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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Masterclass in Why 48 FPS Fails


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Guest LilBambi

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Masterclass in Why 48 FPS Fails - Gizmodo

 

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I am still very hopeful about this movie but I definitely want to see it in standard 2D and part of that is what they talk about in this review more of 48 FPS than The Hobbit.

 

Peter Jackson, a terrifically talented film maker and pioneer of new cinema technology, has given the world of cinema a very important, and perhaps unintended, gift with his latest film "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey," as we wrap the year 2012.

 

But as I read the article, I realized that magic needs the ability to hide what they don't want seen as much as it needs clarity. As the article notes, 24 FPS does allow that to happen and why it stands the test of time.

 

I recommend any filmmaker out there try doing this—as it will reaffirm so many of the things that make film "magical" and ultimately what differentiates the medium from all other forms of entertainment and visual media. For some, HFR will be a potential a new tool in their arsenal for telling certain types of stories in a new and exciting way, while others will be reminded of why the 2D format at 24 fps has stood the test of time for so long.

 

And this is so true!

 

In my opinion, film is not necessarily about WHAT you see—but it's almost more an exercise in what you DON'T or CAN'T see. The best directors and DPs show you only what is relevant to the story and never introduce a random shot or character if they can at all avoid it. I've always preached that a director or photographer should INCLUDE elements in a frame or shots that add to the story, and EXCLUDE elements or shots that detract from it.

 

What are your thoughts? Have you seen it in any/all of these venues like this guy has?

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Guest LilBambi

The paragraph after the last one I noted explains why he feels this way about 48 FPS in comparison to the standard 24 FPS.

 

I have noted that on large screens today, often things already appeared with too much detail, showing up makeup or lack of it on movies and TV shows, etc. And that was before the 48 FPS.

 

Peter Jackson is one of my all time favorite Directors and I love what he has done for the Tolkien franchise! I am not dissing him or the movie The Hobbit, which I really want to see!

Edited by LilBambi
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and the "too much information" problem with these technologies is why the 'adult entertainment' sector stopped using them. and with out that sector using, debugging and buying the costs and features are not going to move much to the consumer sector.

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abarbarian

I think I am going to see The Hobbit over xmas in York as it has a decent cinema. 2D version only but I am not bothered about 3D as I think it is over rated and not really needed for movies or games. :shifty:

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Guest LilBambi

Another quote from the very long and well worth reading article noted in the first posting here.

 

In the opening hour of The Hobbit shown in 3D HFR—I don't recall hearing a single sigh, or laugh. Not one. When I went to see the exact same scene with an audience of the same size on a 2D projection—I heard regular chuckles and laughter...why? Again more on that in a bit—but this was palpable and very interesting for me to witness. All of the jokes seems to be falling flat or being missed in the HFR projection.

 

Heard that crp and abarbarian.

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Guest LilBambi

Yes, that was a great movie too for it's day, very cutting edge. There were some sad things related to The Wizard of Oz too as noted in the IMDb Trivia page for the movie here:

 

Ray Bolger was originally cast as the Tin Man. However, he insisted that he would rather play the Scarecrow - his childhood idol, Fred Stone had originated that role on stage in 1902. Buddy Ebsen had been cast as the Scarecrow, and now switched roles with Bolger. Unbeknownst to him, however, the make-up for the Tin Man contained aluminum dust, which ended up coating Ebsen's lungs. He also had an allergic reaction to it. One day he was physically unable to breathe and had to be rushed to hospital. The part was immediately recast and MGM gave no public reason why Ebsen was being replaced. The actor considered this the biggest humiliation he ever endured and a personal affront. When Jack Haley took over the part of the Tin Man, he wasn't told why Ebsen had dropped out (and in the meantime, the Tin Man make-up had changed from aluminum dust to aluminum paste as one of its key components). However, his vocals remain whenever the song "We're off to see the Wizard" is played. Jack Haley's vocals were never used during the song, but were used for "If I Only Had a Heart" and "If I Only Had the Nerve." Ebsen's vocals are also heard in the extended version of "If I were King of the Forest," though the spoken segment has Jack Haley. Although no Ebsen footage from the film has ever been released, surviving still photos show him taking part in the Wicked Witch's castle sequence.

 

It doesn't change my love for the film. I do appreciate more what Buddy Ebsen went though. Of course, we all would never get to see him in that part and Jack Haley is of course the definitive Tin Man in all our minds and hearts but ...

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i cannot imagine watching a film in 3d.

it would detract from the plot & images shown before me.

3d is great for mall-based gimbaled, moving trailers that house realistic jet-fighter or roller coaster rides

1 in 100 movies might benefit from 3d,

a film intentionally written for it

(but i imagine that would lack plot & good acting...)

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i cannot imagine watching a film in 3d.

it would detract from the plot & images shown before me.

3d is great for mall-based gimbaled, moving trailers that house realistic jet-fighter or roller coaster rides

1 in 100 movies might benefit from 3d,

a film intentionally written for it

(but i imagine that would lack plot & good acting...)

Hard to imagine a movie lacking plot and good acting :D
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Hard to imagine a movie lacking plot and good acting :D

actually, you are correct. I did multiple searches for the phrase "movie lacking plot and good acting" and got no matches for both.
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  • 2 weeks later...

actually, you are correct. I did multiple searches for the phrase "movie lacking plot and good acting" and got no matches for both.

 

lol!

now that is funny! as most movies are both!

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