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Postbox founded by the original Thunderbird Team


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Guest LilBambi

An Awesome Alternative for Thunderbird Users - Postbox Blog

 

The Web is buzzing about the recent Thunderbird announcement:

But the news isn’t all bad. Mozilla will still address high-risk/high-impact security vulnerabilities through their Extended Support Releases program for one year.

 

However, it’s clear that continued innovation in Thunderbird is not a priority for Mozilla’s product efforts.

If you are a Thunderbird user, now is the perfect time to try Postbox! It’s the most intuitive, powerful, easy to use, and drop-dead gorgeous email application available. But don’t take our word for it, hear what our converts have to say about Postbox.

And now, we have some really nice news to share…

 

This is not a totally free product, nor is it a totally Open Source product:

 

NEW! - Our “Almost Free” Price of Only $9.95!

 

Postbox 3 is now available at an incredible “almost free” price of only $9.95! We can’t think of a less expensive way for you to take control of an overloaded inbox, improve your workflow, and achieve peace of mind.

 

Seriously, $9.95! That’s less than a movie ticket or a nice glass of wine. We’ve seen small blocks of cheese that go for more!

 

I have to say, it sounds great. It has an awesome list of features. You can try it before you buy for $9.95. There are no iOS versions available either sadly.

 

In some ways it reminds me a bit of the Sparrow email client (now owned by Google, BTW) for iPhone/iPad and Mac (Mac version is $9.99, but also comes in a Sparrow Lite version ad supported version for free. Both are also available on the Mac App Store).

 

Back to Postbox, as I say it has some great features that can be found on the article and I do mean a lot of great features! And if you are wondering about how Mozilla's Thunderbird announcement impact Postbox ... basically not at all except for the better at least for Windows and Mac users as you can see below:

 

How does the Mozilla announcement impact Postbox development?

 

Postbox was founded by the original Thunderbird team close to five years ago. At that time, a version of the source code was forked and the team has been innovating in its own direction ever since.

 

As such, we expect that the Mozilla announcement will not materially impact Postbox development, and we welcome all Thunderbird users to give Postbox a try!

Is Postbox Open Source?

 

Not entirely, however, a source code version of certain portions of Postbox that may constitute “Covered Code” (as defined in the Mozilla Public License) is available for anyone to use, modify, and distribute free-of-charge at: www.postbox-inc.com/coveredcode under the Mozilla Public License and other open source software licenses.

Is there a Linux Version of Postbox?

 

We do not have plans for a Linux version at this time, however, we will continue to monitor customer demand.

 

Much more in the article.

 

Of course, not being open source fully, Linux Thunderbird users will likely just move to Gnome Evolution.

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V.T. Eric Layton

If I were using Windows as my primary OS, I'd just use WinMail or something like that. I don't see the "awesomeness" of Post Box. From the looks of it, they've jacked some GPL'd Mozilla code and made some mods to justify converting it to a proprietary app. Ten bucks isn't unreasonable, but since I don't run Windows, I don't find anything appealing about this piece of software. I'll stick with my TB in Linux. :)

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Guest LilBambi

Me too. I will continue using TB for some time to come, but I am starting to look for a replacement for when it starts to look long in the tooth. ;)

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V.T. Eric Layton

I have faith that TB will survive in some form or another. I do believe the community will not let it die. Mozilla threatened to end Seamonkey (formerly known as Mozilla Browser) years ago. It's still alive and kickin'. :)

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Guest LilBambi

They have already stated it's basically on life support, you know, like Windows XP ... security updates only.

 

And like Windows XP and the new Office 2013 situation, soon Thunderbird might be too long in the tooth to port to new versions of OSes.

 

We can still enjoy it as they will continue to do security updates, but no new features and eventually it will go the way of the dodo if a fresh group of developers doesn't come forth and weigh in to keep it going for more than life support.

 

Sad reality, but reality it is.

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Guest LilBambi

And believe me, it hurts me to say it. I love Thunderbird. Used it since beta. It's a wonderful email client. But I am no developer, and the original Thunderbird Team jumped ship to create Postbox, a pay to play product. Albeit a very reasonably priced and awesome pay to play product.

 

So as I say, unless some good open source developers step up to the plate....

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V.T. Eric Layton

I'll make a bet with you. I'll bet you it's still usable in oh... let's say 2015. :)

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Its just an email client, as long as the basic msWndows plumbing is around it will do just fine.

Heck, I have users of Eudora 4 (!) , Eudora 7 and Pegausus 3.x on the LAN.

 

On another note, I just found out on Friday that Thunderbird allows one to assign multiple labels as tags to an email and that one can create their own labels. Now if i can just figure out a way to have the IMAP server save the labels ....

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V.T. Eric Layton

IMAP doesn't work that way. Your data stays on their servers and must sync with your client. However, to get around that, you can set up local folders and then transfer important mails to them and label as needed. That's how I do it. Besides, I prefer to have my stuff on MY system. See figure below:

 

th_TB_common_shot-1.png

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Guest LilBambi

IMAP doesn't work that way. Your data stays on their servers and must sync with your client. However, to get around that, you can set up local folders and then transfer important mails to them and label as needed. That's how I do it. Besides, I prefer to have my stuff on MY system. See figure below:

 

th_TB_common_shot-1.png

 

You don't want to see the folder structure I have on Thunderbird! LOL! I have been keeping stuff locally in folders for many years now in Thunderbird originally on Windows, then Linux, then Mac. I don't even want to tell you how old this profile is.

 

I love that I can take the Thunderbird profile to any OS. It's what makes it so great!

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V.T. Eric Layton

You don't want to see the folder structure I have on Thunderbird! LOL! I have been keeping stuff locally in folders for many years now in Thunderbird originally on Windows, then Linux, then Mac. I don't even want to tell you how old this profile is.

 

I love that I can take the Thunderbird profile to any OS. It's what makes it so great!

 

HAHA! I know what you mean. My current TB profile is at least 6 years old. I use it on all my systems. Actually, on my main system it is on a common partition and both Slackware and Arch share it (same for Firefox and Seamonkey). Once a month I sit at my laptop and shop systems and ssh into my main system to copy those main profiles as a way of updating the laptop and shop. Works pretty smoothly. :)

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V.T. Eric Layton

Egads, woman! Don't you throw anything out? My TB profile is a lightweight 345M currently.

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