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réjean
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réjean

Hi everyone! I just got a new computer (a Think Centre M93p) with a i5 processor, 500GB sata hard drive and 8 GM of memory ( I had 2x 4 GB around wich I added so I now have 16 GB ). It came with Windows 10. I want to install Ubuntu which I downloaded and put on a flash drive. 
When I start the machine it ignores the flash drive and boot Windows so I went into the BIOS and tried to set it up as the first boot and I noticed that everything is excluded except the Sata hard drive. I opened the machine but everything is so compact that I cannot even see the sata cable to unplug it.  What do you suggest?

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réjean

I just realized that I used to have 2 hardrives per machine so if I wasn't allowed to install a distro on the main one I would disconnect it, then install the dristo on the 2nd and later do a update-grub but I couldn't do that here. 
I vaguely remember that removing the battery for a few minutes would reset the bios. Could it work here?

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9 hours ago, réjean said:

Hi everyone! I just got a new computer (a Think Centre M93p) with a i5 processor, 500GB sata hard drive and 8 GM of memory ( I had 2x 4 GB around wich I added so I now have 16 GB ). It came with Windows 10. I want to install Ubuntu which I downloaded and put on a flash drive. 
When I start the machine it ignores the flash drive and boot Windows so I went into the BIOS and tried to set it up as the first boot and I noticed that everything is excluded except the Sata hard drive. I opened the machine but everything is so compact that I cannot even see the sata cable to unplug it.  What do you suggest?

Boot into the Bios and change which device you want to boot from.

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réjean

I cannot. It won't let me make changes.All the devices but the sata hardrive are set as excluded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Remove the battery on the motherboard and re-install it to reset the BIOS. If it still won't let you change the boot device after resetting the BIOS you motherboard has failed and is ready for the trash heap. 

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Hedon James

Strikers advice seems solid.  If his link doesn't help, I'm inclined to think you still have "secure boot" enabled.  Once you get secure boot disabled, you should be able to change the boot order.

 

https://pcsupport.lenovo.com/us/en/products/desktops-and-all-in-ones/thinkcentre-m-series-desktops/thinkcentre-m93p/solutions/ht509044-how-to-enable-secure-boot-on-think-branded-systems-thinkpad-thinkstation-thinkcentre

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raymac46

Yes I think that is the problem you have, as I have a Lenovo laptop which must be set to "Legacy and UEFI" in order to boot a USB key. Ubuntu should be able to deal with Secure Boot but it never hurts to disable it. Since you intend to dual boot I think you'll need to shrink your Windows partition so as to have room for Ubuntu.

https://itsfoss.com/install-ubuntu-1404-dual-boot-mode-windows-8-81-uefi/

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réjean

ok! So I tried Striker's suggestion and I now have the following:

under primary boot sequence;
CSM  [enabled]
Boot mode  [auto]

Boot priority  [legacy first]:Quick boot  [enabled]

 

under automatic boot sequence;

I have the SATA 1
and everything seems to be selected under Excluded from boot order except for the
USB KEY 1; Lexar USB Flash Drive 1100

 

same thing with the Error boot sequence. 

so because I am still booting into Windows I tried what Hedon James suggested and under security I set the Secure boot to [enabled]

 

and yet I am still rebooting into Windows. If I can manage to boot into Ubuntu and install it I will shrink the windows partition to 100 GB , then create a 100 GB partition for Ubuntu and make the extra space (300GB) into a NTFS partition for storage.
Thanks everyone and if you have other suggestions please let me know.

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Bookmem
22 hours ago, réjean said:

Hi everyone! I just got a new computer (a Think Centre M93p) with a i5 processor, 500GB sata hard drive and 8 GM of memory ( I had 2x 4 GB around wich I added so I now have 16 GB ). It came with Windows 10. I want to install Ubuntu which I downloaded and put on a flash drive. 
When I start the machine it ignores the flash drive and boot Windows so I went into the BIOS and tried to set it up as the first boot and I noticed that everything is excluded except the Sata hard drive. I opened the machine but everything is so compact that I cannot even see the sata cable to unplug it.  What do you suggest?

What show when you keep hitting the F12 key while powering on?  That should bring up a boot menu and show a list of bootable devices.  If the USB stick doesn't show, try putting it in a USB 2 slot rather than the USB 3.  If that doesn't work, it means USB booting isn't enabled in the BIOS.  Try these steps

 

To boot to Legacy devices:

Restart the PC and press F1 to enter Setup.
For ThinkPad: Navigate to the RESTART menu.
For ThinkCentre and ThinkStation: Navigate to the EXIT menu
Select OS Optimized Defaults and change the value to Disabled.
Select Yes to continue to disable the OS Optimized Defaults.
Press F9 to load Setup Defaults.
Select Yes to confirm the loading default configuration.
Press F10 to save and exit Setup.
If necessary, press F12 to access the boot menu and select your boot device.

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réjean
Posted (edited)

Hi Bookmen. I had tried the F12 key and at the time I could see only the SATA drive and Enter Setup, which I press and included the USB Flash Drive but it didn't change much.. I think the F9 key, however,  did the work because I am now in Ubuntu.  What a relief!!
So final question. Creating a 300 GB NTFS storage partition should be accessible from both OS right?

 

Edited by réjean
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securitybreach
1 hour ago, réjean said:

So final question. Creating a 300 GB NTFS storage partition should be accessible from both OS right?

 

As long as you install the ntfs-3g package

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Bookmem
1 hour ago, réjean said:

Hi Bookmen. I had tried the F12 key and at the time I could see only the SATA drive and Enter Setup, which I press and included the USB Flash Drive but it didn't change much.. I think the F9 key, however,  did the work because I am now in Ubuntu.  What a relief!!
So final question. Creating a 300 GB NTFS storage partition should be accessible from both OS right?

 

I understand you have two drives.  The latest Ubuntu should read any NTFS partitions but Windows would need additional app to read the Ubuntu ext4 partition.  I'd use the Windows Disk Manager to shrink the Windows main drive and install Ubuntu to that space.  Then use the second drive for any shared data.  The latest Linux kernels do a better job of accessing NTFS partitions than in the past, but its still slower than Windows.

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réjean
Posted (edited)

I have just one drive (500 GB) where I want to create 3 partitions, Windows (100 GB0, Ubuntu (100 GB) and a share folder NTFS (300 GB). I don't need Windows to see Ubuntu but if I can so much the better.

I should add that I don't intend to use Windows for anything beside the odd old game and to figure out if my wife has  any trouble with her Windows OS on her own computer.

 

Edited by réjean
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Bookmem
3 hours ago, réjean said:

I have just one drive (500 GB) where I want to create 3 partitions, Windows (100 GB0, Ubuntu (100 GB) and a share folder NTFS (300 GB). I don't need Windows to see Ubuntu but if I can so much the better.

I should add that I don't intend to use Windows for anything beside the odd old game and to figure out if my wife has  any trouble with her Windows OS on her own computer.

 

In that case, I'd partition the 300gb partition ext4 as well as the Ubuntu partition.  Access would be much faster from Ubuntu.  You can then use Ext2Fsd when you need to access it from Windows.

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réjean

Thanks Bookmem! I didn't know an ext4 partition could be used by windows. That's what I'll do tomorrow. I am still amazed that I have been using  live Ubuntu from the flash drive all day with no problems. I have been online, using Youtube, even Netflix. I was able to copy an old Office XP that I have on a CD-Rom unto a 2nd flash drive so I could install Word on my wife's new computer ( who is a bit of a luddite) which doesn't have a CD or DVD-RW. I guess having access to 16 GB of RAM helps a lot. 

 

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securitybreach

While ext2fsd worked, I remember having issues with it on the window's side. Of course, that was many years ago so probably works much better now.

 

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réjean
19 minutes ago, securitybreach said:

While ext2fsd worked, I remember having issues with it on the window's side. Of course, that was many years ago so probably works much better now.

 

I have been using ext4 for Linux for many years.

 

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securitybreach
46 minutes ago, réjean said:

I have been using ext4 for Linux for many years.

 

 

I was talking about the window's application ext2fs, not linux filesystems. I have been using ext4 for almost 20 years now.

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Bookmem
10 hours ago, securitybreach said:

 

I was talking about the window's application ext2fs, not linux filesystems. I have been using ext4 for almost 20 years now.

10 hours ago, securitybreach said:

 

 

 

 

10 hours ago, securitybreach said:

 

Yes, ext2fsd is much better today but that isn't the point.  Even if it were barely usable in Windows,  having things work right in Unbuntu, the daily goto OS, is much more important than something working poorly in the OS you only use once in a while. 

Edited by Bookmem
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securitybreach
6 hours ago, Bookmem said:

 

 

Yes, ext2fsd is much better today but that isn't the point.  Even if it were barely usable in Windows,  having things work right in Unbuntu, the daily goto OS, is much more important than something working poorly in the OS you only use once in a while. 

 

And if you read the comments, you would of noticed that I answered that 16 hours ago ;)

 

16 hours ago, securitybreach said:

 

As long as you install the ntfs-3g package

 

Also, your comment above tripled the quote. Can you please edit it and fix the reply?

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abarbarian
On 4/23/2022 at 6:44 PM, réjean said:

Hi everyone! I just got a new computer (a Think Centre M93p) with a i5 processor, 500GB sata hard drive and 8 GM of memory ( I had 2x 4 GB around wich I added so I now have 16 GB ). It came with Windows 10. I want to install Ubuntu which I downloaded and put on a flash drive. 
When I start the machine it ignores the flash drive and boot Windows so I went into the BIOS and tried to set it up as the first boot and I noticed that everything is excluded except the Sata hard drive. I opened the machine but everything is so compact that I cannot even see the sata cable to unplug it.  What do you suggest?

 

Lenovo M93 Ultra Small PC Running Linux – Week 1

 

The above article may be helpful or interesting to you. They mention the "F1" key to access a SETUP facility,

 

Quote

hold down the F1 key at boot up. This will take you into the Setup Utility. We need to change the boot order so that the machine boots from the flash key/optical media. In the Lenovo BIOS Setup Utility, select the Startup menu. Here you’ll see the Primary Boot Sequence. There’s various entries listed below the SATA 1 entry including USB FDD, USB KEY, Network, Other Device, USB HDD, and USB CDROM. Use the x key to include an entry that’s currently excluded from the boot order, and move it to the top. Then save the settings by pressing F10.

 

😎

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On 4/23/2022 at 8:41 PM, réjean said:

I cannot. It won't let me make changes.All the devices but the sata hardrive are set as excluded.

 

 

 

 

is there a large image missing from the post? Almost a full web page of nothing followed "excluded."

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