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Another hard drive question


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#26 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 08:16 PM

Sure. I can choose the boot order of devices in my BIOS. Currently my boot order is my sda drive 1st and my HP DVD-RW second. There are 4 or 5 other slots. I have them deactivated. That has ABSOLUTELY no connection to how the operating systems (or the bootloaders) see the device numbers. I can put my sdb drive in the first slot in the boot order and everything still see it as sdb. If this is what you're talking about, Lew...Posted Imageit does not have any affect at all on how my system sees the drives. It just tells the BIOS to look on the 1st one for an MBR with a bootloader. If there isn't one on the 1st one, then it goes to the 2nd, and so on. That's all that does.Now, if you're talking about the standard cmos settings page, like this one...Posted ImageI have that too, but I cannot "move" drives around to the order I want them in there. There is no option for that. I can change their physical plug-in location on the EIDE or SATA buss on the mobo, though. That DOES change them from sdx to sdy to sdz, etc (x,y,z = variables).Anywho... I wish my BIOS could magically do what you're implying. I think that would solve my Arch GRUB issue. :hysterical:
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#27 OFFLINE   lewmur

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 08:22 PM

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on Apr 21 2011, 07:16 PM, said:

Sure. I can choose the boot order of devices in my BIOS. Currently my boot order is my sda drive 1st and my HP DVD-RW second. There are 4 or 5 other slots. I have them deactivated. That has ABSOLUTELY no connection to how the operating systems (or the bootloaders) see the device numbers. I can put my sdb drive in the first slot in the boot order and everything still see it as sdb. If this is what you're talking about, Lew...Posted Imageit does not have any affect at all on how my system sees the drives. It just tells the BIOS to look on the 1st one for an MBR with a bootloader. If there isn't one on the 1st one, then it goes to the second. That's all that does.Now, if you're talking about the standard cmos settings page, like this one...Posted ImageI have that too, but I can "move" drives around to the order I want them in there. There is no option for that. I can change their physical plug-in location on the EIDE or SATA buss on the mobo, though. That DOES change them from sdx to sdy to sdz, etc (x,y,z = variables).Anywho... I wish my BIOS could magically do what you're implying. I think that would solve my Arch GRUB issue. :hysterical:
On the first screen you show, there is an option that says "Hard Disk Boot Priority".  Highlight that and press "Enter".  It will bring up another window with the list of your hard disks.  That is where you can change their order.

#28 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 08:31 PM

I'm going to reboot right now and check that, Lew. If you're right, I'll virtually kiss your arse right here at Scots.Stay tuned, folks... :hysterical:
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#29 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 08:40 PM

Well, unfortunately, the AMI BIOS on this brand new MSI mobo does not have that option. Neither did my ericsbane03-04 Gigabyte mobo w/ Award BIOS. No arse kissy for you, Lew. ;)Thanks for trying to help, though. :hysterical:
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#30 OFFLINE   lewmur

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 08:43 PM

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on Apr 21 2011, 07:40 PM, said:

Well, unfortunately, the AMI BIOS on this brand new MSI mobo does not have that option. Neither did my ericsbane03-04 Gigabyte mobo w/ Award BIOS. No arse kissy for you, Lew. ;)Thanks for trying to help, though. ;)
That option is in the picture you posted.  It is right there staring you in the face.  Use it!! :hysterical:  And the picture was of a Phoenix BIOS.edit: It is the second option on the page.  Right under CPU Features.

Edited by lewmur, 21 April 2011 - 08:56 PM.


#31 OFFLINE   amenditman

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 09:34 PM

I have the same options.My HDDs, 1 - SATA 500 GB labelled PM, 1- SATA 500 GB labelled SM, and one Corsair 60 GB SSD.I shuffled them around and there was no change to the drive letters assigned to them by linux.Shuffled them back and no change.Sorry Lewmur, same result as Eric.

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#32 OFFLINE   lewmur

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 09:42 PM

View Postamenditman, on Apr 21 2011, 08:34 PM, said:

I have the same options.My HDDs, 1 - SATA 500 GB labelled PM, 1- SATA 500 GB labelled SM, and one Corsair 60 GB SSD.I shuffled them around and there was no change to the drive letters assigned to them by linux.Shuffled them back and no change.Sorry Lewmur, same result as Eric.
Sorry but it's not the same result.  He claims he doesn't have the ability to "shuffle" them.  Your result may simply be because your Linux is using the UUID instead of the hd numbering.  Or the fact that you aren't "shuffling" them using the option I'm talking about.  The PM, SM and SSD designation certainly don't match that option.  The Hard Disk Priority will list the drives by their manufacturer's model number.  (Which makes it difficult when you have more than one drive of the same model.)

Edited by lewmur, 21 April 2011 - 09:59 PM.


#33 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 11:46 PM

BIOSes boots only the first disk (by default, determined by physical location). They also allow users to determine what should be the first disk (the HD boot priority feature). This info is passed on to the operating systems. How operating systems IDs and handles the disks vary. For Dale's problem, we should be looking at the bootloader and the fstab/udev files.

#34 OFFLINE   lewmur

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 01:26 AM

View Postb2cm, on Apr 21 2011, 10:46 PM, said:

BIOSes boots only the first disk (by default, determined by physical location). They also allow users to determine what should be the first disk (the HD boot priority feature). This info is passed on to the operating systems. How operating systems IDs and handles the disks vary. For Dale's problem, we should be looking at the bootloader and the fstab/udev files.
Which drive's MBR is called is definitely a function of the BIOS.  And while it is true that the OS that gets booted can override the order of the drives, when grub is first executed, that order is determined by the "Hard Drive Priority" function of the BIOS.  In Linux, the /etc/fstab file can use either the UUID numbers or the /dev/sd@# to mount the drives.  But, say you open gparted and look at the drives.  Which one is sda, sdb, sdc etc, should still follow the order set in the "Hard Drive Priority" function of the BIOS.  Of course, unless it is manually changed, that should follow the physical ports the drives are plugged into.  However, I don't know that there is a hard convention of the order of the physical ports when you have a mixture of SATA, IDE and USB drives.  Particularly when external drives may or may not be plugged in each time you boot.  Thus the current trend toward using the UUIDs.

#35 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 08:49 AM

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when grub is first executed, that order is determined by the "Hard Drive Priority" function of the BIOS
That's correct. Grub creates the device map file that translates BIOS drives to operating system devices. If you later change the hard drive priority, mapping errors can happen. Also, the kernel and driver subsystem can also change the device mapping.

#36 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 12:15 PM

Lew, those were just sample photos. They weren't of my actual BIOS screens. :thumbsup:
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#37 OFFLINE   lewmur

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 01:22 PM

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on Apr 22 2011, 11:15 AM, said:

Lew, those were just sample photos. They weren't of my actual BIOS screens. :)
Whatever they are, they disprove your contention that the feature either doesn't exist or is rare.  The one picture you happen to come up with, does have the feature.  I can post pictures of a both AMI desktop BIOS screens I have on hand and the feature exist in both.edit: But first you have to tell me how to post pictures in this forum.  :thumbsup:

Edited by lewmur, 22 April 2011 - 01:25 PM.


#38 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 02:54 PM

Very informative info here.... so this is what I think I am getting here,, under the listing of "Boot" I have a listing for hard drive order, under that listing I can move the order around as to which hard drive I can have as SATA 1, SATA 2, and SATA 3 or am I totally way out in the boonies on that ???
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#39 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 07:12 PM

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edit: But first you have to tell me how to post pictures in this forum.
Go here: http://www.freeimagehosting.net/Click 'Choose file' button, browse to your image and select. Click 'Upload image' button. After the upload, copy the hosted image url with the IMG tags. For example:
[img]http://www.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/25e85e21f8.png[/img]
and the image will show up like this:Posted Image

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I have a listing for hard drive order, under that listing I can move the order around as to which hard drive I can have as SATA 1, SATA 2, and SATA 3
Yes, as far as the BIOS is concerned. But that info is the one that the OS sees.

Edited by b2cm, 22 April 2011 - 07:25 PM.


#40 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 12:15 PM

So far, after some minor changes in the "hard drive" order, I have found out that I can move the 3 installed hard drives around and that whichever one I put in as SATA1 is the one that will get booted into. I did not yet see if by doing that it changes what I see when I click on the "configure your computer" icon. However, even though this is all good for me it still does not tell me how to add the new hard drive to the grub menu.
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#41 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 12:25 PM

You don't add "drives" to the GRUB, Dale. You add the partitions that have the operating systems on them to GRUB. Let's review...What are you trying to do here, specifically?
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#42 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 07:17 PM

Right, wording error there. I did have Debian installed on the new hard disk in the first partition. During the install when it came to the partition where it asks where I want to put it, the new hard disk appeared as SCSI5 (now why that appeared that way I have no idea). Since there were no partitions on it I made the first one. Now when I came to the step where it asks about installing grub to the MBR,  I selected no since I wanted to install it to the partition that I had just created (I am getting tired of messing up my grub boot loader). In my way of thinking the new drive should have been SDC or possibly appear as SD2. I tried using (in grub) to install this boot loader to (hd2,0) but it would not go, I got errors that I could not install to that selection. I have since removed the Debian install but I am going to try it again.
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#43 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 11:45 PM

OK, here we go...1) You don't need to install a bootloader anywhere if you already have an active bootloader on the MBR of your normally booted 1st drive.2) When you install a new distro on some partitions somewhere, just skip the bootloader installation, if it will give you that option (Debian does).3) Once you have installed your new distro, boot your main distribution.4) From the command line, use the fdisk command to make sure you have the proper names or drives (sda, sdb, sdc, etc.) and the proper numbers for the partitions.
 # fdisk -l
Here's what my fdisk -l looks like with three drives:
root_Slackware/home/vtel57:# fdisk -lDisk /dev/sdb: 250.0 GB, 250000000000 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30394 cylinders, total 488281250 sectorsUnits = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x0009e140   Device Boot	  Start		 End	  Blocks   Id  System/dev/sdb1   *	   16384	51216383	25600000	7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT/dev/sdb2		51232768   102432767	25600000	7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT/dev/sdb3	   102453181   488270159   192908489+   5  Extended/dev/sdb5	   102453183   106550639	 2048728+  82  Linux swap/dev/sdb6	   106565823   137289599	15361888+  83  Linux/dev/sdb7	   137304783   188501039	25598128+  83  Linux/dev/sdb8	   188516223   219239999	15361888+  83  Linux/dev/sdb9	   219255183   270451439	25598128+  83  Linux/dev/sdb10	  270466623   301190399	15361888+  83  Linux/dev/sdb11	  301205583   352401839	25598128+  83  Linux/dev/sdb12	  352417023   383140799	15361888+  83  Linux/dev/sdb13	  383155983   434352239	25598128+  83  Linux/dev/sdb14	  434367423   488270159	26951368+  83  LinuxDisk /dev/sdc: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectorsUnits = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x0002cd1d   Device Boot	  Start		 End	  Blocks   Id  System/dev/sdc1		   16065   102414374	51199155   83  Linux/dev/sdc2	   102430440   204828749	51199155   83  Linux/dev/sdc3	   204844815   488392064   141773625	5  Extended/dev/sdc5	   204860880   307259189	51199155	b  W95 FAT32/dev/sdc6	   307275318   409673564	51199123+  83  Linux/dev/sdc7	   409689693   488392064	39351186	b  W95 FAT32Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250058268160 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488395055 sectorsUnits = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x24812481   Device Boot	  Start		 End	  Blocks   Id  System/dev/sda1   *	   16065	51215219	25599577+  83  Linux/dev/sda2		51247350   153645659	51199155   83  Linux/dev/sda3	   153661725   488392064   167365170	5  Extended/dev/sda5	   153661788   204860879	25599546   83  Linux/dev/sda6	   204877008   307275254	51199123+  83  Linux/dev/sda7	   307307448   311403959	 2048256   82  Linux swap/dev/sda8	   311420088   488392064	88485988+  83  Linux
Yours will be different, of course, but similar. Notice the device names and the partition numbers listed there? /dev/sda1 = 1st drive, 1st partition, and so on. 5) Determine which drive and partition you installed the /(root) for your new distro. You say that your new Debian is on the first partition of the second drive on your system. IMPORTANT: YOU NEED TO CONFIRM THIS WITH FDISK ABOVE. OK, that would make the device and partition identification --> /dev/sdb1.Now's where it gets interesting...6) Mount your Debian partition from within your main distribution:
 # mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt
7) List the items in the Debian /boot directory:
 # ls /mnt/boot
It should look something like this:
vtel57_Slackware~:$ ls /bootREADME.initrd			 config			  initrd.gzSystem.map			 config-generic-2.6.37.6  vmlinuzSystem.map-generic-2.6.37.6  config-huge-2.6.37.6	 vmlinuz-generic-2.6.37.6System.map-huge-2.6.37.6	 initrd-tree		  vmlinuz-huge-2.6.37.6
But not quite, because the example above is from my Slackware installation. Debian's will be a bit different. Make a note of the vmlinuz-... and the initrd... items. You need that info to edit your menu.lst in your main distribution to boot Debian.If you're running GRUB legacy (not the newer GRUB2), you need to edit the /boot/grub/menu.lst file to tell GRUB where you new Debian is and how to boot it. If you're running GRUB2, you're screwed because I know next-to-diddly about it. :hysterical:8) Edit menu.lst to add this entry for your Debian:
# Debian title	 Debianroot	 (hd1,0)kernel /boot/vmlinuz-...<enter Debian info from /boot> root=/dev/sdb1 roinitrd   /boot/initrd-...<enter Debian initrd info from /boot>.img
9) Save your menu.lst.10) Reboot and choose the new Debian entry in your GRUB menu when it pops up.Have fun! :)By the way, you probably noticed that the root entry in the Debian entry above in the menu.lst is "(hd1,0)". You might be thinking that's wrong for your 2nd drive/1st partition identification in GRUB. Well, GRUB maps differently. Here's how GRUB sees drives:/dev/sda = (hd0)/dev/sdb = (hd1)/dev/sdc = (hd2)and so on...For partitions, GRUB starts the numbering at 0 also., so the 2nd drive/1st partition for your Debian is see by GRUB as (hd1,0). Clear as that 6 month old oil you just drained out of your truck, huh? :hysterical:
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#44 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 03:55 AM

Quote

So far, after some minor changes in the "hard drive" order, I have found out that I can move the 3 installed hard drives around and that whichever one I put in as SATA1 is the one that will get booted into.
Not only does it let you select which disk to boot, it also allows you to set how Grub is supposed to number your disks. As Lew had already pointed out, and as this Suse documentation on Grub explains:

Quote

GRUB does not distinguish between IDE, SCSI, or RAID devices. All hard disks detected by the BIOS or other disk controllers are counted according to the boot sequence set in the BIOS itself.http://www.novell.co...ml/ch07s04.html

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I did not yet see if by doing that it changes what I see when I click on the "configure your computer" icon.
You can also check the 'device.map' file that Grub creates and maintains. If you see some errors, you can edit it.

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As the order of IDE, SCSI, and other hard disks depends on various factors and Linux is not able to identify the mapping, the sequence in the file device.map can be set manually. If you encounter problems when booting, check if the sequence in this file corresponds to the sequence in the BIOS and use the GRUB shell to modify it if necessary. Once you have successfully booted your Linux system, edit the file device.map permanently with the YaST boot loader module or an editor of your choice.Any manual change to the device.map file requires that you update your GRUB installation. Use the following command:  grub --batch --device-map=/boot/grub/device.map < /etc/grub.confhttp://www.novell.co...ml#sec:grub.map
As for:

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However, even though this is all good for me it still does not tell me how to add the new hard drive to the grub menu.
This is a different matter, and Eric's suggestion on how to add system partitions to your Grub menu is the way to go.I have a diffrent way of setting up multibooting. I keep my MBR standard and chainload from my XP partition.

#45 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:22 PM

A note: correcting the device.map file in the booting distribution will NOT change how the MBR GRUB sees the drives on the system. I'm having this issue myself right now. I can check GRUB geometry within Arch and get the correct device mapping, yet when I check GRUB geometry within the menu grub> command line, I get the incorrect device mapping that I'm having issues with. GRUB gets the geometry initially when it is installed. The stage1 file is created with that initial device mapping, so you can't always believe what the /boot/grub/device.map file says. The more accurate way to determine how the bootloader is actually seeing the drives is to drop down to a grub> command line once the menu appears at bootup by hitting the "c" key on your keyboard and then giving the following command:
grub> geometry (hd*)
This will show exactly how the actual bootloader is naming the drives on your system. Here's what mine looks like from within Arch:http://www.linuxques...16/#post4329997
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#46 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 02:05 PM

[root@localhost dale]# fdisk -lDisk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x80778077   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System/dev/sda1   *         517       13264   102398310    7  HPFS/NTFS/dev/sda2               1         516     4144738+   b  W95 FAT32/dev/sda3           13265       47682   276462554+   5  Extended/dev/sda5           13265       26012   102398278+  83  Linux/dev/sda6           26013       27286    10233373+  82  Linux swap / Solaris/dev/sda7           27287       37484    81915403+  83  Linux/dev/sda8           37485       47682    81915403+  83  LinuxPartition table entries are not in disk orderDisk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x000d64e0   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System/dev/sdb1   *           1      121602   976760832   83  Linux/dev/sdb2   *           1           1           0    0  EmptyPartition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb3   *           1           1           0    0  EmptyPartition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdb4   *           1           1           0    0  EmptyPartition 4 does not end on cylinder boundary.Disk /dev/sdc: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylindersUnits = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytesSector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytesI/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytesDisk identifier: 0x7ccb63d6   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System/dev/sdc1   *           1          13      102400    7  HPFS/NTFSPartition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary./dev/sdc2              13       12749   102297600    7  HPFS/NTFSPartition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.[I just finished the re-install of Debian on the 1.0 TB disk, which, as you see is listed as SDB. A couple of noteworthy items (sorry Eric, but I did this to see if it would work), when it came to the step to install the grub boot loader, I paid much closer attention to the details this time. Instead of trying to figure out how to install it to a partition I put it at (hd1) and surprisingly it must have done it since I did not get any "errors" returned. Now, here is my thought, since Mandriva is my actual MBR OS with PCLOS being the OS that is predominately used and default boot, that I would/should/maybe via consol make the necessary boot loader changes there to add the Debian install into it as (hd1,0). Would that be a yes or no?
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#47 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 02:23 PM

Quote

correcting the device.map file in the booting distribution will NOT change how the MBR GRUB sees the drives on the system. I'm having this issue myself right now
There are many variables involved in this problem that you need to cancel out one by one. First, there's the BIOS device enumeration (the BIOS variable). Second, there's the Grub device mapping (the Grub variable). Third, there's the kernel probing and driver subsystem (the Linux variable). And probably many other more. If you have cancelled out disk priority and editing the device map, the next step is for you to check out udev. As I suggested in an earlier post:

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This info is passed on to the operating systems. How operating systems IDs and handles the disks vary. For Dale's problem, we should be looking at the bootloader and the fstab/udev files.
In the link you provided, jeff_sadowski suspects:

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maybe it is a udev problem. look in /etc/udev/rules.d or where your udev rules are. it sounds like udev might have permanently mapped specific drives to specific sd[x] drives
Now that is a good lead.Anyway, my point is we are dealing with variables, or to put it in another way, the cause of the problem will vary from PC to PC (BIOS and device mix), from Grub version to another and how/ when Grub was installed, and from distro to distro. So, if in your case the problem was not solved by modifying the device priority or the device map file, that does not mean that these will also not work for others.

#48 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 03:06 PM

;) B)   Oh, okay, I guess. I still have to post the /boot/grub/menu.lst from the actual MBR OS. In that you will see that (hd1,0) is Win 7 (that is only OS on that drive). This is where I get more confused than I normally am. In the fdisk -l that I just posted it shows SDB as the 1.0 TB drive with SDC as a 500 GB drive, but in the menu.lst it shows SDB as the 500 GB drive that is shown in fdisk -l as SDC. If (big IF), I go into the menu.lst and make changes so that the Debian install which shows up on SDB and change the entries on what used to be SDB to read SDC will I be able to boot into them under their new designators or am I going to be up the creek without the canoe or paddle.
Dale

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#49 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 04:23 PM

Here is the /boot/grub/menu.lst from the MBR OStimeout 5color black/cyan yellow/cyangfxmenu (hd0,6)/boot/gfxmenudefault 0title PCLinuxOS (PCLinuxOS)root (hd0,4)configfile /boot/grub/menu.lsttitle linuxkernel (hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=linux root=UUID=338844ba-d916-482d-8992-0b1136d72773 resume=UUID=a1f143a8-2126-4229-8ed0-23b02edafa7d splash=silent vga=788initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.imgtitle linux-nonfbkernel (hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=linux-nonfb root=UUID=338844ba-d916-482d-8992-0b1136d72773 resume=UUID=a1f143a8-2126-4229-8ed0-23b02edafa7dinitrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.imgtitle failsafekernel (hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz BOOT_IMAGE=failsafe root=UUID=338844ba-d916-482d-8992-0b1136d72773 failsafeinitrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd.imgtitle windowsroot (hd0,0)makeactivechainloader +1title windows7root (hd1,0)map (hd0) (hd1)map (hd1) (hd0)makeactivechainloader +1title desktop586 2.6.33.5-2kernel (hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.33.5-desktop586-2mnb BOOT_IMAGE=desktop586_2.6.33.5-2 root=UUID=338844ba-d916-482d-8992-0b1136d72773 resume=UUID=a1f143a8-2126-4229-8ed0-23b02edafa7d splash=silent vga=788initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd-2.6.33.5-desktop586-2mnb.imgtitle desktop586 2.6.33.7-1kernel (hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.33.7-desktop586-1mnb BOOT_IMAGE=desktop586_2.6.33.7-1 root=UUID=338844ba-d916-482d-8992-0b1136d72773 resume=UUID=a1f143a8-2126-4229-8ed0-23b02edafa7d splash=silent vga=788initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd-2.6.33.7-desktop586-1mnb.imgtitle desktop586 2.6.33.7-2kernel (hd0,6)/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.33.7-desktop586-2mnb BOOT_IMAGE=desktop586_2.6.33.7-2 root=UUID=338844ba-d916-482d-8992-0b1136d72773 resume=UUID=a1f143a8-2126-4229-8ed0-23b02edafa7d splash=silent vga=788initrd (hd0,6)/boot/initrd-2.6.33.7-desktop586-2mnb.img
Dale

U.S. Navy (ret.) '62 - '84
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Reg. Linux User 412421

#50 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 04:54 PM

We are talking my issues and Dale's issues on this same thread. I didn't mean to hijack Dale's thread. I just wanted to point out some things to him using my issue as an example. I'd like to say one more thing about my issue though, b2cm... it cannot be a udev issue because the issue occurs during the BIOS-bootloader interaction. No operating system nor any udev has been initiated at that point. Anyway, lets' just drop my issue (or continue with it on the thread I have here in BATL) and get back to Dale's stuff...
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