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Hedon James

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Hedon James

Blimey all this huffin an puffin about features that have been around since time began. Window Maker has the tabbed windows and right click/keychain floating root menu.One day you all will realise what you are missing out on :Muahaha:

 

haha! touche! WindowMaker eh? Is that gtk2? I'm wondering how "future proof" WM might be, but if it's survived 20 years with basically the same interface, I'd say it's resisted the future better than most (all?) DE that have come before it?! :pirate:

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securitybreach

Blimey all this huffin an puffin about features that have been around since time began. Window Maker has the tabbed windows and right click/keychain floating root menu.One day you all will realise what you are missing out on :Muahaha:

 

haha! touche! WindowMaker eh? Is that gtk2? I'm wondering how "future proof" WM might be, but if it's survived 20 years with basically the same interface, I'd say it's resisted the future better than most (all?) DE that have come before it?! :pirate:

 

No doubt!! :hysterical:

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abarbarian

Blimey all this huffin an puffin about features that have been around since time began. Window Maker has the tabbed windows and right click/keychain floating root menu.One day you all will realise what you are missing out on :Muahaha:

 

haha! touche! WindowMaker eh? Is that gtk2? I'm wondering how "future proof" WM might be, but if it's survived 20 years with basically the same interface, I'd say it's resisted the future better than most (all?) DE that have come before it?! :pirate:

 

Not gtk2.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Window_Maker

 

 

Window Maker has a reputation for being fast, efficient and highly stable.[citation needed] Window Maker has been characterized as reproducing "the elegant look and feel of the NeXTstep GUI" and is noted as "easy to configure and easy to use."[4] A graphical tool called Wprefs is included and can be used to configure most aspects of the UI. The interface tends towards a minimalist, high performance environment directly supporting XPM, PNG, JPEG, TIFF, GIF and PPM icons with an alpha-channel and a right-click, sliding-scrolling application menu system which can throw off pinnable menus, along with window-icon miniaturization and other animations on multiple desktops. Menus and preferences can be changed without restarting. As with most window managers it supports themes and many are available. Owing to its NeXT inspiration, Window Maker has a dock like MacOS, but Window Maker's look and feel hews mostly to that of its NeXT forebear.

Architecture

 

Window Maker has window hints which allow seamless integration with the GNUstep, GNOME, KDE, Motif and OpenLook environments. Significantly it has almost complete ICCCM compliance and internationalization support for at least 11 locales. Window Maker uses the lightweight WINGs widget set which was built specifically for Window Maker as a way to skirt what its developers said would have been the "overkill" (or bloat) of using GNUstep.[5] WINGs is common to other applications including a login display manager called WINGs Display Manager (WDM) and many dockapps. Window Maker dock and clip applets are compatible with those from AfterStep's wharf.

History

 

Window Maker was written from scratch primarily by Brazilian programmer Alfredo Kojima as a window manager for the GNUstep desktop environment and originally meant as an improved take on the AfterStep window manager's design concept. The first release was in 1997.[6] For a time it was included as a standard window manager in several Linux distributions and is also available in the FreeBSD and OpenBSD ports collection.[7] Since the goal of the project has been to closely emulate the design of the defunct NeXTstep and OpenStep GUIs, further development has been light. In late 2007 the widely available, stable release version was at 0.92 from July 2005 with subsequent maintenance updates having been made to some distribution packages and ports.[8][9]

In late June 2008 a post on the project's website said active development would resume, noting, "...we are working very hard to revitalize Window Maker's presence on X Window (and perhaps beyond) desktops... We expect to once again provide the de-facto minimalist yet extremely functional window manager to the world."[10] On 29 January 2012, Window Maker 0.95.1 was released, making it the first official release in almost seven years. This was followed by a number of releases; As of October 2017 the latest release was 0.95.8, released on 11 March 2017.[11]

Name

 

The program's original name was WindowMaker (camelcased and without the space) but a naming conflict arose with an older product called Windowmaker from Windowmaker Software Ltd, a UK company producing software for companies that manufacture windows and doors. A 1998 agreement between the developers of Window Maker and Windowmaker Software specified that Window Maker (in the X sense) should never be used as a single word.

 

:breakfast:

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saturnian

Blimey all this huffin an puffin about features that have been around since time began. Window Maker has the tabbed windows and right click/keychain floating root menu.One day you all will realise what you are missing out on :Muahaha:

 

Yeah, Window Maker is very nice. Folks might be put off by it at first, thinking it looks out-dated and all that, but as with several other window managers I've tried, as you spend time with it you might be surprised (like I was) to find yourself enjoying it more and more. I think I'm addicted to Openbox and Fluxbox, though, and for now I'm kinda settled in with those two.

 

Man, I haven't played with Fluxbo (or openbox) in probably 10 years or more. Those were part of my journey to minimalism. I went from KDE 3.x to xfce to openbox to fluxbox to XMonad to i3. You get to a certain point where it has nothing to do with system resources but it is instead a mentality.

 

Wow, nice journey! And I agree, it does go beyond system resources!

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Hedon James

Agreed x3 on the system resources comment. I love Flux & Pek for the features that I want/need, all present natively in a single WM! ...but the extremely low system resource usage is a very nice bonus! How do you top that trifecta?

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