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About to install RedHat -- 1st time Linux!


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I am just downloading the Red Hat ISO files (with my cable modem it's just 3 hrs apiece to download) to my Compaq Presario. I'll download #3 when I get home from work tonight.Now, my Windows 98 OS is shot. When I bought a Sony Vaio, I uninstalled a lot of programs from the Presario to comply with the software legalese, and unfortunately the uninstalls appear to have uninstalled some important Windows dlls too. Also, since I had added an ATI video card, HP CD-ROM/burner and upped the RAM memory to 128MB, I can no longer do the Presario system restore CD because it needs the original configuration to work. (I don't have the Windows 98 CDs.) The original CD-ROM does not work, so I disconnected it, but the HP CD does. For some reason, I screwed up the video card and my beautiful 17" Viewsonic displays only 16 colors! All this happened a year ago and I had put the computer into storage. Now I've taken it out and want to play around with Linux on its 8GB drive as the sole OS. I'm downloading the Red Hat OS through my Sony system and will be burning the CDs soon. I'll also make a boot floppy diskette. I still have the download instructions to read. My question: Am I supposed to have a fully functional system before I get Windows working, or is it OK to let Linux take over despite the problems I've encountered? I know I should I not do a format c:/ and get it over with, because I have to be able to keep the CD-ROM working. I have yet to make a bootable floppy with the CD-ROM working. This is where I'm at so far. I don't really know the LInux lingo yet, but I'll learn. Any tips would be welcome. I'll read more of the posts on this Linux part of the Scots Newsletter and go slowly. Steve H

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I forgot -- I don't intend to hook up a printer, network or modem, so this installation will be kept very simple. Steve H

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Well Steve, welcome to the linux !Your questions: ( from bottom to top )

I have yet to make a bootable floppy with the CD-ROM working.
No it will probably boot from CD !
is it OK to let Linux take over despite the problems I've encountered?
Yep, don´t do anything on the windows site, just let Linux take over, it will ask you if it can use the full windows partition or only the free space, just tell it to take the full HD.
I'm downloading the Red Hat OS through my Sony system and will be burning the CDs soon
Did you do a good read about (Linux) ISO´s and how to burn them on CD ??? See the ¨sticky¨ thread Tips For Linux Starters ! ( Last 2 on page 6 about checksums and burning ISO´s. The windows version of checksum is on page 11 )Did you check if your Sony vaio is supported by RedHat ? Hardware databaseThe rest will be simple and straight forward, just post if you see any problems or have more questions !GOOD LUCK STEVE ! *crossing my fingersB) Bruno
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I've encountered a glitch already. My video card, ATI All-In-Wonder 128, is not supported. I took it out, and the default video driver is operational, although only 16 colors are supported. I can't seem to figure out what the video driver/card is in order to check for compatibility. Also, my hard drive is 8GB and a custom install requires nearly 8GB. Do I really need to do that large of an install? Tonight I'll work on the checksums of the iso's.Clarification: I am not instaling Linux on the Sony Vaio machine, but using the Sony machine to download and burn the CDs. I am putting Linux on my Compaq Presario 5150 machine.Thanks, Bruno!Steve H

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Hi SteveI can not find anything on the Compaq Presario 5150 either. Nor at RedHat nor Mandrake nor at LinuxHardware.org So that wiil just be an experiment. If it will install it will show more than the 16 colors you have in windows though.You could try VectorLinux they are more into support of laptops then any other distro.For RedHat you do not need the full 8 G in packages, you can leave the server part off and also the mail-clients and www browsers. That will slim down the amount of space you use. Do install X ( the GUI ) or else you will be left over to the commandline and that is not something a starter will be comfortable with.The checksums are indeed important.Good luck Steve !B) Bruno PS: Why don´t you do a ¨Live CD¨ first to check hardware compatibility ? ( See topic in the Tips page 11 )

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SteveTo make it easy for you, here is the Live CD text:

LIVE CD´sFor  those of you who first want to check if their hardware is supported under Linux, before trying to install a distro: Check out a ¨Live CD¨.Live CD´s are distro´s that run completely from CD, nothing is written to harddisk, no real install, but a fully functional operating system.You have to see it to believe it, in less then 10 minutes, you´ll have a Linux desktop.The really BIG advantage of a Live CD is the checking of supported hardware, once you see that your internet connection, monitor, keyboard, mouse, sound etc. are functioning, you can be sure that the distro you will choose after will support those items as well.The best and well known is Knoppix, Homepage, download ISO 700 MBThen there is SuSE Live evaluation, Homepage, download ISO 700 MB Also, recent version Slackware Live, Homepage, download ISO 200 MB ( ideal for dial-up users ) ( Read the doc´s ! )A bit older, DemoLinux, info Here 700 MBHave fun with your Linux testflight !
This looks like the best advice I can give you, seen that your laptop does not show up in any hardware list.Knoppix has the best hardware support, and can be installed on HD later. Slackware is the smallest download and the most modern one.B) Bruno
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Fully agree with Bruno; you can check out this distro (based on RedHat), that takes a grand total of four clicks from start to reboot your new Linux system:JAMD LinuxBeing based on RH 9, it's probably fine, but Bruno's suggestion should be taken first. B) Have fun, 'cause it is. B)

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I did see that one on distrowatch Quint, I like the logo of it ! Did you give it a testrun yourself ?B) Bruno

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Peachy

Go into System Settings>Display>Advanced to change the video driver. ATI All-in-Wonder, All-in-Wonder 128 Pro AGP, and All-in-Wonder 128 are listed. Don't know why it didn't autodetect it in the setup. But you can manually choose that if you scroll to the top of the ATI list.

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I did see that one on distrowatch Quint, I like the logo of it ! Did you give it a testrun yourself ?:D Bruno
Yes, and could not believe that there was anything so easy to install. B) It like you just d/l the iso, burn the CD, reboot, go away for 15 minutes, come back and answer 3 or 4 questions, reboot, and you're using a "RH clone"; I had but one problem (very minor): could only get an 800 x 600 resolution. :( What floored me was that it never even asked to configure the network card (thought I wouldn't be able to be on-line), but after re-boot, there was the site. :D Though I'm not experienced enough to judge, I don't think it's a keeper, but if someone wants the easiest OS install - bar none - this is it. B)
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Well this gives Steve plenty of choices then !Thanks, Quint, valuable advice as ever. ( Steve, Quint is our multiple distro tester ! )B) Bruno

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1. All right, I downloaded the three iso files from Red Hat. I also downloaded that checksum thingy and did a checksum of the files. However, I really don't know anything about the numbers, whether they are right or not. I must have missed where I am supposed to compare the numbers to?2. Also, I read that I cannot burn the iso files to CD the normal way. I cannot seem to find out any other way than what WinXP Home provides for me. Am I supposed to buy CD-burning software? (Remember, I am downloading this through my cable-internet Sony Vaio, burning it on the Sony, then transferring the files by CD-ROM to the Compaq Presario desktop computer. The Compaq does not have access to the internet. It's all screwed up.) If I do it the normal way, I'll end up with one big file on the CD, and that's not what we want, right?3. Also, instructions to make a boot diskette seem to assume I'm doing it from within Linux and not Win98. So it's not clear to me how I should go about this. The normal "Copy System Files" in Windows 98 won't work, right? I don't think that command will include the HP CD-Writer 9300 CD-ROM driver. 4. Bruno, my Compaq Presario 5160 is not a laptop, but a desktop. In the hardware and software support pages I find that my processor, AMD K6, is supported . . . isn't that enough? It's good to know that my 8GB drive is large enough. I eagerly await your advice. So far I have successfully resisted the impulse to fork over $39.99 at the local Staples for the Red Hat boxed set!Thanks again!Steve H

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1. All right, I downloaded the three iso files from Red Hat. I also downloaded that checksum thingy and did a checksum of the files. However, I really don't know anything about the numbers, whether they are right or not. I must have missed where I am supposed to compare the numbers to?2. Also, I read that I cannot burn the iso files to CD the normal way. I cannot seem to find out any other way than what WinXP Home provides for me. Am I supposed to buy CD-burning software? (Remember, I am downloading this through my cable-internet Sony Vaio, burning it on the Sony, then transferring the files by CD-ROM to the Compaq Presario desktop computer. The Compaq does not have access to the internet. It's all screwed up.) If I do it the normal way, I'll end up with one big file on the CD, and that's not what we want, right?3. Also, instructions to make a boot diskette seem to assume I'm doing it from within Linux and not Win98.  So it's not clear to me how I should go about this. The normal "Copy System Files" in Windows 98 won't work, right?  I don't think that command will include the HP CD-Writer 9300 CD-ROM driver. 4. Bruno, my Compaq Presario 5160 is not a laptop, but a desktop. In the hardware and software support pages I find that my processor, AMD K6, is supported . . .  isn't that enough? It's good to know that my 8GB drive is large enough. I eagerly await your advice.  So far I have successfully resisted the impulse to fork over $39.99 at the local Staples for the Red Hat boxed set!Thanks again!Steve H
This will get you started:Burn ISO filesChecksum
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Hey Steve,If you will notice on the page quint sent you there is a 15 day trial of Nero. Make sure you're following burning directions to the letter or you'll be in coaster heaven.mike180 ;)

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Hi Steve

4. Bruno, my Compaq Presario 5160 is not a laptop, but a desktop. In the hardware and software support pages I find that my processor, AMD K6, is supported . . . isn't that enough?
Steve I did read this tread from the beginning again and I have no clue why I had the idea you wanted to install on a laptop. Where did I get that from ? Anyways --> No laptop = No problem: On a ¨normal¨ PC you will have no problems at all. ;)
3. Also, instructions to make a boot diskette seem to assume I'm doing it from within Linux and not Win98. So it's not clear to me how I should go about this. The normal "Copy System Files" in Windows 98 won't work, right? I don't think that command will include the HP CD-Writer 9300 CD-ROM driver.
As you want to get rid of Windows completely from that PC you do not have to make a bootdisk ! ( only in the very rare case the PC does not want to boot from CD, after changing the BIOS, a floppy will have to be made, but let´s first see if it works the normal way. )
1. All right, I downloaded the three iso files from Red Hat. I also downloaded that checksum thingy and did a checksum of the files. However, I really don't know anything about the numbers, whether they are right or not. I must have missed where I am supposed to compare the numbers to?
On the server where you downloaded the ISO´s from there is also a small textfile you can download. That textfile contains the original md5sum ( string of numbers ) you need to compaire to the string you get as youo perform the checksum on the downloaded ISO´sDoing the checksum is important, the link Quint gave you is only for already burned CD´s in Linux , you need another ¨Tip¨ for the checksum of ISO¨s ( not yet burned ) in Windows on page 11 ( I will copy it in the next post here below !! )Burning ISO´s is critical, you have to follow the instructions 100% ( that link provided by Quint is O.K. ):) Bruno
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Steve just to be sure you´ve got the right text for ISO checksum:

Thought you might want some info about md5sum for Windows . . . .  it's very easy to do . . . . just go here and download the file http://www.etree.org/md5com.htmlYou want to copy the file to the proper directory:Windows 95/98/Me: Download md5sum.exe to c:\windows\command Windows NT/2000/XP: Download md5sum.exe to your c:\winnt\system32Then open a command prompt: Windows 95/98/Me: Start -> Run... -> command Windows NT/2000: Start -> Run... -> cmdThen browse to wherever you downloaded the .iso file:ex: c:\downloadstype the following command:  md5sum [filename].isoit will then spit out the check which you can compare to the check listed at the download site.*NOTE* Make sure you do this with the .iso file before you burn it! :)
Let us know if you have any more questions, better ask once to much, then be disapointed in the end. ;);) Bruno
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We are just bombarding you with all sorts of info, huh? I've used alot of diffirent burning software... Xp home comes with Roxio Easy CD Creator 5 Basic. Just use that. It's the easiest thing you could use... All you have to do is double click on the image file and it starts burning..... Can't get any easier than that.... Just do it at 4x to be on the safe side. I've made a few coasters by trying to burn at max or even at 8x for that matter.... Good luckJon

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Jonq357,Ah, but I use XP Pro and it does not work that way. You must have a third party burner to work.Sorry, I just reread Steve's posts and see that he is using XP Home also. So, you are Right.mike180 ;) :)

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Doing the checksum is important, the link Quint gave you is only for already burned CD´s in Linux , you need another ¨Tip¨ for the checksum of ISO¨s ( not yet burned ) in Windows on page 11 ( I will copy it in the next post here below !! )
Thanks, Bruno, got ahead of myself, while trying to help. :D
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It looks like the next few steps will be easy then. 1. Find the site where I downloaded the shrike***.iso files and get the checksum numbers from the text file. Compare them with what I have have. Download again if they do not match.2. Find Roxio Easy on my XP Home and burn the CDs. If I can't find Roxio, I'll see if my other CD burner software is compatible with XP and install that. Oh, yeah, try double-clicking on the iso files and see if CD burner software comes up.3. Start the boot process and get into the BIOS to change to boot from CD. Now, I cant' remember which F key to hold down for the BIOS. Anybody remember? 4. Insert the first CD and boot from CD. Then follow any instructions and/or questions. This seems almost TOO easy! <_< But I'm not out of the woods yet. ;) Thanks!Steve H

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3. Start the boot process and get into the BIOS to change to boot from CD. Now, I cant' remember which F key to hold down for the BIOS. Anybody remember?
Believe it varies, on mine, need to press "delete"; it should say somewhere on the screen as you are booting. You will do fine. <_<
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Peachy
3. Start the boot process and get into the BIOS to change to boot from CD. Now, I cant' remember which F key to hold down for the BIOS. Anybody remember?
Compaq uses F10 don't they? <_<
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Well, Steve, actually it IS that easy !What key to press for the BIOS to come up on the screen is different for all computers, most of them ¨Del¨ does the trick, some F8 some F10 some F2 ( PB ) . I think compac uses the F8, but I´m absolutely not sure here, also you have to hit the key at the right time, I remember compac as a tough one, there was a little white line in the left top corner that came up, at that exact moment you had to hit the F8.Anyway the guys in the hardware forum might be of help there if you do get stuck in that early stage.Downloading, checksum, those you seem to have understood right. For the the Burning of the ISO´s I personaly only trust Nero, but then I only burn ISO´s in Linux environnement with Linux tools.In a nutshell: the ISO is 1 file, as soon as burned to CD, on the CD itself there have to be several files !Good luck Steve, and don´t worry too much, you can always just start again, nothing lost . . . . be relaxed !<_< Bruno

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I hit a brick wall. I installed Click'N Burn CD burning software and it did not separate the iso file into separate files. Also, I have been unable to get to the BIOS to switch the boot to CD. Any ideas?Thanks!Steve H

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greengeek
;) Some Compaq's automatically detect if there is a bootable CD in the drive, you might not have a setting for it in the BIOS.Mostly happy Compaq owner!
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My Compaq did not notice the CD with the Red Hat iso file on it for automatic bootup. First the iso file has to be divided up into different files upon burning to CD, I believe. My default Click'N Burn program burned the file 'as is' rather than breaking it up into its component files. Are there particular settings in the CD burn software to create it properly? Thanks!Steve H

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My Compaq did not notice the CD with the Red Hat iso file on it for automatic bootup. First the iso file has to be divided up into different files upon burning to CD, I believe. My default Click'N Burn program burned the file 'as is' rather than breaking it up into its component files. Are there particular settings in the CD burn software to create it properly? Thanks!Steve H
Steve_H,I'm not familiar with that software, but would believe that somewhere in the "settings" or "options", there is a selection something like "create CD from image file"; believe that is what you need. Nero was what I always used in Windows - easy and reliable, but I'm sure what you have is capable...just keep looking, you'll find it. :blink: Linux awaits you. :D
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Hondanut

You could use Nero. This is what I use to burn iso images in XP Professional. After its installed just follow the wizard and choose other cd formats and it will let you choose iso image. Or even simpler you can just right click on the image file and select "open with Nero burning " Just knock your burn speed down to make sure you get a good copy. I run it half of the speed that the burner claims its capable of. I have a enough of a collection of coasters now :blink: You can download the program from here http://download.com.com/3000-2646-10201921...ml?tag=lst-0-12

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Okay, I downloaded Nero and burned the first iso and put it in the computer -- it worked! Red Hat is NOW loading! :DIt is WAY past my bedtime and RH has 299 packages yet to install. I have to knock off now.THANKS TO ALL WHO HELPED!! <_< Steve H

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