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I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread for new users just starting out in Linux. I started out in Windows from 3.1 and went all the way through Win XP. Now I'm am fiddling with Red Hat release 9 at home. I expect to have quite a few questions. The manuals are just not helpful enough. Question number 1.Upon boot up, Red Hat displays the Gnome desktop. How do I switch to the X Window System? Or are these two related somehow? I want to try both to see their differences. Thanks!Steve H

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The X window system means that you have a GUI, Gnome is one of the GUI´s you can have, at login you can choose KDE or Gnome ( and a few others ) They have different graphics, different style, but can do the same. The more exotic ¨window-managers¨ are harder to work with for someone new, so I would stay away from them in the beginning.B) Bruno

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Thanks Bruno! No wonder there was no documentation on it!I asked this question because someone wrote that X Windows will mount the drives automatically. I don't see that feature. I managed to mount the floppy, use the OpenOffice Write program, type something, save it in txt format, get out of the program, and unmount the floppy. Then I was able to transfer the diskette to Win XP and read it successfully.My 5 year old loves to go through the screensavers and already has a favorite game. Does this mean a child can understand Linux? :lol: Steve H

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Looks like you´re having fun Steve ! Just mess around a bit on your system, don´t be afraid to experiment or break anything . . . most of us did a second install after a few days just to put things right again. A new install is no big deal so no worries.A little tip: if you click on the /mnt directory you will see ( after 30 sec. ) the /cdrom /floppy and your /win_c directory. That last one you can browse and you could paste that textfile you made in OpenOffice right into C:\My Documents ( no floppy needed for those actions ) Als if you have a xxx.doc in My Documents you can right-click it and open it in OpenOffice, edit the doc. and save it as .doc in your /home/steve directory in RedHat !Have Fun SteveB) Bruno

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It was easy to tell how full my hard drive was in Windows. Windows supplied a handy pie chart of free space and used space. How do I tell how much space is used/free in Red Hat Linux? Thanks!Steve H(Hope you like my new avatar. It is from my clip art CD for magicians.)

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I am at work without Linux at the moment but I am sure there is a tool in KDE that will give you nice, even better visual preview of your used/free disk space then in Windows.The name of the utility is Kdisk or similar.I will double check when I get home, under Gnome I am not sure B)

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I am at work without Linux at the moment but I am sure there is a tool in KDE that will give you nice, even better visual preview of your used/free disk space then in Windows.The name of the utility is Kdisk or similar.I will double check when I get home, under Gnome I am not sure  B)
Correct Zox: Kdiskfree ! I know, I´m to focused on the console, but it beats looking through the menu´s.;) Bruno
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Yea, I'm at school.... It's in the RH button... Disk Management or something. I think you can go to Hardware Detection too and then click on your hard drive.. Gives you a graph of sorts that displays all your partitions....Jon

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georgeg4

Hi Steve I am another newbie to RH9 and I thought I would jump in here and give you some newbie to newbie tips :P :ph34r: . These are subject to review from the rest of the forum of course. I am also fresh from WinXP and there are many differences as you said . One thing I have found convenient is you can customize your panel ( toolbar in windows ) First right click on any icon on your panel to remove it . And you can also right click on any app. and add it to the panel . For instance I have my Network Device Control on the panel so I don't have to find it each time when I want to go online . Others like Mail prog,Browser ( I use Galeon), Word Processor,ETCYou can also auto hide or manually hide the panel , And like Win. You can move it to any side of your monitor or unlike Win. you can create a floating panel if you like .P.S. I got my system with no documentation at all . Who needs documentation anyway it's more fun to find out for yourself :P ;)

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georgeg4

Back again Steve As far as mounting your disks is concerned there is an app under System tools/disk management where you can mount your Floppy and CDrom drives

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henderrob

I'm still a newbie and my focus is on learning KDE and Gnome desktops thoroughly while I slowly try the command line and vi, emacs,etc. I have six linux books that I'll work through but still so of us will likely stay with a GUI for daily use.

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