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good piece which echos my thoughts on internet-of-everything


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V.T. Eric Layton

I don't even leave vampire electronics powered up in my home. It'll be a long, cold day in H3LL (probably not in my lifetime) before my house becomes the Internet connected nightmare described in this article. I like being a Luddite. I even have a stupid phone. There's no computer controlling my truck. There are days when I seriously consider canceling my Internet service and getting rid of these boxes sitting on my desk in here and out in my shop. :yes:

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ebrke

I don't even leave vampire electronics powered up in my home. house becomes the Internet connected nightmare described in this article. I like being a Luddite . . .

It's not being a Luddite, it's that I can't stand the implied loss of control. I don't want my house to "learn" when I want the temperature changed, like some of the thermostats I've seen recently, I want to decide myself, and tell the thermostat. Sure, I program the thermostat, but I do it myself and not infrequently change it manually for various reasons. I HATE the idea of a "connected" house "learning" my habits because it's "connected" and there's all sorts of privacy issues and because I'm in charge, not the darned house.

Edited by ebrke
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abarbarian
They’re rustic, and don’t even have high energy automobile docks. But the idea of getting off the grid really appeals to me, even if it’s just a fantasy.

 

Ha ha I always thought my life was like living a fantasy but it seems it is true. :fish:

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V.T. Eric Layton

A man's (or woman's) home is his (or her) castle, not some data snarfing operation for some "do no evil" mega corporation that wants to make GIGABILLIONS of $$$ off you and your habits and then use that money to become rulers of the galaxy (think of that Death Star thing in Star Wars). ;)

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V.T. Eric Layton

Hmm... you posted "crap." I've been typing "carp" for years here because I could have sword that crap was a banned word. You learn new carp every day. ;)

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Idiotic crap carp!

[...]

Hmm... you posted "crap." I've been typing "carp" for years here because I could have sword that crap was a banned word. You learn new carp every day. ;)

That was my 1st reaction too! crap is now accepted, though D*** is still not.

and evidently one can't swear in the past tense either :whistling:

Edited by crp
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Guest LilBambi

Crap never was a curse word. It means of very poor quality OR excrement. I only fixed it to be funny. ;)

 

As far as curse words go, it might be considered about as much a curse word as darn, or h3ll.

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ebrke

Well, in the true sense of the word, what that machine's selling is crap. As far as the vendors "swaying" me is concerned, I'm here to say it would "sway" me right on by to be presented with ads at the machine. I'm glad I'm as old as I am--I'm definitely not ready for this brave new world that's acomin'.

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abarbarian
I'm glad I'm as old as I am--I'm definitely not ready for this brave new world that's acomin'.

 

Me too. :breakfast:

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Capt.Crow

" Brave New World " It's blinkin well here already. 10$ java. 100$ tank fill. Humungous taxes. Homeless families on every corner.Leaky Nuclear plants. I'm not dead yet. Polluted tap water. The list is eeeeeennnnnnnnnnndddddddddlllllleeeeeeeeessssssssss.

 

 

 

Better Times Are Coming :w00tx100: :th_run-around-smiley: :Laughing: :blissysmile: :hysterical: :hysterical: :hysterical: :alien: :cat:

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V.T. Eric Layton

You're such an optimist, Cap'n. ;)

 

Have the rats been leaping out of the scuppers yet? Should I check the hold?

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abarbarian

10$ java??? java is free. buggy and far,far,far,far from its roots but still free.

 

java=coffee. Really you old timers need to get with it. :hysterical:

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Capt.Crow

You're such an optimist, Cap'n. ;)

 

Have the rats been leaping out of the scuppers yet? Should I check the hold?

 

The Rum bottle broke and they are leaving with big hangovers .Burnt paws . and the ships cat is laughing her head off. She is off watch for the foreseeable o:) future

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ross549

 

It's not being a Luddite, it's that I can't stand the implied loss of control. I don't want my house to "learn" when I want the temperature changed, like some of the thermostats I've seen recently, I want to decide myself, and tell the thermostat. Sure, I program the thermostat, but I do it myself and not infrequently change it manually for various reasons. I HATE the idea of a "connected" house "learning" my habits because it's "connected" and there's all sorts of privacy issues and because I'm in charge, not the darned house.

 

This is a huge concern with these types of products. When the Nest thermostat came out, it was not known to be "phoning home" as it is known to do now. Perhaps that was added with the recent software update.

 

In any case it was originally designed to monitor the activity in the house and optimize the heating/cooling to match the activity. Naturally, it could be overridden. The reason this was a novel idea is that many do not know how to properly program their programmable thermostat, and as such, waste a lot of energy heating/cooling the house when it was not necessary.

 

The thermostat was supposed to use local weather data from the internet and its activity sensors to learn the patterns in the house, and then use that information to optimize the heating/cooling schedule. The schedule is also editable.

 

I am in no way advocating for the collection of data gleaned from the thermostats. It was not known at the beginning that this collection was taking place, and that is unfortunate. The thermostat was supposed to be connected only enough to accomplish its tasks.

 

Adam

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Capt.Crow

There is an anti burglar system called " phone watch."

 

That's one reason I dumped the land line

 

I'm not keen on outsider I don't know . Looking in on my activities. Might be OK for superstars . But not for lidl-ol-me.

 

Nuttin wurt steelyn aniway

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ross549
The site further explains, "our attack on the Nest thermostat is simple, we use the device's recovery mode to run our own modified boot-loader (stage one and two). We then use our loaded boot-loaders to initiate a Linux kernel that is used to modify the file system on the Nest. We then add a SSH server running as root as well as functionality to create a reverse SSH tunnel to a specified host using the Nest's virtual drive".

 

Note that this hack requires physical access to the Nest itself. This is not something that could be done over the internet.

 

Adam

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Guest LilBambi

This is a huge concern with these types of products. When the Nest thermostat came out, it was not known to be "phoning home" as it is known to do now. Perhaps that was added with the recent software update.

 

In any case it was originally designed to monitor the activity in the house and optimize the heating/cooling to match the activity. Naturally, it could be overridden. The reason this was a novel idea is that many do not know how to properly program their programmable thermostat, and as such, waste a lot of energy heating/cooling the house when it was not necessary.

 

The thermostat was supposed to use local weather data from the internet and its activity sensors to learn the patterns in the house, and then use that information to optimize the heating/cooling schedule. The schedule is also editable.

 

I am in no way advocating for the collection of data gleaned from the thermostats. It was not known at the beginning that this collection was taking place, and that is unfortunate. The thermostat was supposed to be connected only enough to accomplish its tasks.

 

Adam

 

Yep, it wasn't known that TiVo was watching your clicks, habits, etc. when it first came out too. And of course, once it came out, many who had it had put good money out and didn't want to lose the value. So they said they didn't care about that.

 

I like this quote from crp's posted betanews article (actually the whole article, but this one in particular):

 

I am not scared of the technology, but of the hackers. You see, anything connected to the internet has the capability of being hacked or exploited. This makes me hesitant to embrace the connected home. Think I'm crazy? Think again. Today, popular Google TV hacking site GTV Hacker, announces it has hacked the device to enable the booting of unsigned code. If you own a Nest, hackers could have a backdoor into your home.

 

Any product that can spy on you in one way or another, can also be hacked and abused by criminal hackers or government entities.

Edited by LilBambi
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ross549

As I posted above, this hack is not one that could be exploited from the internet, but when you have physical access to the device. It also requires you to put it into DFU (Device Firmware Update) mode.

 

Adam

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