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How to enable user to use HD?


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Ok guys I give up.I read and read and read, and tweaked and wrote and reboted and who knows what else but no success.-My setup, Suse 8.2 loaded on single 20Gb disk-Aded second disk later 40 Gb, used partition tool in Suse's YAST2 and made 40Gb partition with Raiserfs.-First disk is hde with system and everything-Second disk is hdg with FS being hdg1 (/dev/hdg1)problem:No matter how I edit my /etc/fstab I can only write to my second empty disk as a root.As a user I can access it just to read, nothing else.I tried reformatting, mounting in different dirs, even under /home .I tried putting (user) in fstab, (user,rw) but no success.I can't see where the problem is, so please help out.I want to be able to fill this disk with my stuff and music and share it on network with my other comps.Guys/gals I am blind, tell me my path :)Thanks!

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nlinecomputers

I don't think you have finished the job.You have to mount the drive with the mount command and then you have to give the directory you create as a mount point the proper premissions to allow users access to the directory.Do you know how to use the mount command and the chmod command?What, if anything, have you done?

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Thanks for response nline.As I said before, I am no Linux expert (it's obvious) so I assumed that just putting the right stuff into your /etc/fstab should give you result.I guess I was wrong.I have had no clue that one have to chmod folder (mount point) in order to enable access to user??I'll give it a shot later and let you know if I succeeded.Thanks again for response B)

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Guest LilBambi

zox --If you do what nlinecomputers said, all should be happy.All rights to do anything (read, write, execute) within given directories, mount points, files, etc. are set by assigning rights to users/groups.

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Bingo!I got it.It is just that I had to unmount drive first, then chmod it, and then mount it and everything was fine.Such a simple thing but in three Linux books I am reading I couldn't find this little annoyance.I am trying to find now when I know what to look for in troubleshooting sections and such but no such thing.I guess because of such a small things that are not written, Linux gets bed name sometimes.bah, anyway, thanks for you generous help both nline and LilBambi, I appreciate it.Step at the time, but I am pretty sure XP is going to be my last Micro$haft system.:)P.S.So much for Suse documentation and their disk partition tool.Such a simple thing shouldn't have been missed by them, B)

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nlinecomputers

Well I can't say much about the SuSE docs as I never read them. BUT.....Lets be fair here. Linux treats disk and directories totally different then Windows does. EVERYTHING in Linux/unix is one directory. Everything mounts from a single "/" called root. Mount and Chmod have nothing to do with drives. They have to with directories. Unless your reading a book that is written for someone coming from a Windows background it is understandable that they don't explain that step to you. You can mount any directory to (almost) any other directory and file permissions are a function of directories not drives. How to mount a drive has nothing to do with how to grant file access in a directory.OTOH better books give better explainations. I find Running Linux to be a good book and the Rute's User's Tutorial And Exposition is another good book.

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Hi zox,Glad you´ve got your problem solved, I´m sorry I did miss all the fun, ( have to get a little sleep at night :D ) The Rute bible is the best resource you can get, read a few chapters every day and knowledge will come, even if you don´t understand the first time what the guy is writing about :D . ( and keep visiting the forum . . . . . :D ) :lol: Bruno

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Thanks for advice, I will read that one for sure as many others :)It crossed my mind to change permissions but remember, I am coming from Windows side, and I was afraid I might damage something since in my eyes that was not regular folder any more, but Disk filesystem mounted in int :D Now I know :lol: It's different world definitely.Thanks again!

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Zox:We have all been coming from windows, we have all been NEW, we know how you feel buddy, don´t worry about it ! ;) B) Bruno

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