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V.T. Eric Layton

MS Win 10 (64 bit) Upgrade

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V.T. Eric Layton

I'm going to take the Win 10 plunge on my main system sometime this week. Already downloaded and waiting on me to install.

 

Wish me luck! :)

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raymac46

It should be fairly painless. I have done it from Windows 7 and also Windows 8.1. The only problem that any of my "clients" have had was with an early EFI setup where the boot partition wasn't large enough and the upgrade failed. This was on an Acer all in one.

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V.T. Eric Layton

I have no UEFI, EFI or any of that on this system. Will that be a problem for me?

 

Also, does the upgrade retain your already installed applications? Or should I do a clean install? I really only have one priority piece of software to install in Windows (a game).

 

 

.

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abarbarian
7 hours ago, V.T. Eric Layton said:

I have no UEFI, EFI or any of that on this system. Will that be a problem for me?

 

Also, does the upgrade retain your already installed applications? Or should I do a clean install? I really only have one priority piece of software to install in Windows (a game).

 

 

.

 

Windows should take care of all your partitioning if you do a fresh install, obviously doing that will wipe all previous data and applications. If you plan to do dual booting at some time in the future then make sure that your EFI FAT32 partition is 200 MB or larger. If you are just using the pc with W 10 then on a fresh install Windows will create a EFI partition of suitable size.

 

I personally would do a fresh install. Mind you I have a 250 GB partition set up for W10 and have W10 downloaded and on a usb stick and have been trying to pluck up the courage to do an install for several months.Thing is an install of MX-19 or even vanilla Arch would be miles quicker than a unknown W10 install so I am teetering on the brink as it were.

As a Slackware user you probably have the right mind set for tackling a W10 install. 😂

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raymac46

One of my machines had EFI and the other was legacy. Both upgraded OK. The only issue I had was that the wifi on the EFI laptop didn't work as well after the upgrade. All my data and apps survived the update although I was careful to back up anything critical like docs and photos.

If all you have to worry about is a game and you can reinstall it, I would agree with Erik that a fresh install is the way to go.

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V.T. Eric Layton

Well, that was 1/2 a day shot to heck. Have I mentioned lately that

 

I ABSOLUTELY HATE MS WINDOWS!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

EVERYTHING is SOOOOOOOOOO SLOWWWWWWWWWW!

 

- Microsoft servers

- bootable USB creation

- formatting and preparation

- actual installation

- setup

 

BAH! :rant:

 

OK, here's what finally happened.

 

Firstly, I could not download and create a bootable USB in Slackware because the Win 10 ISO kept stopping at about 4.3Gig when trying to copy it to the USB. Numerous tries with numerous USB flash drives; it was the same issue each time. OK, fine... I deleted the downloads in Slack. I cleared the USB drive.

 

I then booted my carpy, slow, Win 7 installation and spent about an hour trying to get my Network back up and running so I could download using the MS Windows auto-installer. Once the Network was up, I went to MS and downloaded (very slowly) the auto-installer. I then let it format the USB and add the Win 10 files and other horse manure.

 

Once that was done -- I actually cooked and ate a four-course breakfast while waiting for MS Windows to create this USB installer. OK, then... reboot and wait, wait, wait, for the installer to load. Once that was done, then I chose my Win 7 partition for format and installation. Format went OK, but installer could not install on my chosen partition.

 

Why not? SIMPLY BECAUSE MS WINDOWS MUST -- MUST THROUGHOUT THE UNIVERSE -- MUST be located on the first partition of the first drive on the system. I had forgotten that. Darn. :( This means that because my system has four drives on it and the Windows drive is THIRD, not FIRST, I had to disconnect my other three drives in order for this install to work.

 

OK. After another hour or so of watching my beard grow and get grayer, MS Win 10 is FINALLY installed on my system. YAY!

 

Now, since I had the system all apart and it was all dusty and cat-haired up, I thought I'd take it outside to the shop to blow the detritus out of it. I should follow my own advice that I give people: Never clean stuff. It never works after you clean it. And that's exactly what happened. I brought it back inside all nice and clean... no boot, no code beeps, just fans. *HEAVY SIGH*

 

After a couple smokes and nail-biting out on the porch, I came back in and wiggled, tightened all connections inside and out. YAY! Slackware booted and here I am. It's sad. I just don't have the patience for this stuff anymore these days. :(

 

I have a Win 10 installed. I'm not sure what I'm going to do with it, though. I'm so sick of MS just from today's experience, I don't want to see that Windows start up screen for a while, I don't think. :(

 

And that's how my MS Windows 10 installation went. I sure hope using the OS is not nearly as frustrating.

 

I'm off... It's too early to drink. I'll have to find solace elsewhere.

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V.T. Eric Layton

Well, at least it rebooted later this afternoon when I woke from my nap. I'm in Win 10 now using MS Edge to access Scot's. YAY! Shortly after doing all my customizing and setups, I'll be disabling Networking on this baby and won't have any outside access with this Windows unless I choose to re-enable Networking (as needed). Also, YAY!

 

Well, I'm off...

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goretsky

Hello,

 

I always recommend doing a clean install versus upgrading an older version of Windows.  Even though Windows 10 is pretty good about getting things right these days, I find that any system which is old enough to have a previous operating system on it is likely to be old enough that is has problems that are likely to carry over from the previous OS installation.

Given how network connected things are right now I'm not sure how much you will be able to do without a network connection, but it should allow you to experiment with the operating system, practice PowerShell scripting, etc.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

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V.T. Eric Layton

Thanks, Aryeh... but I really don't do anything in Windows this past 15 or so years except gaming and sending an occasional FAX. I have no interest in learning the ins and outs of Win 10 or any future versions of Windows.

 

I hate to sound so negative about MS Windows, but I really don't care for the operating system at all. Haven't liked it since that multiple service pack abortion in XP back in the mid-2006.

 

Also, for all you MS Windows folks reading this thread... if it angers you to read my thoughts on MS Windows, I apologize. No, really... I'm serious. If you like Windows, that's all OK with me. Use whatever tools work best for you. MS did a lot of good things over the decades to increase and assist folks to get more involved in computers and the Internet. I have to give them their due.

 

Regards, all...

 

~E.

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sunrat
On 4/30/2020 at 2:43 AM, V.T. Eric Layton said:

Well, that was 1/2 a day shot to heck. Have I mentioned lately that...

 

Firstly, I could not download and create a bootable USB in Slackware because the Win 10 ISO kept stopping at about 4.3Gig when trying to copy it to the USB. Numerous tries with numerous USB flash drives; it was the same issue each time. OK, fine... I deleted the downloads in Slack. I cleared the USB drive...

Now, since I had the system all apart and it was all dusty and cat-haired up, I thought I'd take it outside to the shop to blow the detritus out of it. I should follow my own advice that I give people: Never clean stuff. It never works after you clean it. And that's exactly what happened. I brought it back inside all nice and clean... no boot, no code beeps, just fans. *HEAVY SIGH*

1/2 a day? Last time I installed Win 10 it only took 4 hours. Oh wait... that is half a working day. Add a few more hours to remove oceans of crud (tracking, telemetry, unwanted applications) from it and whip it into shape, yeah, half a day.

I learned then it doesn't work to dd W10 image like for Linux installers. Using the Win utility is the easiest way although I read it's possible in Linux but you need to add syslinux boot loader to the USB drive or something.

Blowing detritus out is a big mistake as it blows detritus in to little hard-to-reach places as well and dislodges connections. I always vacuum. Carefully.

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raymac46

Although I prefer to use Linux I do maintain a couple of Win 10 installs here. One is Windows 10 Home on a recently acquired notebook and the other is Windows 10 Pro on an older desktop. I figure since so many of my senior friends will use Windows I should try to set an example of how to do it right so I can help them if they don't. Does that make sense?

Windows 10 is generally a good version and if you have an SSD and plenty of RAM it runs pretty well. I pay for security and I am careful when browsing so I haven't had too many malware issues. I have only 4-5 simulation games and they are really Windows only - too complicated to run in VMs or with an emulator. My favorite photo organizer is ACDSee which again is a Windows app. I do my taxes in Windows because I don't want to mess up the Netfile capability for sending in my return.

I set Windows 10 up to look like Windows 7 because I don't like all the apps and tiles. Open Shell is your friend. I also run as many FOSS programs as possible so switching back and forth to Linux is seamless.

If I build anything new or get an older machine I just go with Linux.

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V.T. Eric Layton
16 hours ago, sunrat said:

although I read it's possible in Linux but you need to add syslinux boot loader to the USB drive or something.

 

Yeah, I've made bootable thumb drives for Win in Linux before, I just couldn't remember how to do it, so did their version. It was slowwwww, but it worked. :)

 

4 hours ago, raymac46 said:

Does that make sense?

 

Absolutely, Ray. When I was doing family/friends IT over the years, it was necessary for me to keep up with changes in Windows; nowadays, not so much of that going on, though. I converted most family/friends to Linux years ago. I'm like the Maytag repairman these days. ;)

 

4 hours ago, raymac46 said:

If I build anything new or get an older machine I just go with Linux.

 

Yeah, most folks who know me and my attitude toward MS are shocked to find that I have a Win installation on my main computer. Meh... the Linux is for anything of importance, though.

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