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DKMS Error When Installing a Linksys WSUB6300


snminc
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Greetings to all,

Having recently upgraded to PCLOS 2017.11 64 bit I am trying to install a Linksys WSUB 6300.

 

Unfortunately I have encountered a DKMS error.

 

I've been using the following script, found on an Unbutu forum.

 

apt-get install git

git clone https://github.com/abperiasamy/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux

cd rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux

make

make install

 

Then reboot, insert the dongle and test. If there are any errors while running comands, then post them to your question.

To set it up permanently run these commands

 

cd ~/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux

make uninstall

make clean

cp -R ~/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux /usr/src/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux-1.0

dkms install -m rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux -v 1.0

 

The driver will be installed using DKMS.

If the driver is installed first time the commands are

 

apt-get install git

git clone https://github.com/abperiasamy/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux

cp -R rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux /usr/src/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux-1.0

dkms install -m rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux -v 1.0

 

However when I enter dkms install -m rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux -v 1.0

 

the following error message is generated

 

Error! DKMS tree does not contain: rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux-1.0

Build cannot continue without the proper tree.

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

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Hedon James

looks like your line:

 

dkms install -m rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux -v 1.0

 

is perhaps missing use of "sudo" to install. the way you typed it, i think your regular user is attempting to install and it can't find the dkms tree in the regular user directory structure, and/or the regular user doesn't have permission to write to that directory. try the following:

 

sudo dkms install -m rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux -v 1.0

 

and see if that gives you any satisfaction. otherwise, all I've got to offer is that I have had very good luck with Bolse USB wifi dongles...working on Windows, Mac, and Linux machines.

https://www.amazon.com/Network-adapters-300Mbps-Wireless-N-Adapter/dp/B00EZV8ZJI

 

I've also used the Bolse micro/nano adaptors, which are less obtrusive. I've had good experiences with both, FWIW.

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securitybreach

Why are things so difficult to set up on PCLos? I thought it was an easy to use distro?

 

On Arch, all you would have to do is run trizen -S rtl8812au-dkms-git

On Ubuntu, sudo apt-get install rtl8812au-dkms

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Does ~/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux actually contain a dkms.conf file?

 

apt-get install git

git clone https://github.com/a...AU_8821AU_linux

cp -R rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux /usr/src/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux-1.0

Are you running this from inside the ~/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux directory?

 

Try instead of the cp command:

dkms add .

then:

dkms install rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux/1.0

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My thanks to all for the advice offered.

 

PCLinuxOS is usually easy to use it's why I've stuck with it for so long.

 

Unfortunately they don't ship it with sudo capability (security reasons)

 

SO I tried to execute the script first posted using SU which lead to the files

been downloaded to a different location.

 

I've tried adding the sudo command without success, I can't seem to master editing visudo.

 

Then I decided to install Mint 18.3 as it runs on our netbook quite happily.

 

Alas there was an issue with the UEFI gremlin and the main PC couldn't boot into any OS.

 

Reinstalling PCLOS allowed access to Windows 10 but still cant connect wirelessly.

 

Another stab at installing Mint allows wireless access but didn't recognise Windows.

 

Decisions decisions...

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securitybreach
Unfortunately they don't ship it with sudo capability (security reasons)

 

Actually, if properly configured, sudo is much more secure than su to root. Sudo gives users access to a certain set of commands while su gives access to all commands. To give someone access to a restricted set of commands is more secure than giving them access to all commands. I set my systems to let sudo run certain things like updating but requires root to edit system configs. There are many arguments for and against sudo but I find using a hybrid of both allows you to fine comb the security of your systems.

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