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Windows 11 Life Cycle


Corrine

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From Lifecycle FAQ - Windows:

New versions of Windows 11 will be released once per year. Customers should always install the latest version before the current version reaches end of servicing to remain supported by Microsoft.

Servicing Timeline will be 36 months with 1 release per year for the following versions:

     Windows 11 Enterprise
     Windows 11 Education
     Windows 11 IoT Enterprise

Servicing Timeline will be 24 months with 1 release per year for the following versions:

     Windows 11 Pro
     Windows 11 Pro Education
     Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
     Windows 10 Home*

*Home edition does not support the deferral of feature updates and will therefore typically receive a new version of Windows 11 prior to the end-of-servicing date shown.

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V.T. Eric Layton
4 hours ago, Corrine said:

New versions of Windows 11 will be released once per year. Customers should always install the latest version before the current version reaches end of servicing to remain supported by Microsoft.

 

 

I hate to say this, folks, but I do not know what's going on with MS when it comes to their Windows operating system. It's been difficult since 3.1 to get folks to upgrade their Windows when it became available. Many folks, and even businesses, ignore the upgrades as being to costly, difficult to perform, etc. Whether these apparent aggravations mentioned in the previous sentence are or were ever true isn't the point. The point is people are lazy. And for older folks who really aren't tech savvy, for the most part, this is a terrible burden on them; so, often it just doesn't get done.

 

I actually knew (back in 2008 or so) an older lady and her daughter who shared a computer in their home that was still running Win XP. It did have all the Service Packs because I installed them. However, these ladies (mom - 83, daughter 58) flat refused to use anything else. They didn't want for me to install Win 7. They wouldn't even consider Ubuntu, when I tried to talk them into that option. These folks might have been a bit extreme, but I'm sure there are others out there running Win 7 still. I actually know few of them, also.

 

Point is, I understand that MS is most likely doing things with 11 like this for security reasons. We all know that Windows is the favorite target of hackers, scammers, malware distributors, ID thieves, etc. So, it makes sense to me that MS is trying to do all they can in the most efficient fashion to keep folks' systems secure and useful. Sadly, upgrading is just as fun for most folks as remembering to check the tire pressure and get their engine oil changed on their cars. I just don't see a lot of folks keeping up with these yearly updates.

 

Thoughts, @Corrine? @goretsky? Other Win users or IT providers (for neighbors, family, and friends)?

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Hello,

 

Well, Microsoft has become a lot better about keeping computers up-to-date, so a lot of that is now just handled automatically. 

If the hardware is so old that it won't run a supported Microsoft operating system (Windows 8.1, Windows 10) I don't really have a great answer, though.  Get it onto the latest version of the OS that it can run, get that fully-updated, and lock it down as much as possible is one answer, but at some point, even that may be insufficient.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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Also consider the new releases that we've seen for Windows 10.  What they have mainly included are new features and design changes.  Bleeping Computer lists new features as well as features no longer developed in the Windows 10 21H1 version released in May in Windows 10 21H1 is released, these are the new features.  With features no longer being developed, it makes sense that there needs to be a cut-off date when older versions with those features are no longer supported.  

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My experiences helping out older users with Windows is mixed. Some (like Lillian) always wanted the latest and greatest software - even if her hardware struggled with it. Others wanted to run the default system until it broke and never wanted any changes. A few went for a Linux install but only if they couldn't afford a new system or they had a secondary PC that they didn't want to recycle. Even though they generally enjoyed Linux, they would always return to Windows given the opportunity with a newer machine. None had any technical ability so they never backed up, kept security up to date, etc. Don't even get me started with BIOS, MBR, UEFI...

My usual advice if they wanted an upgrade to a new Windows version was - get a new computer. These people in general can afford it, but migration was always a bear so I had to help them out. To be honest, I don't like migrating Windows to a new PC myself even though it isn't that difficult with backups, external drives, and cloning software. Rightly or wrongly I think Microsoft will get a lot of grief since there will be a lot of machines out there that can run Windows 10 that won't be running Windows 11.

From what I have read there are lots of workarounds to get beta versions of Windows 11 functioning with old hardware but I am not about to attempt that with anyone.

Regardless of appliance, O/S, etc. I still believe that computers are too complex for the people that want to use them.

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I might add that I am as guilty as anybody when it comes to combining old hardware and new software. I ran Windows 10 on a very old desktop until it simply would not update any longer. At this point I did get a new system that is Windows 11 capable.

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V.T. Eric Layton
13 hours ago, goretsky said:

so a lot of that is now just handled automatically. 

 

And that's probably a good thing. :)

 

1 hour ago, raymac46 said:

when it comes to combining old hardware and new software. I ran Windows 10 on a very old desktop

 

HA! I'm running Win 10 on my main machine which is a "Frankenputer" that I assembled from salvaged (mobo, CPU, etc.)  and some new parts (hdds, fans, vid card, etc.) back in 2016. It seems to work fine. I admit that I haven't connected Win 10 to the Internet lately for any updating, but I don't worry because the OS is crippled... no Networking enabled. This OS doesn't access the Internet normally. I just use it for gaming.

 

I don't think this machine is even capable of running Win 11, so I'm not going to bother.

 

---

 

In the near future, I see MS utilizing cloud computing and streamlined a Windows OS to eventually offer customers a "Chromebook" equivalent; just buy the device, turn it on, and log into your MS account - POOF! You're computerin'!

 

Technology evolves just like life. Eventually, that tiny brain chip implant (wetware) and 11G Wifi will enable us all to be "online" and connected constantly. YAY! I can hardly wait. ;)

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I found that with Sandy Bridge (not supported any longer) the latest version I could run was Win 10 1909. That is now past EOL. This desktop is now chugging along with Linux Mint 20.2 - connected, upgraded, secure enough.

As far as Windows 11 goes it is not final yet but it looks as if anything older than Intel 8 will not officially be supported, Also nothing older than Ryzen 2XXX. I guess we'll see.

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abarbarian
16 hours ago, V.T. Eric Layton said:

I'm pretty sure that eliminates my AMD Phenom II 1090 6-core cpu. ;)

 

Maybe not. This is a reply I made on another place,

 

Quote

So we are going to have to fork out for another Microsoft OS?

 


Only if you want to.Not only can you get Windows 11 for free you can even install it on older hardware.

"This PC can't run Windows 11"

Using the above Bookmen over at Scots used this Windows .iso

https://en.softonic.com/download/windows-11/windows/post-download

To install to,
 
Quote

I don't know whether MS is backing down or I just stumbled across a patched Win 11 iso but I downloaded the one from Softonic and it works on older hardware. It worked as a direct upgrade on my HP Elitebook with a gen 7 CPU. On a much older Athlon box, I had to do a clean install because the Win 10 install wasn't setup with secure boot. But the clean install, using the old Win 10 key, did install and activate.

 


:cool:

An if you are still runnin Windows 7 you may be able to upgrade to Windows 10 for free and the on to Windows 11.

https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-...ndows-10-for-free-now-that-windows-7-is-dead/

 

😎

An Windows 11 is most certainly influenced by KDE and Gnome. Apparently they were going to call it Micro Penguin :p

 
 
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Right now it appears you can bypass the Microsoft discouragement and install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware. But it's early days and we don't have the official release yet. It may happen that you'll reach a point where Windows 11 will not update and you'll be stuck without security support. That is what happened to me with Windows 10. The only alternative then is to update your hardware or switch over to Linux.

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V.T. Eric Layton
6 hours ago, abarbarian said:

An[d] if you are still runnin[g] Windows 7

 

Nah... running 10, but not in any hurry to go to 11; no need to, really. Thanks for the info, though. :)

 

P.S. Sorry, had to correct spellings in the quote above. It's a grammar/punctuation OCD thing. ;)

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abarbarian
14 minutes ago, V.T. Eric Layton said:

P.S. Sorry, had to correct spellings in the quote above. It's a grammar/punctuation OCD thing.

 

Nowt t fret ahbaht, but tha's ferg'tn tyke speak slips in 'cassianally. 😝

Edited by abarbarian
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V.T. Eric Layton
5 minutes ago, abarbarian said:

Nowt t fret ahbaht, but tha's ferg'tn tyke speak slips in 'cassianally. 😝

 

ARRRRRRRRRRRRGH! 🥃🥃🥃🥃🥃 Ahhh.... better now. ;)

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