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Arch Linux on sda3 grub 2 from Debian already installed


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Hi.

 

I have a pc with Debian and Ubuntu where sda3 is free and I want arch on it.

 

I have Debian managing grub 2 on MBR. When I installed Ubuntu on sda2 I made Ubuntu install grub on sda2 and then on Debian I run 'update-grub' and it found Ubuntu and added it to the menu.

 

Now with arch, which method should I follow?

 

Thanks

 

Guillermo

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securitybreach

Well when it asks to install Grub during the Arch installation, choose to install it to the partition instead of the mbr. Then just add an Arch entry on your debian menu.lst:

 

# (3) Arch Linux
title  Arch Linux
root   (hd0,2)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/sda3 ro
initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img

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Greetings Guillermo, good to see you again. Actually I would install Arch on sda3 and not install grub at all. Just make sure sda3 is set as root and add it to your grub config file in debian so that it shows on your grub menu at boot.

 

Make sure to install the December Arch install media as it is already configured with systemd. If you run into any issues, don't hesitate to let us know. :)

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Greetings Guillermo, good to see you again. Actually I would install Arch on sda3 and not install grub at all. Just make sure sda3 is set as root and add it to your grub config file in debian so that it shows on your grub menu at boot.

 

Make sure to install the December Arch install media as it is already configured with systemd. If you run into any issues, don't hesitate to let us know. :)

 

Thanks for your quick reply.

 

I am using the latest media. I am using this one: http://archlinux.supsec.org/iso/2012.12.01/archlinux-2012.12.01-dual.iso

 

I have seen it is now closer to Gentoo installation rather than Debian installation. I have not installed it for some two years, I just upgraded my system before. Now I am performing a clean installation.

 

I am following this instructions.

 

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Installation_Guide to install it on a X86_64 system.

 

So, what you are saying is that I should skip the grub installation completely, and then let Grub from Debian find it by running update-grub ?

 

thanks.

 

Guillermo.

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securitybreach

It is really up to you but I personally would install grub to the Arch partition and make a grub entry on debian but Ian's way would work as well.

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V.T. Eric Layton

...I would install Arch on sda3 and not install grub at all. Just make sure sda3 is set as root and add it to your grub config file in debian so that it shows on your grub menu at boot.

 

 

This manual method is the way I have always included new operating systems in my GRUB. I'm using legacy GRUB, though, but it should work the same way in GRUB2, I believe.

 

Feliz Navidad to you and your family, Guillermo! :)

 

~Eric

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This manual method is the way I have always included new operating systems in my GRUB. I'm using legacy GRUB, though, but it should work the same way in GRUB2, I believe.

 

Feliz Navidad to you and your family, Guillermo! :)

 

~Eric

 

Thanks Eric.

 

I just have one doubt. What does he means by being sure it is set as root?

 

is that the boot flag in fdisk?

or just that I may have just one partition where /sda3 is /

that is what I am doing, no separate /home /boot or any other, just one / at /dev/sda3

 

Merry Christmas for you and loved ones too.

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V.T. Eric Layton

No, I think he just means that the sda3 must be the root partition. He will elaborate, if we're not understanding fully.

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Well, it worked.

 

On debian I mounted the Arch Partition

 

mount /dev/sda3 /mnt

then I run

os-prober

 

then

 

update-grub

 

and that was it.

reboot, choose Arch and I am happy!

 

Thanks!

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I don't think it's necessary to mount the partition or install GRUB to it. When you run os-prober it looks for all kernels in all partitions and lists them in config file so update-grub can use them.

It's even easier in siduction, update-grub automatically runs os-prober so it all happens with just the one command.

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V.T. Eric Layton

It worked. That's what matters, not the method. It's great to have OPTIONS! That's what Linux is all about. :yes:

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I don't think it's necessary to mount the partition or install GRUB to it. When you run os-prober it looks for all kernels in all partitions and lists them in config file so update-grub can use them.

It's even easier in siduction, update-grub automatically runs os-prober so it all happens with just the one command.

 

I had to mount as it was not working without it. On Debian update-grub also runs OS-prober. But it not worked until I've mounted the arch partition. With Ubuntu it had no problems.

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securitybreach

Well, it worked.

 

On debian I mounted the Arch Partition

 

mount /dev/sda3 /mnt

then I run

os-prober

 

then

 

update-grub

 

and that was it.

reboot, choose Arch and I am happy!

 

Thanks!

 

Excellent!! :thumbsup:

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