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Kernel Panic after Mandy install


ichase
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I obviously did something wrong but I can't seem to figure out what. I installed Mandriva 2010.1 on the 3rd open partition on the internal HDD of my Compaq Presario Lappy. I first attempted to use the "Use existing partitions" option because it made the most sense. I then get the screen "Change the mount points"

SDA 6 (25GB, /, Ext4) <---This is where I have UE 2.8 installedSDA 7 (25GB, Ext4) <------Where I want to install Mandy to

If I chose to mount SDA 7 as "/" I get an error stating "There is already a partition with mount point /" So not knowing what to choose because I was thinking that I would be setting SDA 7 also to root for this distro; I selected cancel.I then chose the "Custom Partition" option. Selected SDA 7 formated Ext4, and then it started installing. I chose Bootloader "Grub w/ text menu" and Boot Device as DEV/SDA7 (Pretty sure this is where I screwed up) options were DEV/SDA, DEV/SDA5, DEV/SDA6, and DEV/SDA7 Once the install was complete I was prompted to hit finished and the media was ejected and it got to the point where it said "Halting" and it froze. So I rebooted. Saw my Grub menu with UE 2.8 and XP. Booted UE 2.8 went to console and typed:

 Sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg

No problems there. I then typed:

 Sudo grub-install /dev/sda

No problems there.I then reboot and see my Mandriva 2010.0 on SDA7 as a boot option in my menu. I select and then I get

Kernel Panic -Not syncing : VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unknown-block (0,0)
UE 2.8 and XP continue to boot just fine.And who said no one asks for help on this site anymore :hysterical:Thanks again,Ian Edited by ichase
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securitybreach

That is a fairly common error and basically means that the mount points are not pointing to the correct partition. I would suggest a reinstallation.

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The "halting and froze" bit sounds like the problem.Can you boot it with SuperGrubDisk (or SuperGrub2Disk)? If so you can probably fix your Mandy Grub from inside Mandy and install it to /dev/sda7. Actually I think Josh is right and my second suggestion is more likely. Trying SuperGrub2Disk can't hurt though.Also the kernel panic message could indicate that the / partition is not where it should be, in which case a reinstall and double-check that sda7 is indeed selected for /.Lotsa luck! :)

Edited by sunrat
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Try looking at Look at (hdx,y) in your /boot/grub/grub.cfg If I'm not mistaken GRUB counts partitions starting from (hdx,0) and GRUB2 starts from (hdx,1). so you'd be off one in grub2.

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No fix, but that's what happens if I try to boot either of my PCLinuxOS installs with GRUB 2 from any other OS using GRUB 2.That is if I run the config command like you did, the PCLinuxOS installs show up but boot to the same unhelpful kernel panic message you get.Since PCLinuxOS is based on Mandy might there not be a common problem here?Below is a snippet of my PCLinuxOS grub.conf entry.menuentry "2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs (on /dev/sda7)" { insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,7)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set c6f7c53b-62a0-4e42-b8c2-65fe3d80e6ec linux /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs BOOT_IMAGE=2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs root=UUID=c6f7c53b-62a0-4e42-b8c2-65fe3d80e6ec resume=UUID=17dce95a-3e0a-4a41-a41d-ff2dfbe373a6 splash=silent vga=788 initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd-2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs.img}The entry in red should be (hd0,7) the same as the entry in blue.Two things here, I have no clue how to fix that erroneous entry, grub.conf is not supposed to be editable.second since I reverted to grub legacy on all my GRUB 2 distros I have no desire to find out.The below info may be of help.http://members.iinet.net/~herman546/p20.html

Edited by Frank Golden
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Frankdo you install GRUB 2 to PCLinuxOS? I thought default on PCLinuxOS was GRUB1
PCLinuxOS 2010 is legacy grub the, snippet I posted is from the grub menu produced when Ultimate Edition is configuredto scan and create entries for all OS's available like during install or later from the command line.It creates a menu with the errors shown in my previous post.I suspect that Ian has Ultimate Edition as the host for his grub.Actually after re-reading his original post that is exactly the case.Thus the error.I tested this (in my setup) with the SuperGrub CD 1.30I booted to the CD and selected "any GRUB 2 installation (even if mbr is overwritten)"press EnterSelect the line corresponding to the host GRUB.In my case it was my Ultimate entry. press Enter.Scroll down to the (in my case PCLinuxOS entry and press e.This will show the info hidden in the entry.If there is a difference between the two entries like in the snippet I posted before thenchanging the "initrd (hd0,x) value to the correct value should allow PCLinuxOS (in this example) to boot normally.It did for me.NOTE: this is only a temporary change.PCLinuxOS uses that separate "initrd" line like I suspect Mandy does.Why GRUB 2 can't get this right I don't know.If the issue was present in legacy grub the real easy fix would be to edit /boot/grub/menu.lst manually.You can't do that with GRUB 2.I don't have GRUB 2 installed on any OS (I've reverted to legacy GRUB on any affected distro installs).I had to restore an earlier image of Ultimate (before I reverted to legacy) to test this.As soon as I'm done here I'm going to restore the latest image to get back to my legacy grub in Ultimate.I detest GRUB 2 and feel it is a step backwards (IMHO) and will be dragged kicking and screaming into using it. :hysterical:I'm D\L ing Mandy 2010.2 right now and will see if I can repeat the error. Edited by Frank Golden
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The "halting and froze" bit sounds like the problem.
I found that also to be of concern considering it did this on both install attempts.
Can you boot it with SuperGrubDisk (or SuperGrub2Disk)? If so you can probably fix your Mandy Grub from inside Mandy and install it to /dev/sda7. Actually I think Josh is right and my second suggestion is more likely. Trying SuperGrub2Disk can't hurt though.
Looks like I may need to download SuperGrubDisk
Also the kernel panic message could indicate that the / partition is not where it should be, in which case a reinstall and double-check that sda7 is indeed selected for /.Lotsa luck! :)
Mentioned in my OP that when I selected install using existing partitions, it would not allow me to set SDA7 to / because SDA6 was already set to / Did I choose the correct path in using the Custom Partition method? I never had the oportunity to set SDA7 as root. Once the formating to Ext4 was complete, it started installing. I verified via GParted in UE 2.8 that in fact Mandy 2010.1 was installed on SDA7 but can not confirm it was set to root.Now my next question is, how do you know what Grub each distro is using? Honestly being new at this, I would not know Legacy Grub from Grub 2 to look at it?? :) Also, (wanting to make sure I am reading Frank's reply corectly) will the SuperGrubDisk allow me to edit the grub.cfg file? This would be nice due to the fact that like Frank mentioned in another thread, my grub boot menu is quite unorganized. I have UE 2.8 with 2 different kernal editions, a safe mode option, 2 memtest options and the XP. Would like it too look like yours Frank where it only has the OS's to choose from. This will most definitely come in handy once I start installing distros to the external. :thumbsup:Thanks,Ian
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I found that also to be of concern considering it did this on both install attempts.Looks like I may need to download SuperGrubDiskMentioned in my OP that when I selected install using existing partitions, it would not allow me to set SDA7 to / because SDA6 was already set to / Did I choose the correct path in using the Custom Partition method? I never had the oportunity to set SDA7 as root. Once the formating to Ext4 was complete, it started installing. I verified via GParted in UE 2.8 that in fact Mandy 2010.1 was installed on SDA7 but can not confirm it was set to root.Now my next question is, how do you know what Grub each distro is using? Honestly being new at this, I would not know Legacy Grub from Grub 2 to look at it?? :) Also, (wanting to make sure I am reading Frank's reply corectly) will the SuperGrubDisk allow me to edit the grub.cfg file? This would be nice due to the fact that like Frank mentioned in another thread, my grub boot menu is quite unorganized. I have UE 2.8 with 2 different kernal editions, a safe mode option, 2 memtest options and the XP. Would like it too look like yours Frank where it only has the OS's to choose from. This will most definitely come in handy once I start installing distros to the external. :thumbsup:Thanks,Ian
Ok first things first the Super GRUB Disk does not permanently edit the menu.It only allows temporary changes.Now going back to your initial post.I duplicated your issue by installing Mandy 2010.1 on a spare partition of my internal drive.I then booted Ultimate Edition 2.8 (it's the only install that still has GRUB 2).I ran the command
sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg

Just like you did and then

sudo grub-install /dev/sda

Again just like you did.The first command forces Ultimate Edition 2.8 to scan your drive for OS installs and create a new grub.conf filewith all your OS's including your Mandy install.The second one installs GRUB to the mbr of sda.When booting my machine there is an entry for Mandy just like you.Selecting that entry and typing

e

to edit.Shows the discrepancy that I posted earlier.menuentry "linux (on /dev/sda8)" { insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,msdos8)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf linux /boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=linux root=UUID=f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf resume=UUID=17dce95a-3e0a-4a41-a41d-ff2dfbe373a6 splash=silent vga=788 initrd (hd0,7)/boot/initrd.imgAs you can see the blue entry shows (hd0,msdos8) while the text in red is (hd0,7).The red text needs to be (hd0,8).If while in the edit mode you change that text to (hd0,8) like it's supposed to be and type ctrl+x it should boot Mandy normally.This is not permanent change but it will confirm the source of the error.There has to be a way to correct this but I don't know how.It's easy with legacy grub you just open /boot/grub/menu.lst in a text editor and make the change.As I said before I have reverted to legacy grub as my bootloader so I can easily fix issues like this.Let my do some more research.

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367313112166365.jpg Which one should I use? SuperGrub2 Disk says it does not fix Grub or Grub2, SuperGrub Disk says it fixes Grub but not Grub 2 and neither one can regenerate grub menus? Just want to make sure I use the right one. Rescatux seems to do it all in Debian and Ubuntu systems.I will try your guidance tonight Frank. Thank you for taking the time to research this for me. :)Ian Edited by ichase
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367313112166365.jpg Which one should I use? SuperGrub2 Disk says it does not fix Grub or Grub2, SuperGrub Disk says it fixes Grub but not Grub 2 and neither one can regenerate grub menus? Just want to make sure I use the right one. Rescatux seems to do it all in Debian and Ubuntu systems.I will try your guidance tonight Frank. Thank you for taking the time to research this for me. :)Ian
If you were using legacy grub in Ultimate Edition then the lines to add to your /boot/grub/menu.lst that should boot Mandy would be
title		   Mandrivakernel		(hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=linux root=/dev/sda7  resume=/dev/sdax splash=verbose vga=788initrd		  (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.img

the "x" in resume=/dev/sdax would be your swap partition.The above is based on the entry in my /boot/grub/menu.lst in my Mandy install.It is modified for the setup you have.It is easy to revert grub2 to legacy but I wouldn't do that with your level of experience with linux.

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If you were using legacy grub in Ultimate Edition then the lines to add to your /boot/grub/menu.lst that should boot Mandy would be
First off thanks Frank for the guidance. But AM I using legacy grub in UE or is it Grub2? If it's Grub2 then would your guidance work? Like mentioned before, I would not be able to look at a computer when booting and tell you "Hey that is Legacy Grub, or Grub 2 or Lilo" How do I know what Grub each distro is using?If installing multiple distros both using Grub2 am I to assume that this kernel panic will be an ongoing issue until the developers fix it?You right about switching from 2 to legacy. Heck, if I don't even know how to tell the 2 appart, I am Definitelynot ready to tackle switching from one to another. :)
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First off thanks Frank for the guidance. But AM I using legacy grub in UE or is it Grub2? If it's Grub2 then would your guidance work? Like mentioned before, I would not be able to look at a computer when booting and tell you "Hey that is Legacy Grub, or Grub 2 or Lilo" How do I know what Grub each distro is using?If installing multiple distros both using Grub2 am I to assume that this kernel panic will be an ongoing issue until the developers fix it?You right about switching from 2 to legacy. Heck, if I don't even know how to tell the 2 appart, I am Definitelynot ready to tackle switching from one to another. :)
Ubuntu from 9.10 on (including Mint and Ultimate) use GRUB2 *sigh* so no you can't use the menu entry I provided.The mandy you installed uses legacy grub.If you run the command gksudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst in Mandy you will see the contents of the menu.lst file used by legacy grub.If a distro uses GRUB 2 then that command will complain that no such file exists.On a distro using GRUB 2 the /boot/grub/menu.lst file is replaced by a /boot/grub/grub.conf file.This issue appears to be related to Mandy and it's sibling PCLinuxOS, both of which use the initrd line that contains the wrong entry.Ubuntu doesn't have this issue.I just tried manually editing the grub.conf file in my Ultimate.The conventional wisdom is that file shouldn't be manually edited so I don't know how that will go.Will report back in a few minutes.I'm BACKOK that worked.In Ultimate run the command
gksudo gedit /boot/grub/grub.cfg

This will open up the grub.conf file for editing.There are warnings about not editing this file, ignore them.locate the Mandy entries, they will look something like this.

menuentry "linux (on /dev/sda7)" { insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,msdos7)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf linux /boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=linux root=UUID=f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf resume=UUID=17dce95a-3e0a-4a41-a41d-ff2dfbe373a6 splash=silent vga=788 initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.img}menuentry "linux-nonfb (on /dev/sda7)" { insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,msdos7)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf linux /boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=linux-nonfb root=UUID=f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf resume=UUID=17dce95a-3e0a-4a41-a41d-ff2dfbe373a6 initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.img}menuentry "failsafe (on /dev/sda7)" { insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,msdos7)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf linux /boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=failsafe root=UUID=f35b3b6e-5afd-4cdf-a453-4022690fecaf failsafe initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.img}
Change every instance of initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.imgto initrd (hd0,7)/boot/intrd.imgactually you only need to change the (hd0,6) to (hd0,7).save changes using the save icon in gedit and exit.Reboot and you should be able to boot mandy.This is really not a fix but a workaround because everytime you upgrade a kernel or upgrade GRUB2 in Ultimateit will "restore" the error.You would then need to manually edit the grub.conf file again using the command above.It might be a good idea to save the command as a textfile in Ultimate or simply create a launcher for it for future use.To create launcher right click an empty area of the desktop and choose "Create Launcher".In the resulting dialog enter a name in the name field FixGRub might be appropriate.In the command field use
gksudo gedit /boot/grub/grub.cfg

Click OK and you now have a shortcut to edit your grub.conf file.When you click it it will prompt for your password and then open the .conf file for editing.Remember that every time Synaptic, in Ultimate updates GRUB 2 or does a kernel update you will need to edit the grub.conf file again.If you install distros on your external drive choose to install grub on the partition you installed the distro to and then boot Ultimate and run

sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg

This will update GRUB 2 to include the new distros but you will then need to use your new launcher to re edit the .grub.conf file.If the new distro uses a initrd (hd0,x) etc. like Mandy or PCLinuxOS then make the needed changes to them as well while you are editing the file.If you don't the new distros will kernel panic too.Ubuntu and Ubuntu based distros are seemingly "immune" from this bulls*it issue.At least in my experience.GRUB 2 should not be so difficult to confgure.I've looked for ways to correct errors like this on the net but can't find any.This is the only way I can see to "fix" this issue.Did I mention that I hate GRUB 2.

Edited by Frank Golden
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Did I mention that I hate GRUB 2.
Actually Frank, I would have never known that you had any issue with Grub2 before that comment. :hysterical:Great guidance, and very easy to understand. Between this and the wireless issue in UE (which is now fixed once I actually "LOADED" the driver via modprobe b43) I have learned quite a bit. To me this is what it is all about. Learn, Learn, and more Learn.You have all been great teachers!!!!!! Bruno is no doubt very proud of you all. :)All the best Frank. I wish you and yours a safe and Merry Christmas and a wonderful 2011.Ian
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Good work Frank! :) So it is correct of being one off(and that was about my total knowledge of Grub2)...Yeah, not a big fan of Grub 2 either...for me it's just being used to GRUB...and to lazy to learn Grub2.

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This is a link to the Grub Manual that was with-in the link Frank posted earlier. I printed this 98 page .pdf document out and have been reading for a little while now. If you do not have a understanding of how Grub works, this manual will definitely educate you very well.Thanks for posting the original link Frank. :)Ian

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securitybreach

Great job Frank :thumbsup:I am glad someone knows about grub, I just set it up and forget about it. I am pretty good at troubleshooting it but not much an expert on it. I did previously install Grub 2 on Archlinux and had a really cool looking splash, but when I reinstalled I figured why bother when I only see it for less than a second. Oh well thanks Frank!

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You were correct Frank, the grub.cnf file had the initrd set to HD0, 5 which is my Extended Partition. Strange?? Either way, I followed your guidance as well as created a launcher. So, should be good to go.Thanks again for your great guidance. :)Ian

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Maybe try going in to UE and run
update-grub

A concise guide on Grub2 at Dodoimedo

Thanks for the link sunrat, I have everything working well right now so I am a little timmid of updating the grub. I am a true believer of
If it ain't broke.....Don't fix it
:hysterical:All the best,Ian Edited by ichase
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Thanks for the link sunrat, I have everything working well right now so I am a little timmid of updating the grub. I am a true believer of :hysterical:All the best,Ian
If you update grub now it will recreate the error.Besides you need the command to be
sudo update-grub

Use this command if you corrected the error using conventional GRUB2 methods.We bypassed those methods because I couldn't find a GRUB2 way to fix the errors permanently.If the grub.conf file gets messed up again use the edit shortcut to "fix" it.I must repeat we implemented a workaround not a fix.If my experience with PCLinuxOS and now Mandy is any indication GRUB 2 will create this error situation wheneverit encounters a situation where the partition is specified for the initrd.img file.I think I'll look into a bug report for this issue.

Edited by Frank Golden
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In theory, because I would like to clean up my grub menu at start up could I just delete these entries from the grub.cfg file so that they no longer show up in the menu?

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_memtest86+ ###menuentry "Memory test (memtest86+)" {	insmod part_msdos	insmod ext2	set root='(hd0,msdos6)'	search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set 490fb7ce-042e-4fc1-9152-7c2ace583e59	linux16	/boot/memtest86+.bin}menuentry "Memory test (memtest86+, serial console 115200)" {	insmod part_msdos	insmod ext2	set root='(hd0,msdos6)'	search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set 490fb7ce-042e-4fc1-9152-7c2ace583e59	linux16	/boot/memtest86+.bin console=ttyS0,115200n8}### END /etc/grub.d/20_memtest86+ ###

Ian

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In theory, because I would like to clean up my grub menu at start up could I just delete these entries from the grub.cfg file so that they no longer show up in the menu?
### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_memtest86+ ###menuentry "Memory test (memtest86+)" {	insmod part_msdos	insmod ext2	set root='(hd0,msdos6)'	search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set 490fb7ce-042e-4fc1-9152-7c2ace583e59	linux16	/boot/memtest86+.bin}menuentry "Memory test (memtest86+, serial console 115200)" {	insmod part_msdos	insmod ext2	set root='(hd0,msdos6)'	search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set 490fb7ce-042e-4fc1-9152-7c2ace583e59	linux16	/boot/memtest86+.bin console=ttyS0,115200n8}### END /etc/grub.d/20_memtest86+ ###

Ian

You could but the GRUB2 tutorials supposedly outlines a way to remove these entries the GRUB2 way.Directly editing the grub.conf file like we did is a workaround and I guess could cause damage.From the Deodoimedo tutorial posted by Sunrat
GRUB 2 works like this:/etc/default/grub contains customization; /etc/grub.d/ scripts contain GRUB menu information and operating system boot scripts. When the update-grub command is run, it reads the contents of the grub file and the grub.d scripts and creates the grub.cfg file.That's all.To change the grub.cfg file, you need to edit the grub file or the scripts under grub.d.
To change the grub.cfg file, you need to edit the grub file or the scripts under grub.d. I've avoided this entire situation by simply reverting to legacy grub in my host grub distro (Lucid).My advice is to read as much as you can about GRUB2 to see if you can make sense of it.I don't want anything to do with it.If there is any need for a GUI tool to do this this is it. Edited by Frank Golden
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I have everything working well right now so I am a little timid of updating the grub.
Cool everything's working now. :( (makes it easier to break :D :unsure: :D )
If you update grub now it will recreate the error.Besides you need the command to be
sudo update-grub

Use this command if you corrected the error using conventional GRUB2 methods.

Sorry I was a little terse in explanation. I was rushing through a cup of peppermint tea before going RC heli flying for the day. ;) :D You do need to make a custom script first, read the link and it's all explained there. And you can tell I'm not a Ubuntoozie! I forget about sudo, su to root for me. <slaps self over back of head>There's also good advice on booting Grub legacy from Grub2, and vice-versa.Another wealth of info on Grub2 is at Ubuntu Wiki.<sneaks back to fridge for more Xmas beer> :wacko: Edited by sunrat
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Well I submitted a bug report to the GRUBBY developers and got this email back.i

nitrd line is taken from linux-boot-prober which already removes (..) fromkernel line but doesn't do the same for initrd line. So I suggest contactingdebian-boot folks who maintain linux-boot-prober.
Talk about passing the buck!
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securitybreach
Well I submitted a bug report to the GRUBBY developers and got this email back.iTalk about passing the buck!
Wow, they could at least pass it along to the devs since more than likely they keep contact with some of the debian devs or maybe not. Who knows?
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Oh I dunno... you did get a reply on Christmas Day B)
Well I sent an email to the person that invalidated my bug report and this is the reply.
On 12/24/2010 04:21 PM, Frank Golden wrote:Thanks for passing the buck. This issue is affecting GRUB2's ability to correctly create a boot menu. As such I would have thought it would have garnered more interest with the GRUB project. Maybe even spuring them to contact the supporters of the program they are using to implement GRUB2 functionality. GRUB2 is broken because of this issue. Folks multibootin with GRUB2 deserve a product that doesn't produce errors that prevent an installed OS from booting. BTW,How about a link to the bug reporting site for debian-boot if you aren't going to take the time to contact them. It is ultimately your issue if you choose to implement a buggy tool in your product. And yes I am aware that this is free software but stuff like this is what turns folks off to Linux.This is just the effort separation. Bitching around won't help you. _______________________________________________ Message sent via/by Savannah http://savannah.gnu.org/--RegardsVladimir 'φ-coder/phcoder' Serbinenko
The text in red is Vladimir's reply.And no not on Christmas day. Edited by Frank Golden
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securitybreach
Well I sent an email to the person that invalidated my bug report and this is the reply.The text in red is Vladimir's reply.And no not on Christmas day.
All I can say is wow!!! B)
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I was just browsing at http://www.webservertalk.com/archive99-2010-12-2343588.htmlOne poster suggested that it's not necessary to specify the partition on the initrd line, because it's already specified on the set root line. I haven't tested this, but it's worth a try.Also it appears that Debian runs os-prober and generates a grub.cfg file when running update-grub. I thought this was the case (just from watching the text messages when I install a new kernel), can anyone confirm?

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