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BSD or Linux and Concerns on Dual Booting


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SonicDragon

I was just wondering which is better; BSD or Linux? In everything i read, BSD seems the be the best choise for servers. It's more stable, secure, etc., but what about desktops. How easy is it, is it as well documented? Can u use linux apps?I am new to *nix and desperatly want to get my feet wet. But i upgraded from ME to XP with an update disk. If i install a *nix and something goes wrong, will i have to install Me and then XP or can i just use the update disk?Thanks!

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Guest ThunderRiver

OpenBSD for router/ftp/http server and the equilivant Linux distro would be Debian/SlackwareFreeBSD for workstation and the equilivant Linux distro would be somewhere between Gentoo and SuSe.One rule that you should always keep in mind. If you want to dual boot between Linux and BSD, make sure you install BSD first and then Linux second. Perhaps, you could do it the other way aruond, but it is easier to break things though.I know for sure that OpenBSD has comprehensive guide on how to dual boot between Linux and BSD, but perhaps if you go look in FreeBSD, you shall find similar guide as well. BSD is certainly a lot nicer and better than Linux mainly because it gives you more power to decide what to install, and what to not install. It only installs the base system, and shall only takes about 30 min or so to install. The rest is all about the ports system. You have to compile your favorite GUI shell from ground up, such as KDE or Gnome or ICE. It sounds complicated, but it is quite simple. You just need to choose the package and issue the command, and then you just need to hold back .. get a cup of coffee..and BSD does the rest. BSD is quite well documented, and supports a lot of x86 hardware as well. I can't really say that all Linux applications run on BSD. The ports system means that once the code is done in Linux/Solaris/UNIX, it sould be easy to port it to BSD. But it all takes time. As far as I know, FreeBSD supports most application you see on Linux platform, but that's not that case with OpenBSD. ThunderRiver

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Well sonic dragon;first of all i would say if u want to realy try linux your prayers have just being answeredtheir is distro which run totally of the cd-rom and nothing ever gets installed on your drive.i think its knoppix...... :blink:, which could really help u try out the stuffs their......such is recommended for personal use, but for production ya business ventures better call Hp as they are currently the one stop shop for linux needs,any where in this world wide...... B)

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You have to compile your favorite GUI shell from ground up, such as KDE or Gnome or ICE. It sounds complicated, but it is quite simple. You just need to choose the package and issue the command, and then you just need to hold back .. get a cup of coffee..and BSD does the rest.
Thats not 100% correct - you don't *have* to compile everything with the ports. FreeBSD offers binary packages as well. To, say, install XFree via the packages, all you need to do is issue the command "pkg_add -r XFree86", and after 1 or 2 minutes (more if you're on 56k) the thing should be installed.Compiling stuff from the ports is great because it allows you to set compile time options or use optimizations, however for things like openoffice it's just masochist ;)
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Sonic Dragon...As far as reinstalling WinXP with an 'upgrade' disk, you don't have to install WinME first. XP will ask to put the CD from your previous copy of Windows to verify that you qualify to use the upgrade version. HTHB ;)

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Guest ThunderRiver
You have to compile your favorite GUI shell from ground up, such as KDE or Gnome or ICE. It sounds complicated, but it is quite simple. You just need to choose the package and issue the command, and then you just need to hold back .. get a cup of coffee..and BSD does the rest.
Thats not 100% correct - you don't *have* to compile everything with the ports. FreeBSD offers binary packages as well. To, say, install XFree via the packages, all you need to do is issue the command "pkg_add -r XFree86", and after 1 or 2 minutes (more if you're on 56k) the thing should be installed.Compiling stuff from the ports is great because it allows you to set compile time options or use optimizations, however for things like openoffice it's just masochist ;)
As far as I know, there is no binary build for OpenBSD though..
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