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Arch vs. Slackware, a Friendly Comparison


V.T. Eric Layton
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Great article, but which one do I choose ;) it didn't tell me :) On a side note, to be fair...Any user friendly Linux distro still uses the same engine parts,with all the same stuff under the hood, though sometimes moved around.You can get your hands just as dirty, and re-compile or replace an Unbuntu kernel just as easy as an Arch or Slackware one."though sometimes moved around" is an important point, I know w/ Slackware, I'll see thefiles I expect to see and better yet, they will be where I expect to see them.Friendly distros are notorious for moving and changing things.It's not always the distro that makes the mechanic, but some distros do requirea certain level of familiarity with the system. :w00t:

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V.T. Eric Layton

That's correct. Every GNU/Linux distribution out there only differs by minor things... package management, windows management, desktop environments, etc. When comparing say Ubuntu to Slackware to LFS, we can use an automotive analogy.Ubuntu Linux Car206.jpgIt's very modern and polished. Unfortunately, it's not really meant for backyard mechanics to be tinkering with. Unless you know your stuff, you shouldn't be looking under the hood too much.Slackware Linux CarMyHeavyChevy78.jpgA backyard mechanic's dream project. You can tear it down and rebuild it right there in the backyard. No $100,000 analyzers needed to tune it up. Working on it is actually a learning experience.Linux From Scratch Car0607kc_01_z%20race_car_replicars_shop%20.jpgYou actually have to build this one from the ground up. It's a real learning experience. ;)

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securitybreach

Awesome article Eric, thanks ;) Gonna link in the tutorial for the nice explanation of Archlinux. Also, a really great analogy!!!!Regexorcist, I could not of said it better myself!!! I have had to explain this a dozen times to new penguins I converted, Telling them that any distro can be made to look like any other and they are all basically the same under the hood.

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V.T. Eric Layton

Actually, yes.... that's my own 19 and 57 Chevrolet Belair 2d HT. I wish I still had that ol' girl. She had diamond pleat white leather interior, with a 1970 Z28 LT1 Hi-perf 350 CU engine and Muncie M22 "rock crusher" 4 spd on the floor. That 3750 lb heavy sled could turn 12.8 second 1/4 miles with a stock 350 ratio highway rear differential.

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Need some clarification. The article stated: "One major difference is that Arch uses a package dependency system, while Slack does not."I don't get how you can have a system built without dependencies? Generally, do not most programs "depend" on other programs to function? Does Slack have all the dependencies already included in the package, while Arch requires the extra steps of retrieving them separately?CheersPS:Eric: Thanks for the great link and comparisonIn terms of distros: It's amazing what one can do with the freedom to tinker, learn and modify.

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V.T. Eric Layton
Need some clarification. The article stated: "One major difference is that Arch uses a package dependency system, while Slack does not."
Quite true, Zeek. If you download a .tgz or the new .txz package from somewhere, there's no guarantee it will run on your Slackware system if you install it via the built-in package tool (installpkg, removepkg, etc.). The package tool does not search for nor warn about any dependencies. It just installs the app on your system assuming that YOU know what is required to make it run. However, there are other tools available for Slackware that do the dependency checks, e.g.; SwareT (obsoleted), Slapt-get, and the new Slackpkg (included in Slack 13).Even when installing from SlackBuild scripts, there is no dependency check. However, SlackBuild script creators almost always add a note about what is required to make the app work, so that makes life a bit easier.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slackware#Package_managementHope that answered your query. :thumbsup:
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V.T. Eric Layton
Whoa!! That sounds bad*** :thumbsup:
It was a fun car. I bought, customized, drove, and eventually sold this car to a buddy of mine down the block. That was from 1977 to 1983. I miss that car. I'm actually on the hunt for a '55 Chevy this time around. Waiting on lottery win first, though.1955 Chevy1955%20Chevy%20Bel%20Air%20PP%20(1).JPG105.gif
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securitybreach
Nice article. Now I really want to try Arch out!
Whenever your ready Sue :thumbsup: I will help out anyway I can. You should not having too many problems though after all you are part "Slacker" :thumbsup:
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Actually, yes.... that's my own 19 and 57 Chevrolet Belair 2d HT. I wish I still had that ol' girl. She had diamond pleat white leather interior, with a 1970 Z28 LT1 Hi-perf 350 CU engine and Muncie M22 "rock crusher" 4 spd on the floor. That 3750 lb heavy sled could turn 12.8 second 1/4 miles with a stock 350 ratio highway rear differential.
Ah... you're a motor-head, I'm jealous, that's a nice machine.
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Whenever your ready Sue B) I will help out anyway I can. You should not having too many problems though after all you are part "Slacker" :devil:
It's been so long since I had Slack up and running, I've forgotten most of what I learned. :( But yeah, I'm ready to give Arch a go. I've got the core CD burned. Now I just need some time to install it.
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securitybreach
It's been so long since I had Slack up and running, I've forgotten most of what I learned. :devil: But yeah, I'm ready to give Arch a go. I've got the core CD burned. Now I just need some time to install it.
Sounds good. Just use my tutorial http://forums.scotsnewsletter.com/index.php?showtopic=27596 and the Arch Beginners' Guide. Of course if you need any help I am mostly always here.
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Hey JoshQuestion:Is it possible to access your tutorial while also in the process of installing Arch (or any other tutorial for that matter)? What I have discovered so far.The Arch "Beginners' Guide" link that you provided says:"The official install guide is conveniently available right on the live system! To access it, change to vc/2 (virtual console #2) with <ALT>+F2, and then invoke /usr/bin/less by typing in the following at the [root] # prompt: # less /arch/docs/official_installation_guide_en"Great, I have access to the Beginner's Guide while installing, but how to also have access to YOUR guide? Unfortunately, printer is not an option, so:

  1. First, configure the network (following the instructions in the Beginner's Guide using vc/2)
  2. Switch to vc/3 (via Alt-F3)
  3. According to Gentoo (section 3.8), I could possible use links (or even elinks) via# links http://forums.scotsnewsletter.com/index.php?showtopic=27596
  4. Ok, but now how do I find out if the program called links is available to me during the installation process? Searched Arch's main site, forums, and wiki for awhile to see what programs are part of the core iso for the 32bit arch - but no luck. I guess, I could download the core iso, mount it, and have a look. But, I am sure that info is located somewhere, but where?
  5. If links is not part of the core iso, then I am out of luck???

Cheers PS: I noticed that you are constantly updating your tutorial - cool

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V.T. Eric Layton

Zeek and Sue,The way I did it was to copy/paste Josh's tutorial and the entire Arch Linux Beginners Guide into two separate text files. Store them somewhere on a partition on one of your hard drives or on a CD or even on a thumb drive. Once you start your Arch install, you'll have a multi-user interface available (command line only). You'll be using tty0 for the Arch install. However, you can switch to tty1 and tty2 using ALT-F2 or F3. You can mount the partition/CD/thumb where the text files are stored and then open (with vim or nano) Josh's in tty1 and the Beginners Guide in tty2. To refer to them as you install Arch, just ALT-F2 or F3 to see them and then ALT-F1 to get back to the installation.Easy-peasy! :)

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Easy-peasy! :)
Now it is, Thanks EricI saw that you were able to post on this forum awhile back using tty0/1, where you using links?Feel much better that I am able to access Josh's tutorial during the installation processCheers
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V.T. Eric Layton

Nah... I was running X in tty1 to post here. In tty0, I was in cli updating. Multi-user is COOL! Try that with MS Windows. :)

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V.T. Eric Layton

tty = controlling terminalIn multi-user mode in Linux, you have more than one terminal available for your use. The brief answer to your question --> http://linux.about.com/od/commands/l/blcmdl4_tty.htmThe really long and detailed answer --> http://www.linusakesson.net/programming/tty/index.phpYou can switch between terminals at the command line when you're in run level 3 (no X running) by holding the ALT key and pressing F2, F3, etc. Next time you boot up without X, try it. Login in initially, then ALT-F2. You'll be taken to the next tty where you'll see another login prompt. You can login there and work too. To return to the original tty0, just ALT-F1. Easy-peasy (if you don't read anything in that second link above :) )!

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I was going to go Sue's way!I have a 2nd machine running an old PCLinuxOS ( 500 mhZ and very little RAM ) but I can access Josh's link and the machine is next to mine so I can follow the tutorial and do the install at the same time.Eric's option is definitely worth looking into!!!I'll probably start installing Arch next week! Will keep you posted!

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Thanks! I actually do know how to do that, I just didn't know what it was called. :)

I was going to go Sue's way!I have a 2nd machine running an old PCLinuxOS ( 500 mhZ and very little RAM ) but I can access Josh's link and the machine is next to mine so I can follow the tutorial and do the install at the same time.Eric's option is definitely worth looking into!!!I'll probably start installing Arch next week! Will keep you posted!
Good luck Réjean! :)
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The really long and detailed answer --> http://www.linusakesson.net/programming/tty/index.php
That was an interesting article, though I agree, way more than Sue or anybody needs to know for purposes of reading about Arch Linux on a terminal. I hadn't thought of VT-100 in a while, or UART in quite a long time. (I used to be on one of the most venerable "online networks", Delphi, and I had to know what VT-100 emulation was for some troubleshooting. And I did put a modem into a 286 once and had to know something about UART settings.)But when Linus Akesson got to SIGTTIN and SIGWINCH, the old shoulder pumpkin, which tends to overheat under even moderate burdens of thought, got dangerously toasty. So I bookmarked it and will try again when I've recovered a bit.:)
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