Jump to content
Fuddster

Today I Learned...

Recommended Posts

Fuddster

I used the backup software Back In Time to back up my /home folder during my recent openSUSE reinstall. Somehow I missed a setting, I still don't know which one, that allowed BIT to copy/restore more copies of my files with ".backup.fulldate" appended to each file.

 

OVER 250,000 OF THEM!

 

I use the find command often, so I opened a terminal and fired it up. To make sure my search pattern worked, I sent the results to a text file and gave it a quick look.

 

And Today I Learned that the find command has a -delete switch that made getting rid of those files a snap!

 

The full command went something like

find /home/fuddster/ -name "*.backup.20180721" -delete

 

Even with commands you use all the time, there's always something else you can learn about them.

 

What's your favorite AHA! moment like that?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
V.T. Eric Layton

Ah, yes... the command line. It's a wonderful thing. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ebrke

Well yesterday I learned the hard way never to assume. I was going to allow openSUSE to recreate my /home, so I copied files to a flash drive before my Leap 15 install. When I went to get my Thunderbird files, I found that .thunderbird and .mozilla had NOT been copied to the flash drive. First I thought I had stupidly not asked to copy hidden files, but I must have because I got .config, .cache, etc., just not what I really needed. Absolutely my own fault for not checking before starting the install, but still really aggravating. I dug around and found a .thunderbird backup that was about a year old, so at least got back most of my address book, but what a pain.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
saturnian

Today I learned that Linux Lite doesn't support UEFI: https://www.linuxlit...and-linux-lite/

 

I had been testing the latest release, running live sessions from a flash drive, but couldn't boot my two newer notebooks. Found the above link later.

 

Actually not a bad Xfce distro, overall, from what I'm seeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
saturnian

One of my favorite AHA! moments was finding out about using Ctrl+R to do a "reverse-i-search" through the command history.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abarbarian

One of my favorite AHA! moments was when I learnt that you could open a new tab in FF by middle clicking on an open space in the top bar, no more fiddling to hit the little cross. :Laie_95:

 

An a similar AHA! moment was when I learnt to copy by holding down the left mouse button and to paste in linux with a middle click. This trick has its down side as when I am in Windows it does not work and confuses the heck out of me poor old grey cell. :228823:

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sunrat

Some good tips. I usually use exec with find eg.:

find . -name "*.wmv" -type f -exec rm {} \;

 

And yes I hate it when middle button paste doesn't work in Windows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
saturnian

One of my favorite AHA! moments was when I learnt that you could open a new tab in FF by middle clicking on an open space in the top bar, no more fiddling to hit the little cross. :Laie_95:

 

 

AHA! I use Pale Moon, and this trick works with that browser as well! Thanks, abarbarian!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hedon James

TIL that educating prisoners may not be a good thing,

 

364 Idaho Inmates Hacked Their Prison Tablets for Free Credits

 

 

:Muahaha: :Laughing:

 

Haha! I saw that too! Goes to show that they CAN be "rehabilitated" through teaching of productive and useful skills, but we still can't rehabilitate their brain in order to use those skills for good.

 

Reminds me of that Stallone/Snipes movie "Demolition Man" where the convicted are frozen in pods, while their brains are re-programmed for societal integration. Stallone's overzealous cop character is taught knitting (presumably to help with relaxation?) while Snipes' psychopath character learns extensive electronics and computer programming. What could possibly go wrong with that?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abarbarian

TIL.

 

Create an alias for sudo with a space at the end:

 

alias sudo='sudo '

 

Then all other aliases will work with sudo.

 

As in

 

alias   w7=" sudo mount /dev/nvme0n1p3 /mnt"
alias   w7u=" sudo umount /dev/nvme0n1p3"

 

This allows me to mount and unmount my Windows 7 partition on the rare occasion I need to transfer some files.

 

:breakfast:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
raymac46

If you are editing /etc/fstab, say to configure an SSD you can make a typo or add a space and then completely bork your system boot. To check you have done this edit right issue the following terminal command BEFORE reboot.

 

$ sudo mount -a

 

If this works without error you are good to go. If not, fix /etc/fstab and try again until error-free.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pete!

Today I learned (the hard way) ..... synchronizing works both ways.

 

Just stuck my toe in the "Linux pool" by using "LICK" to do an easy dual boot with Puppy.

Rather than do all the work of setting up the included browser (Palemoon), I installed Firefox, and "synchronized".

 

Now, back on Windows, all the NoScript "trusted" sites are back in "default" mode, and stuff doesn't work until I put it back. :(

 

If the only things you want to synchronize are bookmarks and log-ins ...... UNCHECK EVERYTHING ELSE !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
raymac46

If you mess up /etc/fstab and are unable to boot to a GUI and fstab is now read-only, you can remount the fs as follows if you can get to a root shell in recovery mode:

 

mount -n -o remount -t ext4 /dev/sda1 /

 

You should then be able to use nano (or VIM) to edit your fstab file and get back to where you were before. Note depending on your setup the partition info and file system parameters may differ.

Edited by raymac46

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abarbarian

TIL about SWAY,

 

Quote

Sway is a tiling Wayland compositor and a drop-in replacement for the i3 window manager for X11. It works with your existing i3 configuration and supports most of i3's features, plus a few extras.

 

https://swaywm.org/

 

😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
securitybreach
1 hour ago, abarbarian said:

TIL about SWAY,

 

 

https://swaywm.org/

 

😎

 

Yeah, I would probably be using it if Wayland supported Nvidia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abarbarian
1 hour ago, securitybreach said:

 

Yeah, I would probably be using it if Wayland supported Nvidia.

 

Right your using nvidia drivers not the nouveau drivers. Posted in case anyone missed the news. 😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
securitybreach
7 hours ago, abarbarian said:

 

Right your using nvidia drivers not the nouveau drivers. Posted in case anyone missed the news. 😎

 

Well Noveau is ok if you just have one monitor and do not need graphic performance but other than that, it is not very good. Now its not noveau's fault as they are having to reverse engineer the nvidia driver as Nvidia doesn't share any of their code, hence the Linus gesture to them years back  https://www.wired.com/2012/06/torvalds-nvidia-linux/

 

4fdf5ea4eab8eadd1d000006?width=1190

 

On the other hand, AMD has a team dedicated to developing their open source driver along with the community.

 

  • +1 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...