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connecting router to router, can it be done?


kshef
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You can not Amplify the signal but you can place the second Wireless Router in a location that would provide more/better Wireless coverage than one Wireless Router by it self.If your Router is WDS capable it can be used as a Repeater (look at the data sheet and see if it mentions WDS capacity).Link: Wireless Network - Configuration Modes.Otherwise you can use the any Wireless Router as a switch with an Access Point. However you would need to connect it to the first Router with a CAT5e cable.Link to: Using a Wireless Cable/DSL Router as a Switch with an Access Point] :thumbsup:

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I am doing exactly this in my home right now. I have a Linksys BEFSR81 Router connected to the WAN (CM) and on port 8 of that router I have it connected to a Linksys WRT54GS Wireless Router. I turned off the router function on the wrt and pointed it to the gateway address of the BEFSR81. I also set DHCP on the BEFSR81 and disabled it on the WRT I also set the WRT to a static IP address in the IP range of the BEFSR81.(I originally had a WAP54G that the radio died in and it worked in much the same way)If you are asking about running multiple Wireless Routers. Well if they are actually both Routers one will have to be configured as just an Access Point or may be setup as a Repeater if it can be. We have run up to 4 AP's in the same building to get good coverage. (15,000 square feet. Wired them all to 10baseT.) A given wireless device will use an AP until signal goes down and will search for others and connect. It get's a bit confusing from there unless you really know how to set up multiple AP's in close proximity.If all you really want is to amplify the signal. You might want to look for better antenna's or if your home has multiple floors you can set one up in the basement and on the second floor. Don't forget to secure all the wireless devices you have with the proper encryption and MAC address requirements.

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to simplify:yes, but it's not "amplify"you can connect as many wireless routers as you feel you can affordessentially string a few dozen over a mile or so, wirelessly of course - no physical connection needed between any of them

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maybe amplify wasnt the best word to use :whistling: still kinda new to wireless networkingok this other router i am trying to connect is a netgear wgr614, at the start of setup it looks for a lan cable connected to it for the internet connectionhow can i get past the setup wizard and manually configure the settings?

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i can't goto 192.168.1.1 but i can go through 192.168.0.1thats what takes me into the netgear smart wizard, searches for a connection, can't find it, and then i cant go any where from thereis there a way i can setup the router without using this wizard?

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Netgear made "strange" choices (it probably was designed by the marketing department) concerning the log-on into the WGR604v5. :whistling: You can log directly into the Router by typing into the Address bar of the browser:http://www.routerlogin.net/basicsetting.htmIf you did not change any thing the log on user name is: adminPassword is the word: passwordMake a URL link of the above address so you can always log onto the Router. :thumbsup:

Edited by JackR
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  • 1 month later...

Get a cross-over ethernet cable and connect the router directly to a PC that has a static IP address in the 192.168.0.x network just like the router. You should be able to configure the router, make the changes and then lose the connection. If all goes well, when you connect it to the other router you should be able to communicate with it again. This is how I turned my D-Link DI-614 wireless router into a simple access point. I temporarily set one of my workstation's IP address to 192.16.0.2 and connected it to the D-Link using a cross-over cable. I logged into the admin page of the D-Link at 192.168.0.1. I then turned of the DHCP, and routing features, set the router's IP address to 192.168.1.2 so it would be seen on the wired LAN. Applied the settings and when I lost the connection I knew the changes should have taken place. At this point I then took the D-Link and attached a normal ethernet patch cable and plugged it into a switch on my home LAN. I checked if I could talk to the router by logging into its new IP address. Yes. Now, I have a wireless access point that behaves like a simple switch.

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