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Arch Linux for WSL is now Available in the Microsoft Store

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Fans of the Windows 10 Subsystem for Linux (WSL) will be happy to learn that the Arch Linux distribution is now available from the Microsoft Store.

 

Since Windows 10 has been released, Microsoft has been increasingly focused on integrating Linux into the Windows 10 operating system. For example, WSL2 was announced last week at MS Build 2019 and includes a true Linux kernel that will allow a greater amount of Linux applications to be compatible.

 

They have also announced a new Windows Terminal application coming this summer that acts as a tabbed interface where you can launch a variety of different shell, including PowerShell, the traditional CMD prompt, and shells associated with installed WSL distributions.

 

Linux distributions have also been quick to create their own WSL distributions so that Windows users can more easily become familiar with Linux.

 

Before you can install the WSL Arch Linux distribution, you first need to install the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/microsoft/arch-linux-for-wsl-is-now-available-in-the-microsoft-store/

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Very interesting. That article makes it look like it would be very easy to do! It would be fun to play around with WSL, I think, but I haven't used Windows at home for several years, since XP days.

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Super dooper news. Love the last few words of the article.

 

For Windows users who have never tried Linux, or Arch Linux, using WSL is a great way to get introduced to a new operating system. You never know, you may like it so much you create your own dedicated Linux PC.

 

:hysterical: :hysterical:

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Boy, I'd love to see the reaction of my Windows friends when they read this!

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OK, I'm just the suspicious type...

 

There's just something very wrong about Microsoft offering alternative operating systems for their customers. I have a feeling this will come to no good. There's an ulterior (profit-driven) motive here somewhere. :(

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OK, I'm just the suspicious type...

 

There's just something very wrong about Microsoft offering alternative operating systems for their customers. I have a feeling this will come to no good. There's an ulterior (profit-driven) motive here somewhere. :(

I just pray they don't touch the penguin.

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OK, I'm just the suspicious type...

 

There's just something very wrong about Microsoft offering alternative operating systems for their customers. I have a feeling this will come to no good. There's an ulterior (profit-driven) motive here somewhere. :(

 

Well in that case, you may as well give up on using Linux as Microsoft is one of the biggest contributors to the Linux kernel. I know what you mean though...

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Yup, this isn't Ballmer's Microsoft anymore. Granted they are doing this to take advantage of the opensource tools but screw it, if it helps Linux in the long run, I am all for it.

 

Microsoft realizes that Linux already dominates every market, except for the Desktop market. I think they learned their lesson with Windows Phone/Mobile and Android.

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A bit long-winded, but meh...

 

I still say that regardless of all the speculating as to "why", the fact is that MS is about making $$$, ergo they think they're going to make $$$ off this move or they wouldn't be doing it. Bottom line is that everyone who's screamed and hollered about making Linux more popular, etc., is going to get their wish... not necessarily in a good way. More popular = bigger target on back.

 

I'm not worried, though. I don't think Slackware will be affected by this any time soon... if ever.

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A bit long-winded, but meh...

 

I still say that regardless of all the speculating as to "why", the fact is that MS is about making $$$, ergo they think they're going to make $$$ off this move or they wouldn't be doing it. Bottom line is that everyone who's screamed and hollered about making Linux more popular, etc., is going to get their wish... not necessarily in a good way. More popular = bigger target on back.

 

I'm not worried, though. I don't think Slackware will be affected by this any time soon... if ever.

 

I agree with you in that MS are going to try to make loads of loot from other folks unpaid work. An they will try to take total control of linux as well. Which is not a good thing at all so folk need to keep that in mind and act accordingly.

However if this move of theirs puts linux in the spot light and folk realise the value of linux and how versatile it is and how they can keep control of it and use it for free, which then leads to folk dropping MS products and the subsequent decline of the company, then that would be a great outcome.

I think we are at a tipping point, an who knows where we will end up. :228823:

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I do not think Microsoft is trying to take over anything. I think they see it as getting able to use free tools to help development. Microsoft wants to be a service company, not a maintainer. They did the same thing with edge when they moved to chromium source.

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Their main revenue stream is from their Azure cloud computing: Microsoft Build 2019: Azure is the star, and Windows is a bit player

 

https://www.theverge.com/2019/4/24/18513990/microsoft-q3-2019-earnings-surface-windows-xbox-revenue-profit

 

 

Unlike many other tech rivals, Microsoft has a very diverse business and revenue split for all of its products and services. Microsoft splits its businesses up into three main buckets, and they’re all roughly contributing the same amount of revenue this quarter (around 30 percent each).

“Productivity and Business Processes” makes up Office for business and consumer, along with LinkedIn and Microsoft’s Dynamics business. “Intelligent Cloud” includes Azure, server products, and enterprise services, and then finally it’s “More Personal Computing” that includes Windows, Xbox, and Surface.

:whistling:

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Microsoft is shifting everything to the cloud including windows development.

 

Microsoft announced a new reorganization yesterday. It’s the fourth major shuffle inside the company over the past five years, and the most significant of Nadella’s tenure. Microsoft is splitting Windows across the company, into different parts. Terry Myerson, a 21-year Microsoft veteran, is leaving the company and his role as Windows chief. The core development of Windows is being moved to a cloud and AI team, and a new team will take over the “experiences” Windows 10 users see like apps, the Start menu, and new features. There’s a lot of shuffling going on, but Nadella’s 1,300 word memo leaves little doubt over the company’s true future: cloud and AI.

 

https://www.theverge.com/2018/3/30/17179328/microsoft-windows-reorganization-future-2018

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I've noticed if I search Linux in the Windows 10 store it comes up with a few distros. Does it install a fully working OS? Is it a dual-boot situation where you can choose at startup? I've worked with Linux and Windows on the same system before but never actually installing it within a Windows app store like you can now.

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I've noticed if I search Linux in the Windows 10 store it comes up with a few distros. Does it install a fully working OS? Is it a dual-boot situation where you can choose at startup? I've worked with Linux and Windows on the same system before but never actually installing it within a Windows app store like you can now.

 

No, this is to give you linux tools in a console within Windows for development use.

 

The Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is a new Windows 10 feature that enables you to run native Linux command-line tools directly on Windows, alongside your traditional Windows desktop and modern store apps.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/faq

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Neat. If I had W 10 I would have a go at trying this out. :breakfast:

I have a Win10 but not going to pay bucks to run any free OS on it.

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It's kind or ironic considering last year's exploits (spectre and meltdown) along with the recent Zombieload:

In Intel's own words: "Clear Linux OS is an open source, rolling release Linux distribution optimized for performance and security, from the Cloud to the Edge, designed for customization and manageability."

 

https://www.forbes.c...t/#1499d06a5c49

 

I will download and take it for a spin in a vm though.

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