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hkspike

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Two minor annoyances - of course, I might have missed a setting - the Back button on my mouse doesn't take me back to the previous page.Despite a minor tweak of the Default Search engine, Chrome gives me my search results in Chinese. Sure, I live in Hong Kong but maybe Google need to realise that the IP address alone does not define language. There is no obvious language switch button.The spell checker on this page does not recognise Google as a word!

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Two minor annoyances - of course, I might have missed a setting - the Back button on my mouse doesn't take me back to the previous page.!
The "Home" button on my Logitech keyboard doesn't do anything when I make Chrome the default browser. Even if I go into the keyboard software and change the Home key from its default task (open the home page) to open a web page, nothing happens. Switch back to IE as default, and the Home key works. Another annoyance is that when Chrome is running, the hard drive seems to be constantly running. I wonder if eventually Chrome will be blamed for premature failure of hard drives B)
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Wow I tried it and had no problem at all. It not only grabbed my bookmarks but the saved passwords I have for sites. I too, am a bit of a fan of google, I use their gmail and share documents with friends online through their googledocs. I do find chrome fast loading sites too.

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The "Home" button on my Logitech keyboard doesn't do anything when I make Chrome the default browser. Even if I go into the keyboard software and change the Home key from its default task (open the home page) to open a web page, nothing happens. Switch back to IE as default, and the Home key works.
That sounds more like a Logitech hardware/software problem. It's probably hardwired by default to start up IE by using a shortcut to the internet explorer folder. Try changing it to Firefox or Opera and see if the problem still persists - if the same problem occurs with Firefox, then it's a Logitech issue and has nothing to do with Chrome.I have to say that I'm really surprised to see Google jumping into the browser wars. After some 7-8 years after Firefox's entry into market, IE continues to hold a large marketshare. Depending on the stats you use, Firefox & Opera still has less than 20% share of the market. That just goes to show you how difficult it is to change people's browsing habits. And just like the comment I made about Slepnir browser a few weeks ago, being a late comer into the browser war is not in Google's favor. Especially when you consider all this controversy swirling around data privacy issue - people are going to be skittish about 'experimenting' with a new browser which may or may not be sending out private data. I know myself after reading all about these data privacy "issues" on Chrome, i am less enthused about trying out their browser than I was about a week ago. I don't care even if it's on my system even on a temporary basis - I don't care for any ambiguously worded EULA or some software that's going to send out data silently in the background.
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  • 3 weeks later...

google's success is based on sharing gathered data (and i don't mean results of its web spiders...)i loaded chrome.it is billed as fast and lots more space to display a web page.in a simple side-by-side comparison with ff (i have dual 19" lcd's...) i see precious little difference.turning off ff toolbars produces similarly sized web pages.of course the cloud-craplet thing it's 'sposed to be good at too....anyway, google's success is based on gathering data about you... (o, did i mention that?)

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I'm back to using IE7. The constant whirring of the drive when I'm using Chrome got to me. I have one little problem printing the Google calendar with IE and I'll fire up Chrome to do that since it works o.k. The text is a bit fuzzier with Chrome and I don't feel like playing with the settings to get it right. And since there's no WOT (Web Of Trust) for Chrome at the moment, I'm reluctant to do a search with Google in Chrome.

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the deal is that chrome launches a new instance of itself w/every tab. yikes!! so, it's doing a lot of work.per google, that's so when a website crashes a browser tab, the rest of the tabs run as they are a separate exe in a separate memory space.

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I have to say that I'm really surprised to see Google jumping into the browser wars.
I'm not sure they consider themselves as entering the browser wars as much as entering the OS war. With so many of Google's apps available online, Chrome + Google Desktop + Google Docs + Google Calendar = an online operating system. They can leave the hardware abstraction isssues to Microsoft while providing the portion of an operating system most people are familiar with. Your computer becomes a thin client. It's brilliant in a way, but will take time to sell to the masses and, more importantly, the enterprise customers. Businesses are not jumping on cloud computing in huge numbers.I too am pleased they changed their EULA. They do listen to their users.Each tab running as a separate process provides browser stability at the potential cost of the computer's stability. I don't know if it's as necessary a feature as they make it seem. When A Linux and Mac version comes along it will make less sense as I understand those OSs.I also dislike that no Google app I've installed ever asks where it should be installed. I have a partition for apps. They need to correct that soon.
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ah, mystery installs; that combined with the sure knowledge that google tracks all you do on the net leads to suspicious software (but isn't it all?)psgoogle will soon track what you are thinking...

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ah, mystery installs; ...google will soon track what you are thinking...
Ever since I put that water saver device on my commode, it no longer makes the sound of gurgle..gurgle..gurgle...It's more like google....google...google....They are getting in to everything! :rolleyes:
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I'm not sure they consider themselves as entering the browser wars as much as entering the OS war. With so many of Google's apps available online, Chrome + Google Desktop + Google Docs + Google Calendar = an online operating system. They can leave the hardware abstraction isssues to Microsoft while providing the portion of an operating system most people are familiar with. Your computer becomes a thin client. It's brilliant in a way, but will take time to sell to the masses and, more importantly, the enterprise customers. Businesses are not jumping on cloud computing in huge numbers.
I don't see that happening in mainstream until broadband connection becomes more prevalent and easily accessible in the United States. The US has the weakest broadband penetration (dial-up users versus broadband) compared to other european and asian countries. I really hope to see broadband over powerline take off. Not only will it help those who live in remote areas, but also provide some competition to the giants controlling the the majority of the market right now.And besides, does the idea of the 'thin client' really make sense considering all the firepower so readily available right now? I just built a quad-core system with 4 GB RAM and 4 HDD totaling 2 TB. Total cost including the case, psu and graphics card, yadda yadda.... was roughly around $900. Granted I purchased many of these parts at a good discount, cost of computer hardware has been going down steadily the last several years.
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does the idea of the 'thin client' really make sense
I think it may to mobile users, not so much to home/office users. Cell phones and netbook computers, both with small or non-existent hard drives, will be the customers for net apps. Being able to access your apps, documents and desktop while on the go is very tempting, especially now that DHS can seize your laptop/handheld at the airport. Frequent traveler's data will be safer online than on their devices.
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Frequent traveler's data will be safer online than on their devices.
You make an excellent point! I was against storing things online but if you fly, I can see where it makes perfect sense given the state of airport "security" checks.
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  • 2 weeks later...

I am still using and loving Chrome. I haven't launched Firefox since I installed Chrome. I've switched over to the Dev channel and even more bugs are fixed. Amazingly fast.I don't think Google is doing anything sinister, and besides, I've probably trusted them too many times in the past anyway, so it's too late for me!

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