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Another hard drive question


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#51 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 05:00 PM

Dale,1) You really did nothing by installing Debian's GRUB on the MBR of sdb because sdb is NOT your 1st boot device. 2) sda is your 1st boot device. It looks like PClinuxOS controls the GRUB & MBR on that drive.3) You need to determine the info that I posted about above regarding Debian's kernel and initrd and then edit the PClinuxOS menu.lst above to add an entry for Debian.

#52 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 07:02 PM

[root@localhost dale]# ls /mnt/bootconfig-2.6.32-5-amd64  initrd.img-2.6.32-5-amd64  vmlinuz-2.6.32-5-amd64grub/                  System.map-2.6.32-5-amd64and that is all there is there .
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#53 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 07:12 PM

Going back to item 8 of your post where you have Debian at (hd1,0) is where I have problems since prior to this adventure, when (hd1,0) was on what is now (hd2,0) it had/has Windows 7 there. So I am guessing that when I make the new (hd1,0) Debian, I shall have to change WIndows 7 entry to read (hd2,) ,,, correct ???
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#54 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 10:21 PM

The info you need to create the Debian entry in your menu.lst is the "vmlinuz-2.6.32-5-amd64" and the "initrd.img-2.6.32-5-amd64".
 # Debiantitle		  Debianroot		 (hd1,0)kernel	 /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-5-amd64 root=/dev/sdb1initrd	   /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-5-amd64
To confirm that your drives are (hd0) = /dev/sda, (hd1) = /dev/sdb, (hd2) = /dev/sdc you'll need to check the drive geometry from within the GRUB menu command line. Reboot your machine, during the menu page, click the "c" key on your keyboard. You will be shown and GRUB prompt that looks like this:
grub>
At that prompt type:
grub> geometry (hd0)
Write down the info you get. Repeat that command for the other two drives:
grub> geometry (hd1)grub> geometry (hd2)
If the answers are:/dev/sda = (hd0)/dev/sdb = (hd1)/dev/sdc = (hd2)you're all set. You're Debian is on (hd1,0) --> /dev/sdb1 --> 2nd drive/1st partition. That entry that I have above in menu.lst should boot Debian.If the above geometries are not what I have listed, then we post here what they are on your system so we can figure this out.Don't worry about Windows for the moment. Let's try to get your Debian to boot.

#55 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 10:26 PM

Also, Dale...GRUB does NOT count drives and partitions from 1 to whatever. GRUB starts at ZERO. This means that drive 1 is drive 0 to GRUB. Drive 2 is drive 1 to GRUB, and so on... Partitions also start at 0 in GRUB, so the 1st partition is 0 in GRUB.Your Windows is on your 1st drive/1st partition --> /dev/sda1 --> (hd0,0) to GRUB. Your Debian is on your 2nd drive/1st partition --> /dev/sdb1 --> (hd1,0) to GRUB.See how that works? Nothing changed for you Windows. It should still boot fine using that menu.lst entry you already have for it. :hysterical:

#56 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 11:48 AM

Okay,, now to start the fun,,, also Windows XP is not the Windows that I am concerned about. It is Windows 7 that is going to be "somewhere in the ether" after this.
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#57 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 12:46 PM

Here are the results (I would venture to say, not to good)Drive 0x80Partition num0 filesystem unk part 0x7Partition num1 filesystem fatPartition num4 filesystem ext2fs 0x83Partition num5 filesystem unk 0x82Partition num6 filesystem ext2fs 0x83Partition num7 filesystem ext2fs 0x83Drive 0x81Partition num0 filesystem unk 0x7Partition num1 filesystem unk 0x7Drive 0x82Partition num0 filesystem ext2fs 0x83
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#58 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 05:19 PM

That's interesting. GRUB doesn't even recognize the partitions on some of your drives. Here's what you fdisk -l looked like:
Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x80778077Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System/dev/sda1 * 517 13264 102398310 7 HPFS/NTFS/dev/sda2 1 516 4144738+ b W95 FAT32/dev/sda3 13265 47682 276462554+ 5 Extended/dev/sda5 13265 26012 102398278+ 83 Linux/dev/sda6 26013 27286 10233373+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris/dev/sda7 27287 37484 81915403+ 83 Linux/dev/sda8 37485 47682 81915403+ 83 LinuxPartition table entries are not in disk orderDisk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x000d64e0Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System/dev/sdb1 * 1 121602 976760832 83 Linux/dev/sdb2 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb3 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb4 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 4 does not end on cylinder boundary.Disk /dev/sdc: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x7ccb63d6Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System/dev/sdc1 * 1 13 102400 7 HPFS/NTFSPartition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdc2 13 12749 102297600 7 HPFS/NTFSPartition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.
Your GRUB geometry is just FUNKY! This calls for some assistance from someone with more smarts than me, Dale. Sorry. :(Just out of curiosity... what did you use to partition/format that new 1T drive?

#59 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 05:25 PM

I see it now...Drive 0x80 >THIS IS YOUR /DEV/SDA DRIVE<Partition num0 filesystem unk part 0x7 <-- Windows XPPartition num1 filesystem fatPartition num4 filesystem ext2fs 0x83Partition num5 filesystem unk 0x82Partition num6 filesystem ext2fs 0x83Partition num7 filesystem ext2fs 0x83Drive 0x81 >THIS IS YOUR /DEV/SDC DRIVE<Partition num0 filesystem unk 0x7 <-- Win 7Partition num1 filesystem unk 0x7Drive 0x82 >THIS IS YOU NEW 1T /DEV/SDB DRIVE<Partition num0 filesystem ext2fs 0x83 <-- partitions not recognized correctly by GRUB :(Since they are out of order, GRUB is going to see your /dev/sdb as (hd2) instead of (hd1) like it should be. This is exactly the issue I'm having in Arch with GRUB right now on my system. ;)

#60 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 05:39 PM

Gee.... I am so confused when all I really wanted to do in the beginning is load Debian on the new drive, wipe hda/sda slick except for the Win XP. Would this make this easier, burn to disk the .thunderbird folder from PCLOS and burn the "bookmarks" that I already exported to the documents folder, wipe the hda/sda like I just mentioned and install Debian there ,,, or am I going to cause more headaches than I already have ???
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#61 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 05:42 PM

As far as the partitioning on the 1TB drive all I did is when the step came up asking where I wanted to install Debian I selected the entry SCSI4. created the one and only partition for the time being, formatted it and installed Debian there.
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#62 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 05:54 PM

Your /dev/sda nor you /dev/sdc are the issues here, Dale. It's that new 1T drive. It's strange. It shows multiple partitions yet GRUB doesn't understand what they are. Also, even fdisk is giving strange info for that drive:Partition table entries are not in disk orderDisk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x000d64e0Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System/dev/sdb1 * 1 121602 976760832 83 Linux/dev/sdb2 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb3 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb4 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 4 does not end on cylinder boundary.* = boot flagsStrange. ;) We need an expert here. I don't think you should use the BIG Hammer method on your /dev/sda or /dev/sdc drives. There's nothing wrong there. You just need, I think, to properly setup up, partition, and format that 1T drive. Gparted might work or some other partitioning utility, maybe?

#63 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 05:59 PM

Oh,,, as you have shown the 1TB drive is what is giving me fits, first off there is only on partition on it, so where it is getting the partitions 2,3 and 4 from are anyones guess, and the "does not end on a cylinder" error/warning is new to me also. I can only come up with that since it lists 4 partitions it must have something to do with the standard of only 4 primary partitions on a disk. I shall tinker some more and see what else I can cause to happen.
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#64 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 06:31 PM

Well, have FUN, Dale. It's instances like this one that I really wish you lived down the block. It would be EVER SO MUCH easier to troubleshoot in person. :yes:Luck!

#65 OFFLINE   amenditman

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 08:34 PM

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on Apr 25 2011, 06:31 PM, said:

Well, have FUN, Dale. It's instances like this one that I really wish you lived down the block. It would be EVER SO MUCH easier to troubleshoot in person. :yes:Luck!
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#66 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:07 PM

TSA can grep THIS! ;)

#67 OFFLINE   mlangdn

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:20 PM

I have never installed Debian, but i did have this same problem installing Suse once before. I gave Suse the partition to install to, but it screwed it up royally. Partitions were changed and did not end on boundaries. I had to boot with a Slackware disk, and usinf fdisk, reset the boundaries to there original points. I saved my Windows install by knowing where the original boundaries were. In this case, its a new drive with only Debian installed. However, I use lilo and know literally nothing about grub. I would use the BIG Hammer on that 1TB drive and partition the thing manually using fdisk or cfdisk from a Slackware install disk if you have one. I just don't trust any longer any distro that partitons from the installer. Past headaches still hurt.When you are done with fdisk, it is able to show you what will be written to the table before you commit. You can make both Windows and Linux partitions if you like. When done, install Debian again using the partition of choice.

#68 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 01:03 PM

Good advice, Michael. That's probably the route I would take here, too.

#69 OFFLINE   burninbush

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 02:22 PM

The way to fix this is to wipe any existing partition table on the 1 tb drive, and do it over.  Something failed with the original auto-install distro.  So boot to some other linux on the same machine, become root, and do a #fdisk -l command, which will show the /dev/sdb name of the device -- as that machine's bootup routines found it.  We must be certain not to clear the wrong drive.  Let's say you decide it's /dev/sdb.  Ignore any further partitions or error messages regarding /dev/sdb.  #dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=512 count=1 that will overwrite the first sector of the sdb drive with all zeros, and any partition tool will then see the drive as unpartitioned.   Then ... #cfdisk /dev/sdband create some new partitions, in a sensible way, and when you have it as you like it =with no empty holes of unpartitioned regions= then choose the Write option to formally write the new partition table to the drive.  Then reboot, and run #fdisk -l again, this time the new drive's partitions should appear.  However, BE AWARE that grub will also now see the new drive, and this may disturb the naming on your previous drives -- i.e., if the new drive is seen by your bios as appearing in front of, or between the two drives you already had.  Depending on where the stage2 parts of your current grub install live, chances are non-zero that the computer will no longer boot.  This is where you need a 'plan B', usually a livecd that you know is reliable.  That would allow you to edit the menu.lst, or to reinstall grub, or to run grub in command mode [grub>...] to diagnose your machine.       One way to get those "partition not ending on ... boundary" messages is to partition a disk with windows -- and then list partition info with linux.  They use different rules about where partitions may start or end, though it isn't usually fatal either way.  My choice here is to always partition with linux -- works so far.  Grub isn't currently acknowledging the drive is there because it appears unpartitioned.  I'll just add -- starting over from scratch, this is the optimum time to create a tiny [2gb] first partition on that new drive, and install grub to it -- and plan on always keeping at least that first partition the same if/when you decide to change the rest of it.

#70 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 02:46 PM

:happyroll: :happyroll: :happyroll: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :w00t: :) :o      WELL ,,,, by golly, I do believe I am 95 pct. good-to-go... this is what I have done so far.   On the 1TB disk wiped the Debian install off (it was very bad BTW), left it plugged in (pwr & data cables), did a fresh install of Debian on it, everything is good. Before I did this fresh install I unplugged the data cables on both the already installed hard drives (hda/sda and hdb/sdb) so that I would not have any confusion within. When the step came up as to what to do with the bootloader I let it install it to the MBR. I did a reboot to check on it, Debian booted up just fine, no hits, no runs, no errors (I must mention that during this the 1TB drive displayed as SDA). Okay, so far, so good, be bold, I also installed on the same drive(on partition (hd2,1) the latest version of Sabayon, it also went on fine and boots up (very slow however). Now comes the real test, shut down pwr to the computer, plugged the other two hard drives back in and moved the data cable for the 1TB drive to a different SATA port, think it is now in SATA5 port. At the moment, all three drives read and are listed correctly, the 1TB drive has not hi-jacked the SDB position. Setting up the bootloader is another story altogether, I made entries in 3 different OS's for this, one each in the two PCLOS installs, and one in the Mandriva install. There is a reason for that, I have mentioned that the Mandriva install is where the MBR is located, BUT, I have selected the PCLOS install as the default boot OS. I have to further research this one item but in the current PCLOS bootloader menu that I am using now as well as the other PCLOS and Mandriva the Debian install will not boot, however, if I select the Sabayon entry it brings up a grub bootloader that shows Debian and Sabayon, select Debian and it works fine. One more item the entries I made in the grub menu are as follows:title Debianroot (hd2,0)chainloader +1title Sabayonroot (hd2,1)chainloader +1
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#71 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 06:29 PM

Update .... made new entry for the Debian install as follows:title   Debianroot   (hd2,0)kernel  /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-5-amd64 root=/dev/sdc1initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-5-amd64this entry works in both the PCLOS installs, boots into Debian (after a long POST) and works fine. For some reason though it does not work on the Mandriva install, which, is not an issue. So bottom line (I think) is that the Debian install works, the hard disks appear in the correct order and show the proper info on each one.Thanks to all for the help (and for putting up with me) ...
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#72 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 07:05 PM

You are my sunshine, my only sunshineYou make me happy when skies are gray...:w00t:Give 'em ****, Dale. :yes:

#73 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 08:27 PM

Where is that darn bucket at ?????
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#74 OFFLINE   vonbiber

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 12:21 PM

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on Apr 25 2011, 11:54 PM, said:

Partition table entries are not in disk orderDisk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x000d64e0Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System/dev/sdb1 * 1 121602 976760832 83 Linux/dev/sdb2 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb3 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb4 * 1 1 0 0 EmptyPartition 4 does not end on cylinder boundary.* = boot flagsStrange. :yes: We need an expert here.
I'd personally use fdisk on /dev/sdb
# fdisk /dev/sdb
then delete all the partitions
d
starting by the last one (4) when prompted for the partition number up to the firstThen create new partitions
n
n is for 'new'If you create no more than 4, you can create 4 primary partitionsIf you intend to have more than 4, then create 3 primary partitionsand a 4th extended partition on which you add the other partitionsIn the first case the partitions will be named
/dev/sdb1 /dev/sdb2 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdb4
in the latter case
/dev/sdb1 /dev/sdb2 /dev/sdb3/dev/sdb5 /dev/sdb6 ...
The useful commands to know
m
for help
p
to display the current partitions on the deviceI've never used gparted except for resizing and moving partitions around.But you can try it. It has a graphical interface.You can use it from a live linux system such pmagichttp://partedmagic.com/doku.phpdownload the iso (it's zipped, current version is 6.0)If you don't want to burn it to a cd-rom, you can extract the files from the isoand copy them to a usb stick and make the stick bootable.I can give you more details about that if you're interested

Edited by vonbiber, 27 April 2011 - 12:26 PM.


#75 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 12:40 PM

I agree, Von... fdisk would have been the way to go. :yes:




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