastly better and more modern format than mp3, and supported natively in Linux and Android.

 

Welcome to Scot's BTW. You'll find a lot of good info, facts, and help here, only slightly clouded by opinions unlike much of the internet. 😁

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abarbarian

get_iplayer: BBC iPlayer/BBC Sounds Indexing Tool and PVR

 

If you are a BBC licence holder then this is a great tool for downloading stuff you missed.

 

So far I have only tried it for programs from the radio. Downloaded single episodes and ten episodes at a time and the program coped with the tasks very well..

if you peruse the wiki or guides you can set a custom folder to download to for every series of a broadcast or you can set a custom default folder which is what I have done. I do not think I will use the PVR facility as I tend to download complete series after they have aired.

You can also set the program to convert radio broadcasts to .mp3 at various bitrates as a default action. This I have also done as I will be listening to stuff on my car radio through its .mp3 facility whilst driving with no passengers.

 

This is the first program I tested get_iplayer on,

 

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

 

an I have downloaded this for my great niece as she is nearly nine,

 

Once Upon a Time in Zombieville

 

Naturally I will have to check out all four series to make sure that thy are suitable for her. 😋

 

get_iplayer Installation

 

Linux/BSD package installation

 

I used the DEBIAN  package from the above link on my MX-21 laptop and will try out the AUR offering later on on my main pc. The DEBIAN package installed all the extra stuff aswell so it was a quick and painless install.

 

Tutorials -- well worth a look, lots of handy tips etc.

 

Enjoy folks.😎

 

Just realised that I did all the above whilst my VPN was set to the USA. Not really a problem as I do have a BBC licence. 😜

 

 

 

 

 

 

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securitybreach

I didn't know that you paid for a license to see BBC. Of course, I haven't had cable in over 15 years now.

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abarbarian
37 minutes ago, securitybreach said:

 

 

 

Don't they also make money on the ads like other tv channels? https://www.bbc.com/news/explainers-51376255

 

Sorry to get off topic, just curious.

 

Television licensing in the United Kingdom

 

The BBC is funded entirely by licence fees which allows it to be independent of government interference and thus an impartial source of news and reporting. It does not have any paid adverts at all for the same reason. The only adverts on the BBC are for BBC programs.

The BBC does have a commercial arm where it sells programs worldwide such as  Dr Who for instance.

Originally broadcast over the air the BBC now has an internet presence. First we had one BBC channel, then BBC and ITV, followed by BBC 1 and 2 and ITV, then BBC1 and 2 and ITV and Channel4. Now we have a lot of Regional BBC channels plus the main four BBC channels and there are over 400 independent privately funded channels available over here.

 

This list of linear television channels in the United Kingdom refers to television in the United Kingdom which is available from digital terrestrial, satellite, cable, and IPTV providers, with an estimated more than 480 channels

 

 

😎

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abarbarian
On 3/12/2020 at 9:16 PM, sunrat said:

 

I find MPV to be more reliable and less buggy, and it sometimes plays files VLC refuses. There is a simple frontend for it I just found recently called Celluloid which is basic but neat.

I still have VLC installed though, mainly for its ability to loop a section of video if you show the Advanced controls bar. It did freeze up completely on me the other day and I had to killall -9 vlc as I couldn't stop it any other way.

 

https://github.com/mpv-player/mpv/wiki/User-Scripts

 

Have you tried any of the scripts you can add to mpv ?

 

I use,

 

https://github.com/mpv-player/mpv/blob/master/TOOLS/lua/autoload.lua  Fab as it plays the next video so you do not have to do anything, also means you do not disturb the cat sitting on your lap.

 

history-bookmark.lua    This is great for when you have a series to watch and you can not remember which episode you last watched.

 

https://github.com/mpv-player/mpv/blob/master/TOOLS/lua/autocrop.lua useful for old 4:3 videos makes them a full fit on a widescreen, does it nicely too.

 

https://github.com/Samillion/mpv-boxtowide trialling this as an alternative to the above.

 

😎

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securitybreach

I just use shift+a to cycle through the aspect ratios. I have not used user-scripts for MPV and didn't even know that they existed. I could see where the next episode one could be useful but can you toggle it on and off as it would work for a tv series but not a folder full of movies.

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abarbarian
14 hours ago, securitybreach said:

I could see where the next episode one could be useful but can you toggle it on and off

 

Not sure if you can switch it on and of. I find it really useful for me anime series. I have a folder for movies but I keep each film in its own folder inside that, not sure why maybe because of the way I collected them. Possibly because I need to keep subtitles in with the film.

I never even knew about "shift+a" guess I should RTFM more often. 😎

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abarbarian

Excellent Utilities: croc – securely transfer files and folders

I read about this utility a while ago and it appeared recently in the above article. I am posting a link to it as the site is very good for finding information about all sorts of linux friendly software. 

They usually present information in this format which I find neat and useful.

Quote

 

Back in croc land here is a more in depth look at croc,

 

Securely Transfer Files and Folders Between Computers Using Croc

 

Quote

Croc is a free and open-source command line tool that allows any two computers to simply and securely transfer files and folders using code phrases.

"Croc is a file transfer system that sends files securely using end-to-end encryption, via a file transfer relay. If you are curious about the name, it is inspired by the fable of the frog and the crocodile. The Croc key advantages are speed, security, and simplicity, all-in-one. Transferring data using Croc is faster, because it acts as a relay server between the systems. It creates a full-duplex real-time communication layer between the two computers, so the “uploading” and “downloading” tasks occur simultaneously between those computers.

Croc is a cross-platform tool. It is written in GO programming language and freely available under MIT license. You can install it on Linux, Mac, Windows, and Android, and securely transfer files between them. Croc does not only work in same LAN but on any two computers connected to the internet."

 

This is the developers blog where he explains more about croc,

 

File transfer between any computers

 

Quote

I created yet another way to transfer files that strikes a good balance between speed, security or simplicity by using relay-assisted peer-to-peer transactions and end-to-end encryption via password-authenticated key exchange.

There are a lot of ways to transfer files.

 

His GitHub page.

 

I installed croc on my old MX-21 powered ToughBook and my speedy Arch rig. Both installs were quick and painless.

 

As I have Keepassxc installed on both pc's and I had made some changes to the TB one I tried out croc by transferring the Keepass Data folder from the TB to Arch wirelessly from the kitchen to the living room. It is only a small folder and the transfer was super quick. As I had not fully RTFM, who does, I was surprised when croc asked me if I wanted to replace several files. I accepted the replacements and after the transfer I checked that both copies of the Data folder were the same, which they were. After a quick read I found that if you had a terminal open on both pc's, I had a terminal open in HOME on both pc's, and you transfer a folder which resides in the same location on both pc's, which the Data folder did, then croc will replace the folder or file on the receiving pc.

Just a point to be aware of.

Next I did a transfer of a 2.2GB folder containing loads of X Minus One sci fi radio episodes from the TB to the Arch. I only had this folder initially on the TB. The speed of the transfer was pretty darn fast. An just to see I sent a similar sized folder from Arch to the TB and had the same speedy transfer.

To make things simpler I set croc to use a customised code for the transfer rather than use the croc generated one.

 

#Croc with customised transfer --code

$ croc send --code abarbarian KeePassDataBase
Sending 'KeePasss2018Feb.kdbx' (36.6 kB)
Code is: abarbarian
On the other computer run

croc abarbarian

#Croc using the built in transfer code

$ croc send KeePassDataBase
Sending 'KeePasss2018Feb.kdbx' (36.6 kB)
Code is: 1185-answer-summer-salute
On the other computer run

croc 1185-answer-summer-salute

 

You can see the difference one is much simpler than the other.

 

So for me I think this will be quite a useful tool as I will be transferring anime series from Arch to the TB. Also I will be transferring stuff from the TB to Arch as I am using the TB more now I have it set up in the kitchen. It is nice to look up and out of the kitchen window at the river and fields every now and again, also the TB uses a lot less lecy and is cheaper to run.

 

If anyone fancies trying croc out to transfer something over the internet give me a pm and we can have a go. 😎

Edited by abarbarian
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abarbarian

Remind: The Ultimate Personal Calendar

 

Quote

Remind is a calendar and reminder program for Linux and most UNIX Systems. I started writing Remind in 1989 because I was fed up with the limitations of the UNIX calendar program. In the last ten years, it has accreted features and has become one of the most sophisticated calendar programs I've seen. I'd like to take you on a journey through the history of Remind, demonstrating some of the features which lead me to immodestly call it the “Ultimate Personal Calendar”.

 

Remind

 

Quote

Remind is a sophisticated calendar and alarm program. It includes the following features:

  • A sophisticated scripting language and intelligent handling of exceptions and holidays.
  • Plain-text, PDF, PostScript and HTML output.
  • Timed reminders and pop-up alarms.
  • A friendly graphical front-end for people who don't want to learn the scripting language.
  • Facilities for both the Gregorian and Hebrew calendars.
  • Support for 12 different languages.

 

Remind FAQ

 

Quote

Why would I want to use Remind?

  • Remind is very fast and lightweight in comparison to typical GUI calendar programs.
  • Remind can handle rather complicated recurring reminders, which are beyond the capability of most calendar applications.
  • Remind can interact well with other programs. You can quickly add reminders from the terminal, with Quicksilver, or with a homebrewed Python script; you can schedule applications to execute through Remind; you can display Remind's output through an external application, or even read off your reminders with a text-to-speech program.
  • If you have any programming experience, then the idea of using a scripting language to describe a calendar may seem very natural to you.

 

tkremind(1) - Linux man page

 

Quote

TkRemind is a graphical front-end to the Remind program. It provides a friendly graphical interface which allows you to view your calendar and add reminders without learning the syntax of Remind. Although not all of Remind's features are available with TkRemind, TkRemind gives you an opportunity to edit the reminder commands which it creates. This allows you to learn Remind's syntax and then add extra features as you become a more sophisticated Remind programmer.

 

The man pages are an excellent source for help with using the program.

 

Further Information on the Wiki

 

Mike Harris looks at "Remind"

 

Quote

Roaring Penguin is currently the caretaker of an open source project that has, in one form or another, been around since 1988, called Remind. Remind is a Unix-driven calendaring program of great flexibility and power, but, better yet, for the most part, it works with the command line and with plain text. With the deliciousness of Mac OS X, though, you can integrate it into your background processes and GUI with very little effort and splash.

 

Remind – The Perfect Calendar For Linux April 15, 2021 by Lloyd Byron

 

Quote

The remind app, since it is written in remind (the programming language), is typically run in a text/code editor like vim, nano, or emacs or the Linux terminal. Remind code for calendar events can be entered into the editor of your choice, then these lines of code are saved to a file with a .rem extension and when scanned create the calendar in the terminal. But, if you’re not comfortable working in the Linux terminal, take heart in the fact that remind has a GUI front-end application to help you create your calendar events and generate your calendars outside of the terminal which can even be printed. The GUI front-end app for remind is called tkRemind. This is installed in the terminal as well, and then you can create a desktop launcher for tkremind so you only have to double-click on the icon representing the app to launch it.

 

How I use remind(1)  Tim Chase  2020-02-16

 

This is a fabulous source of information on how to use REMIND, including gems like,

 

Quote

Labels

Because I have a file for each type of reminder, I find it handy to prefix each item with its filename using the special msgprefix(x) function (which I also use for colorizing agenda reminders😞

 

Quote

Color

As a rule, I generally want plain-text reminders, whether emailing them to myself or displaying a calendar with rem -c. But when at the command-line, I like a bit of color.

 

Quote

Speech

The readable nature of the output makes it easy to pipe output to a program like espeak (or another text-to-speech engine which you would also have to install) to read your reminders aloud. You might create a custom spoken.rem file that you don't INCLUDE in your regular reminders.rem in which you remove the BANNER, emit section dividers (if you don't choose to use display labels), and INCLUDE a select subset of calendars:

 

I am not a terminal ninja so I use TkRemind and have done so for quite a while,

 

https://forums.scotsnewsletter.com/index.php?/topic/56171-window-maker/&do=findComment&comment=452936

 

Naturally I use it with my Window Maker set up 😜

 

At present I am trying to figure out how to get  TkRemind to show the phases of the moon and information like "Earth Seasons" in the gui when it opens,

 

https://dianne.skoll.ca/wiki/Earth_Seasons

 

3529f1.jpg

 

If anyone can help me solve my problem It would be gratefully accepted.

 

Remind and TkRemind are super programs and very useful and they work brilliantly with Window Maker 😎

Edited by abarbarian
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