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Antergos Linux Project Ends


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It was a nice project. Unlike other derivatives, Antergos always stuck to the vanilla repos for packages and only added their own custom repo for branding (themes, icons and such). So an experienced Archlinux user could use Antergos for a quick setup and then remove the Antergos parts right afterwards without any problems. Just like they explain in their farewell message.

 

What started as a summertime hobby seven years ago quickly grew into an awesome Linux distribution with an even more awesome community around it. Our goal was to make Arch Linux available to a wider audience of users by providing a streamlined, user friendly experience including a safe place for users to communicate, learn, and help one another. There have been 931,439 unique downloads of Antergos since 2014 (when we began keeping track). We think it’s safe to say we’ve accomplished our goal.

 

Today, we are announcing the end of this project. As many of you probably noticed over the past several months, we no longer have enough free time to properly maintain Antergos. We came to this decision because we believe that continuing to neglect the project would be a huge disservice to the community. Taking this action now, while the project’s code still works, provides an opportunity for interested developers to take what they find useful and start their own projects.

 

For existing Antergos users: there is no need to worry about your installed systems as they will continue to receive updates directly from Arch. Soon, we will release an update that will remove the Antergos repos from your system along with any Antergos-specific packages that no longer serve a purpose due to the project ending. Once that is completed, any packages installed from the Antergos repo that are in the AUR will begin to receive updates from there.

 

The Antergos Forum and Wiki will continue to be available until such time it becomes clear that users have moved on to other projects. However, we do not anticipate keeping the forum and wiki operational for more than three months.

 

We want to thank you for all of your support over the years. While working on this project, we’ve learned many invaluable skills that have vastly improved both our personal and professional lives. For that we will always be grateful.

 

 

-Dustin, Alex, & Gustau

 

https://antergos.com/blog/antergos-linux-project-ends/

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I installed Antergos in a VM for a while, and I liked it. However it always seemed to me that it was a bit unnecessary. It lacked all the "gee-whiz" features of Manjaro (if that's your bag.)

And let's face it. If you are an experienced user (or if you can follow a cookbook) it isn't all THAT difficult to install the real deal. So all Antergos could offer was a little easier install.

Edited by raymac46
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That was kind of the whole point of Antergos, to provide an installer for Archlinux. Unlike Manjaro, Antergos used the Archlinux repos and followed the same update path. Antergos did not patch or hold back packages like Manjaro does.

 

With Antergos, you actually had an Archlinux installation unlike Manjaro, which gives you a Manjaro installation. Antergos was literally Archlinux with a default set of apps, an installer and some themes/icons.

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I hear what you are saying. If it's worthwhile to have "Arch without the hassle" then I am sure somebody will fork Antergos or the community will keep it alive. I prefer to go through the learning curve of a real Arch install, but I can appreciate there may be some who do not want to do that. Whether there is a large enough group is the question.

Manjaro is a different beast altogether.

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I hear what you are saying. If it's worthwhile to have "Arch without the hassle" then I am sure somebody will fork Antergos or the community will keep it alive. I prefer to go through the learning curve of a real Arch install, but I can appreciate there may be some who do not want to do that. Whether there is a large enough group is the question.

Manjaro is a different beast altogether.

 

 

Well I have always thought that Antergos was good for seasoned archers who understand what they are doing but need a fast install/setup.

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Antergos offered Openbox as one of the desktop choices. I was interested in trying an Openbox-only Arch setup. I'd already done some Arch installations, and I'd also run some other Arch derivatives, when I tried Antergos (I've felt all along -- and I still feel -- that Manjaro isn't for me). At that time, I had never installed Arch without a full desktop environment. I thought it would be too hard for me to do. That along with the fact that Antergos was very close to "straight" Arch (as far as packages and repos, etc.) drew me to Antergos.

 

Post-install, I was able to run Antergos almost exactly like I ran "straight" Arch. I thought it was a very nice distro. I used it for some months, and took some notes. After a while, I replaced the Antergos Openbox system -- I did a new Arch installation, and added Openbox myself (also added Fluxbox later). Typing this from that Arch installation.

 

I really liked Antergos, but for me, it usually turns out best if I run "the real deal" -- the parent distro. Too many derivative distros I've run in the past have folded. I'm sad to see that this has happened with Antergos, but I'm not totally surprised.

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more like a remaster with an installer than a derivative

 

 

Perhaps both a remaster and a derivative distro? Anyway, I would have preferred something closer to "stock" Openbox than what Antergos shipped with, but that's me. Still, Antergos was definitely one of the better distros I've spent time with; sorry to see it come to an end.

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I think we can all agree that if you want to run Arch you may as well "bite the bullet" and install it using the recommended method. Besides, it's fun to do and you really learn a lot. Once installed it's amazingly stable considering how many updates you encounter.

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securitybreach

I think we can all agree that if you want to run Arch you may as well "bite the bullet" and install it using the recommended method. Besides, it's fun to do and you really learn a lot. Once installed it's amazingly stable considering how many updates you encounter.

 

 

One of the reasons is that Arch doesn't make distro specific patches, so you get the vanilla application just as the developer intended.

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I think we can all agree that if you want to run Arch you may as well "bite the bullet" and install it using the recommended method. Besides, it's fun to do and you really learn a lot. Once installed it's amazingly stable considering how many updates you encounter.

 

 

One of the reasons is that Arch doesn't make distro specific patches, so you get the vanilla application just as the developer intended.

 

 

That's the thing that has surprised me most about Arch -- it's remarkably stable over time, especially for a rolling-release distro. But there are times when it sure is nice to have a quick and easy way to install an Arch-like system; Antergos was a good way to go, for those situations.

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