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[arch-dev-public] Archinstall in [extra]


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Amazing enough, Archlinux is making a guided installer available in Extra repo:

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Fellow Archers,

As you might have noticed, archinstall[0] has been added to the [extra] repository.

 

Over the past months we have been discussing the potential addition of an installer to our installation medium internally with our staff. 

 

Dave mentioned archinstall in his archiso talk during Arch Conf[1], outlining why we think it might be a good fit for a non default TUI based installer for Arch. 

 

To make it easier for contributors to find and fix bugs when testing archinstall, before it is added to the installation medium as a package, we have added it to the repositories for ease of use.

 

Please note, that only installations done using the official installation guide are supported[2].

 

Installations done using archinstall are *unsupported* by our support staff until further notice.

 

Any issues with installations based on archinstall should be reported to upstream directly[3].

 

This might change in the future, and users will be informed accordingly.

 

Happy testing!

 

[1] https://github.com/Torxed/archinstall
[2] https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Installation_guide
[3] https://github.com/Torxed/archinstall/issues

 

 

https://lists.archlinux.org/pipermail/arch-dev-public/2021-January/030283.html

 

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It runs you through a set of questions in order to determine what the system should look like. Then the guided installer performs the required installation steps for you. Some additional steps might show up depending on your chosen input at some of the steps - those steps should be self explanatory and won’t be covered here.

 

https://python-archinstall.readthedocs.io/en/latest/installing/guided.html

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This installer will perform the following:

  • Prompt the user to select a disk and disk-password
  • Proceed to wipe the selected disk with a GPT partition table.
  • Sets up a default 100% used disk with encryption.
  • Installs a basic instance of Arch Linux (base base-devel linux linux-firmware btrfs-progs efibootmgr)
  • Installs and configures a bootloader to partition 0.
  • Install additional packages (nano, wget, git)
  • Installs a network-profile called workstation (more on network profiles in the docs

 

 

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Bit bloomin well late for me, I could have done with this a few weeks ago. :hysterical:

 

Sounds like a pretty neat idea. I wonder if more folk will be tempted to try out Arch ? 😎

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securitybreach

Well considering how little it does, I doubt that it would make anyone more tempted to use arch. It literally only helps with partitioning, bootloader, network and a few utilites.

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Arch would not be my choice as a new Linux user. That said, I believe that anyone with a basic appreciation of Linux structure and configuration can follow a cookbook like the Wiki install and get Arch working. It's instructive and fun.

Items like using the command line, knowing how to deal with disk partitioning, the difference between MBR and GPT, what Fstab is - are all things you'd want to know regardless of the distro you end up with.

 

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54 minutes ago, raymac46 said:

Arch would not be my choice as a new Linux user. That said, I believe that anyone with a basic appreciation of Linux structure and configuration can follow a cookbook like the Wiki install and get Arch working. It's instructive and fun.

Items like using the command line, knowing how to deal with disk partitioning, the difference between MBR and GPT, what Fstab is - are all things you'd want to know regardless of the distro you end up with.

 

 

I 100% agree. I love Archlinux but I would never suggest it to a beginner penguin, as it would only leave a bad impression of Linux. It is a DIY distro for those who want to manually configure their system to fit their needs.

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2 hours ago, raymac46 said:

Arch would not be my choice as a new Linux user. That said, I believe that anyone with a basic appreciation of Linux structure and configuration can follow a cookbook like the Wiki install and get Arch working. It's instructive and fun.

Items like using the command line, knowing how to deal with disk partitioning, the difference between MBR and GPT, what Fstab is - are all things you'd want to know regardless of the distro you end up with.

 

I use Mint but the first thing I do after installing it is to install gparted.  I already know about MBR, GPT, fstab, grub config etc.  I also know ARCH is much more customized in what gets installed.  But with todays cost of hardware being what it is, I really don't care about all of the extras, that I'll never use, that get installed by Mint.  Just glad Mint no longer installs all of the "language packs" by default.  I get real aggressive about "debloating" my Android tablets, but with desktops, I just don't find it worth the bother.  Each of my desktops has a 128gb M.2 SSD "boot disks" and then HDDs for data.  The SSDs have never even come close to running out of room, so "debloating" isn''t really an issue.

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5 minutes ago, Bookmem said:

I use Mint but the first thing I do after installing it is to install gparted.  I already know about MBR, GPT, fstab, grub config etc.  I also know ARCH is much more customized in what gets installed.  But with todays cost of hardware being what it is, I really don't care about all of the extras, that I'll never use, that get installed by Mint.  Just glad Mint no longer installs all of the "language packs" by default.  I get real aggressive about "debloating" my Android tablets, but with desktops, I just don't find it worth the bother.  Each of my desktops has a 128gb M.2 SSD "boot disks" and then HDDs for data.  The SSDs have never even come close to running out of room, so "debloating" isn''t really an issue.

 

Yeah, I always prefer to install what I want versus having to go back and remove all the extras that I will never use from my system. While that is much easier for a lot of people, I just prefer to do it my way/archway.

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2 hours ago, securitybreach said:

 

Yeah, I always prefer to install what I want versus having to go back and remove all the extras that I will never use from my system. While that is much easier for a lot of people, I just prefer to do it my way/archway.

Everyone has their own preferences.  But like is said, on my desktops, I just don't bother removing the bloat. Unlike on a tabket, it isn't taking up enough resources for me to even notice.

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