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XP Home Edition with No Admin Password?


Robert

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Every XP Home computer I have checked (other than an eMachine with Safe Mode disabled) has no password on the Administrators account.I assume this is because it is only the rare user that has ever gone into Safe Mode in the first place.Several of the computers in question had some pretty extensive security measures installed by parents to keep the kids out of where they don't belong. Of course the kids, had they known this, could have pressed F8, gotten into the Administrator account, created one for themselves, and done all sorts of mischief without their parents knowledge.This also opens the door to housekeepers, neighbors, and anyone with physical access to the computer to gain full access.A search of Windows Help Files as well as several security books revealed nothing about this. I believe most users are clueless their data is so vulnerable to prying eyes.The worst part is thinking you had a good security setup only to be left so vulnerable.Anyone else run into this?Robert

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hi, robert!having never seen xp home, no. :( but a great rule of thumb for any system you want secure is physical security. :( several ligitimate companies sell driver disks that, when a workstation or server is booted will allow you to change the admin password.another major ms product installs itself with the admin password blank (it's the administrator account, but it's not called that...) and does not offer an opportunity during install to set a pw for it!unix falls on the side of tighter security, ms, looser (holier, swiss cheesier, etc.) :(

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Hi Robert,Yes, every Compaq and HP system with WinXP Home Edition that I've come across had the same shortcoming. And what you (and the other member) wrote is true.However, both Compaq and HP make this known in their manuals. So, computer savvy and security concious users can address this if they take the time to read the User Guide.Also, the typical user who purchases a WinXP home system and keeps that OS is probably a recent graduate of Win98SE/WinME which had no security. They are more likely looking for an easy feature rich OS first, and security as a distant second.This doesn't make the points raised less important but it does put the issue in perspective when you consider the typical audience for XP Home.

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Too bad eMachine did not put anything about this in the user manual.I never had access to the user manuals of the other computers so I never knew they covered it.I spend so much time in Windows 2000 that XP's issues drive me up the wall when I have to deal with them. I find it so much easier to keep W2K secure yet accessible on the network.Thanks for the replies,Robert

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