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Machine vs. Man - Could It Happen?


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Preposterous.

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm
     
  2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
     
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

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V.T. Eric Layton

Preposterous.

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm
     
  2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
     
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

 

Been keeping up with your Asimov reading, eh Webb? ;)

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And my Philip K. Dick. If you're worried about them going rogue just limit their lifespans.

 

deck_leon_1.jpeg

 

Leon: How old am I?

Deckard: I dunno.

Leon: My birthday is April 10, 2017. How long do I live?

Deckard: Four years.

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V.T. Eric Layton

If that method had worked, Deckard would have been out of a job in Blade Runner. ;)

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V.T. Eric Layton

Lucky Deckard! At least he got a job again at his age. Unfortunately, I haven't been called out of retirement to whack any misbehaving bots lately. I'm patiently waiting...

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amenditman

Preposterous.

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm
     
  2. A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
     
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Laws are broken all the time.

Usually by those who write them!

Then we all pay the consequences.

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I presume the laws were written by humans but they apply to robots for the protection of humans. It is illogical that one who wrote them could or would break them.

 

If these laws are broken all the time can you provide an instance?

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amenditman

I presume the laws were written by humans but they apply to robots for the protection of humans. It is illogical that one who wrote them could or would break them.

 

If these laws are broken all the time can you provide an instance?

Not those laws specifically!

All laws written by politicians for our corporate good.

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Guest LilBambi

Ah, love books! As noted I have been re-reading Isaac Asimov's Robot Series. I am on the first one Caves of Steel.

 

I read them last year too. I love Asimov!

 

I also love Philip K. Dicks books as well and the movies that have been made from his stories and books.

 

I wish they would do a good movie based on Isaac Asimov's Robot Series -- like they did with Bicentennial Man with Robin Williams and I, Robot with Wil Smith. These stories were somewhat different or quite a bit different from the books as many movies are).

 

The, at first unwilling (on Elijah Baley's part) of working with a robot, and to get to the end of the series when R. Daneel Olivaw goes to see Elijah Baley when he is dying at the very end of a long life -- quite a difference from being so distasteful to being called friend.

 

Regarding my favorite Asimov Robots from Wikipedia:

 

R. Daneel Olivaw

 

R. Daneel Olivaw is a fictional robot created by Isaac Asimov. The "R" initial in his name stands for "Robot," a naming convention in Asimov's future society. Olivaw appears in Asimov's Robot andFoundation series, most notably in the novels The Caves of Steel,The Naked Sun, The Robots of Dawn, Robots and Empire, Prelude to Foundation, Forward the Foundation, Foundation and Earth as well as the short story Mirror Image. Since he also appears in all of the books of the Second Foundation Trilogy, Daneel is the most commonly appearing Asimov character. He was constructed immediately prior to the age of the Settlers, and lived at least until the formation of Galaxia, thus spanning the entire history of the First Empire.

 

R. Giskard Reventlov also very interesting robot with amazing abilities but is an old robot and still looks like a robot.

 

Together these two robots were amazing in the books.

 

I

Edited by LilBambi
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Temmu

And my Philip K. Dick. If you're worried about them going rogue just limit their lifespans.

 

Leon: How old am I?

Deckard: I dunno.

Leon: My birthday is April 10, 2017. How long do I live?

Deckard: Four years.

 

 

i just bought the re-mastered bladerunner dvd which included new glass-shattering, and other updated effects.

the story line seems unaltered, which is good.

 

------------

 

i think it is currently possible to have rogue machines.

take a drone, for example, that may have targeting instructions per-programmed just before launch. if its link to ground control fails, and its instructions scrambled, say via lightning strike, it could complete a destructive, unplanned mission.

one could realistically stretch that to several simultaneous failures for a rather catastrophic result.

 

but, at this time, i think it improbable for a nation of robots, androids, etc. to form a cohesive army with a plan. a hundred years from now? maybe!

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