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"Segmentation Fault" in Gnome...


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I just couldn't leave things alone. ;) Now will probably wind up re-installing Mandrake 9.1. ;) Whenever I attempt to enter Control Center, while in Gnome, I get this message about a "segmentation fault"; it does not occur in KDE. What have I done now? ;) Any help would be greatly appreciated,

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Can't help you there. But segmentation faults are usually the result of a badly written program. You might have to check if Mandrake has an update for that. If you know what you want to change, there may be another tool or command line tool I can suggest you use to get the same results.

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Can't help you there. But segmentation faults are usually the result of a badly written program. You might have to check if Mandrake has an update for that. If you know what you want to change, there may be another tool or command line tool I can suggest you use to get the same results.
Thanks, peachy. Been reading alot about this at Linux help sites, but the prognosis is not good. :D It more or less said that I needed to be proficient in actual programming to correct it. :( Was wondering if I re-installed "over top" of the existing version, if that might correct whatever it was I did. :blink: Thanks again,
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Quint:If you do a re-install , just format the "/" partition, leave "/home" as it is, this way all your settings , mail, bookmarks etc. will be saved.Here is the point to make the choice mentioned above : http://www.mandrakelinux.com/en/doc/90c/en...Partitions.htmlSee, they do only hda1 and hda5 and NOT hda7, in your case you will only have hda1, because your /usr will not be on a seperate partition.This image is from 9.0, the 9.1 version will not be much different ! PS:I checked, the visuals are a bit different, but it comes down to the same, first you get: "DarkX partitioning wizard found the following solutions" choose "use existing partition" The next screen is: "Choose the partitions you want to format" choose only the top one " / " Then proceed !Now that we're at it: tne next screen is choosing packages, do choose "Development" as well. This will come in handy later !Don't feel bad about it, we all did re-installs when learning to master Linux !Bruno

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Quint:If you do a re-install , just format the "/" partition, leave "/home" as it is, this way all your settings , mail, bookmarks etc. will be saved.
As long as you have / and /home on different partitions. Nothing like having the whole filesystem on a single partition until it's too late. :blink:
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Guest LilBambi

Three times' a charm ... I reinstalled my first Mandrake Linux 3 times before I got it how I liked it and was satisfied with the partition sizes, etc.BTW: If you look at the Updates thread for Mandrake the Control Panel is one that was updated in I believe 9.1 (not sure which one you are using).Linux is a learning curve...but a fun one!

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Quint:Don't forget Mandrake Update after the re-install ! ( remember the 100MB ? )EDIT: Quint, before re-install try this: ( while you're in KDE )< su >< rm -rf ~/.gnome > ( dot gnome ) This will remove the settings for gnome, they will be autogenerated at next login. It might just do the trick. :blink: Bruno

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Bruno, Peachy, Fran, Thanks very much. You're all more helpful than the places I've been visiting, reading, absorbing, and dreading. :blink: Before re-install, I will try that line, Bruno. Alas, peachy, I only had a single partition and swap. Fran, I had it pretty much functional, don't want to try for three just yet; but it is fun. :)I'm sure grateful to you all, and to this great forum; talk to you later, have a date with a sultry penguin. :D

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Quit,You say you have only one partition: IMPOSSIBLE !Mandrake makes 3 partitions as default: " / " , " /home" and "swap" Bruno

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Guest LilBambi

quint --LOL! One thing you learn early with Linux ... don't put all your eggs in one partition and then you won't be as anxious about reinstallations.You will probably want at least the following partitions://usr/home/swapmaybe even /boot too.Got a large drive? Then add a partition for extra storage as well.The actual sizes will vary according to your disk space available; but remember that /usr will probably end up with the lion's share of the 'need for space' over time.Others may have come up with the exact percentages and other ideas about specific partitions, but I generally just make sure that;/usr - has a nice large space because progs are installed here/swap - is twice the size of ram (nowadays don't know if that is feasible)/ - root partition won't run out of space (system lives here!)/boot - 10-15megs in case you want extra room for extra kernels/home - enough space for personal files, etc.If you have space:/storage - extra space that can be used for anything including RPMs to keep them nearby

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Quit,You say you have only one partition: IMPOSSIBLE !Mandrake makes 3 partitions as default:  " / " ,  " /home"  and "swap" Bruno
Bruno,Was hoping, but the line you suggested didn't do it. :D I guess I was mistaken when I thought that "/home" was a folder. I knew from installation that "/" was the root partition, and there was also a "Linux Swap" partition, but I thought home, usr, etc were folders. I'm glad that I'm on a continual learning process, keeps my mind off of growing old. :blink: I'm off to "Re-Install Heaven".
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Quint:To be exact: /home is folder, but it lives on a seperate partition ! :blink: Have fun with the re-install ! :D Bruno

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Guest LilBambi

quint --You might want to try doing a 'df' (sans quotes) at a command prompt or terminal window in the GUI to see what partitions you actually have.It is difficult to tell what's a folder and what's a partition from a file manager. :blink:

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Or less | /etc/fstab to see your filesystem partition table and where your mount points are. Bruno, it looks like Quint changed the default settings from DrakX to make it all one partition and swap. Instead of re-installing, I've been Ghosting my Linux partition with a known good image when I muck something up real good. Interesting to see I've taken the lessons I've learned from years of working with Windows 98 and applying it to Linux!

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:P  I only partition a / and /swap  is that bad?  I have always done it that way.
Havnblast:"Bad" is to much said, but: Everything in one partition is not a good idea, at least you should have a seperate /home partition and give it space enough to grow. The clever thing about a /home partition is that when you do a re-install or upgrade you can leave it as it is, saving all your personal settings, mail, addressbook etc.Do read the post of LilBambi, ( 6 posts back ) she gives a good lead about partitioning.I'll add an item in "Tips for Linux starters" about partitioning, looks like more people are looking for info on it. :huh: Bruno
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Just wanted to thank all of you for the pertnent info you've given; the install went smooth, before this I burned a CD of all important data, and now I'm in the process of returning to where I was. Again thanks all, and "keep those tips acomin". :huh:

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