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Dead Inkjet


raymac46
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Inkjets - you never think about them till you need to use them. They work until they don't.

My HP Envy Photo Printer wouldn't turn on today. Blue screen and error 00829C98. The advice was to do a hard reset so after about 20 attempts I gave up. I have noticed that it was taking longer and longer to boot, and the paper transport mechanism was making some buzzy noises when I tried to print anything. So my guess is some sort of hardware failure.

Much as I don't want to buy another HP I probably will. I just like the comfort level I get that an HP printer is going to work with Linux. Aside from drip coffee makers I don't know another appliance which has such a short working life and causes as much aggravation as an inkjet. :wacko:

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securitybreach

Well HP has been the most supported printer manufactures on Linux for well over 15 years now. Inkjet do last the longest but when they die, they die... Good luck on getting one at a decent price.

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Not many in stock either. I did find one at Amazon but I'll have to wait until January 5 to get delivery. I want an AIO but I don't need a document feeder or fax capability. I print the odd photo as well.

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Over the years I have learned a few things about inkjets. 

 

1. If you buy those super cheap models, you will be lucky if it lasts a day after the warranty wears out. 

2. When it comes to those super cheap models, the makers make their money in replacement inks. 

3. When it comes to those super cheap models, you have much better service with the genuine inks. 

4. To extend service lifetime, print "something" once a week, and if a color printing device, make sure that "something" uses all the colors. A printer status page typically is fine for that. 

5. Never, as in NEVER EVER install the software package that comes with the printing device. Instead, download and install the basic driver package from the manufacturer (if Windows does have native drivers built in). 

6. Buy a device that has built in network support and an integrated web server. Many devices have network support, but not all of those have some sort of embedded print server. These functions allow you to access the scanning and fax features, as well as integrated maintenance tools of the device through your standard browser. The embedded server is also what makes NOT installing the makers bloated spyware... err... software package. 

7. Avoid devices with consolidated ink cartridges (where 2 or more colors are in a single cartridge). NOBODY consistently prints documents that use the same amount of cyan, magenta and yellow. Such cartridges invariably result in running out of one color long before the other colors. This results in wasting ink. 

8. Inkjet ink has a shelf-life. This is true even with new, unopened, sealed packages of ink. Therefore, take care about buying replacement cartridges too far ahead of your needs. If considering one of those attractive "tank" type printers, don't - unless you print a lot. 

9. Inkjet inks are actually very high-tech, and proprietary formulas. They are NOT just a bunch of raw pigments mixed into some suspension liquid. And only the original printer makers guarantee consistency in their inks, batch after batch, year after year. Aftermarket ink makers, who have to reverse engineer the inks, do not guarantee such consistency between batches. Not only that, each aftermarket maker has their own formula and manufacturing process. Therefore, inks between different aftermarket brands are not consistent either. 

 

Setting aside the debate over using genuine vs aftermarket inks (because that debate is irrelevant and anecdotal here, and will only divert the thread off-topic :() all I will say there is "IF" you choose to use aftermarket inks, I strongly recommend you stick with one brand. That is, if you use LD Products, Walmart, or Best Buy as examples, stick with the same brand, or go back to the genuine OEM ink. 

 

Caveat - I have not a bought an inkjet "printer" in decades. Only multi-function printing (MFP) devices (printer, copier, fax and scanner). So that is where my experience ends. 

 

I too prefer HP, but when my current one finally dies, I will seriously consider Brother. 

 

 

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I agree with pretty much all of the above. An all in one is the way to go as I often need to scan either old photos or a document for emailing. My HP Envy 7155 was in my opinion the best inkjet I have had - sadly it failed after 3 years. However I think I'll replace it with the same model. It does a particularly nice job with photos.

Brother is a rather interesting possibility, but as I have a number of Linux based machines I would have to be careful to get one that works OK with Linux. That is hardly ever a problem with HP.

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I would caution about buying another 7155 and advise against it unless it is still in production. This is because HP (and the other makers too) is notorious :( for phasing out ink cartridge models as they retire and cease production of their legacy products. 

 

When that happens, owners are forced to go with aftermarket inks. But even that market will "dry up" (pun intended) because demand will drop as those printers die, plus aftermarket ink suppliers rely heavily on recycled cartridges. And that supply will dry up too. 

 

If the 7155 (or other devices that use that same cartridge) is still in current production, then you probably are fine for a few years. But if HP is no longer making devices that use that cartridge, I would look to something newer. 

 

I would be unhappy if my HP died after just 3 years. My current HP Photosmart 7525 is coming up on 7 years old and still serves my purposes well. The only problem is the automatic document feeder "slips" and does not feed in papers to be copied or scanned anymore. But I can manually copy, fax and scan them fine on the flatbed. Fortunately, I cannot remember the last time I needed to copy a large (more than a couple pages) document or else this problem would not be acceptable. 

 

I have a friend who has a Brother B&W laser he uses with Linux. Sorry, I don't know which version of Linux or which Brother model number, but I know he is happy with the setup. 

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Both the 7155 and its big brother the 7855 are still in production and use the HP 64 cartridges. The 7855 has a document feeder and fax capability which I do not need. Right now it doesn't appear that HP has a newer model or I'd go that way. The 7155 has been upgraded a bit to use dual wifi.

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I've recycled the old printer and I have to wait a bit before I can get a replacement. Fortunately the only major print job I had - print out a 12 month fridge calendar with my chosen photography - was completed before the printer quit working.

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raymac46

Forgot to mention that I do have a 20-year-old HP Deskjet 5550 downstairs, hooked up by USB to my Linux desktop system. It's painfully slow, not network discoverable, can't copy or scan. But it's built like a tank, uses cheap remanufactured cartridges and works fine with Linux. I let the grandkids print cartoons or coloring pages with it. It's pretty bad at photo printing but at least I can print documents. So I do sorta have a backup.

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securitybreach
3 minutes ago, raymac46 said:

Forgot to mention that I do have a 20-year-old HP Deskjet 5550 downstairs, hooked up by USB to my Linux desktop system. It's painfully slow, not network discoverable, can't copy or scan. But it's built like a tank, uses cheap remanufactured cartridges and works fine with Linux. I let the grandkids print cartoons or coloring pages with it. It's pretty bad at photo printing but at least I can print documents. So I do sorta have a backup.

 

Very nice :thumbsup:

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I don't run linux so that might be the difference. My 5550 connected to my Win 7 desktop computer by USB,  can be used by the other three Windows 7 computers in the house as an available printer. I don't print photos so the printer is fine for my needs.

I'd like to know what remanufactured carts you use. I had to resort to buying a genuine HP black cart because the one I used just wouldn't work. It didn't seem to mind remanufactured color carts.

 

We do have an HP wifi AIO that all the computers have access to. When one seems to run low on ink, I'll switch to the other printer until I get a new cart. I don't like to stockpile carts.

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Digerati

I've had fairly good luck with LD Products ink with my HP (564XL inks). I say fairly good because there have been some problems over the years. However, I cannot be sure that is not due to the way those 564 cartridges are designed. They have a very tiny little clip that hooks a lip. Force to hold that clip (and the cartridge) firmly in place is applied by a long, plastic lever on the cartridges. Even in the best of conditions, this lever is too weak to apply much force. Consequently, I have had several cartridges that failed to stay inserted properly. 

 

In all fairness to LD Products, I have experienced the exact same problem with genuine HP cartridges. This is why I blame the design. The problem with 3rd party inks is they use recycled cartridges and in those used cartridges, sometimes that plastic lever "feels" like it provides even less force. 

 

Having said all that, in each case where one of the LD Products failed, a quick contact through their LiveChat support resulted in a free replacement (with free "express" shipping). So no complaints there. 

 

I will also note that over the years with many many printing devices where users experienced various printing problems, very often those problems vanished immediately by replacing 3rd party inks with genuine OEM. 

 

Again, as I noted above, only the original makers can guarantee consistent quality batch after batch after batch. 

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securitybreach

Also note, newer HP printers will only accept HP cartridges (going by the ones that we have at work).

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Digerati

That supposedly has been fixed. 

 

HP got in big trouble over this here in the US and in the EU. Consumers cannot be forced into using genuine (and very expensive) OEM inks. Check your settings for a "Cartridge Protection" feature and disable it if you want to use 3rd party inks. If no option to disable it, there should be a firmware update. 

 

HOWEVER - if the printers are still under warranty, there is good reason to keep using genuine inks. The problem is, there is no way for the printer makers to ensure 3rd party inks are of equal or better quality as the genuine OEM stuff. Nor is there any requirement or law (or assurance for us consumers) that says 3rd party ink is of equal or better quality, or even 100% compatible or safe to use on our printing devices. 

 

For this reason, if you use 3rd party inks on your HP (or Epson, Brother, Canon, etc.) and it breaks, the printer makers may void the warranty and refuse to repair it under warranty if there is evidence the 3rd party ink had a role in breaking it. 

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HP and Keurig got into trouble concerning their lockout of 3rd party supplies [ just to bring the thread back to coffeemakers and printers :) ]

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I was using LD and was happy but I've had issues lately and the 5550 wasn't working with them so I'm not buying LD carts any more. That's why I'd like to know who Raymac buys from.

 

We have a Cartridge World outside our town and I went there. The printer seemed okay with the carts I bought there.

 

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raymac46

Well I have had my ups and downs with recycled cartridges. With an old backup printer like this 5550 I am not about to use the OEM cartridges. Remember I live in Canada so my suppliers may be different. 

My experience with Coloretto has not been good. I got a two cartridge set for around $25 but although the black one worked well, the color one was totally DOA. Although the printer recognized it and reported that the ink level was fine, it just would not print any color at all.

Not worth returning both cartridges though as it was still cheaper to just use the black and junk the color. I had a better experience with Nuinko as the color cartridge worked fine. Same price. Even if you are just playing inkjet roulette it is still cheaper to use the remanufactured cartridges on an old printer.

However I agree with Bill that on a new printer you are better off to stick with the OEM, especially if you want to print photos.

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raymac46

I suppose it would be possible to share the backup printer, but I don't have the desktop it's connected to running all the time. It's much handier to have a wifi printer on the network for both my Linux and Windows machines to connect to, That is my goal eventually once the replacement printer is available.

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Thanks Ray for some names.

I'll probably just go to Cartridge World and buy remanufactured. At least if the printer complains, I can return it.

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raymac46

Unfortunately I don't have a used cartridge store anywhere near me do I just have to order online and hope for the best. :happyroll:

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Cartridge World is more expensive than LD, online. But since the quality of LD has fallen down, at least from what I've recently purchased, it makes more sense to pay a bit more and be able to return locally.

 

Eric, thanks for yet another source to look at.

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