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george orwell 1984, or ray bradbury fahrenheit 451


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securitybreach

wow! quite the list!

i read ender's game a few years back, animal farm & lord of the flies in highschool... brave new world, the foundation trilogy (with the mule, as i recall...)

 

i guess i could read all those and may be not done by year's end... :o

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165911_v1.jpg

 

I don't know if this is true.

 

I believe everything I read on the internet, especially stuff in parody blogs.

 

I know that he wrote a lot.

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Guest LilBambi

Asimov was one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards.

 

His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.

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abarbarian

wow! quite the list!

i read ender's game a few years back, animal farm & lord of the flies in highschool... brave new world, the foundation trilogy (with the mule, as i recall...)

 

i guess i could read all those and may be not done by year's end... :o

 

I f you try reading all them books one after the other you will certainly not read them all by the end of the year. You will have topped yourself long before years end :whistling:

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Guest LilBambi

This was interesting in Wikipedia:

 

 

Writer's dismissal

 

In 1985, Burgess published Flame into Being: The Life and Work of D. H. Lawrence, and while discussing Lady Chatterley's Lover in his biography, Burgess compared that novel's notoriety with A Clockwork Orange: "We all suffer from the popular desire to make the known notorious. The book I am best known for, or only known for, is a novel I am prepared to repudiate: written a quarter of a century ago, a jeu d'espritknocked off for money in three weeks, it became known as the raw material for a film which seemed to glorify sex and violence. The film made it easy for readers of the book to misunderstand what it was about, and the misunderstanding will pursue me until I die. I should not have written the book because of this danger of misinterpretation, and the same may be said of Lawrence and Lady Chatterley's Lover." Burgess also dismissed A Clockwork Orange as "too didactic to be artistic".

 

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More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon - one of my all time favourites.

 

Don't read any reviews or plot summaries. I looked at a few and there are too many spoilers.

From SFSite -

A review by Victoria Strauss

One of the key figures of science fiction's so-called Golden Age, Theodore Sturgeon stands out from his contemporaries both in the literary quality of his writing and his focus on creating strong, complex characters as well as fast-paced plots. He has been an influence on writers as diverse as Samuel Delany and Ray Bradbury, and serves as a continuing source of inspiration to SF's younger generation. His work fell out of print following his death in 1985, but recent years have seen complete reissues of his short story collections, and a number of reprintings of his novels -- including this one, from Millennium's SF Masterworks series.

Sturgeon is best-known as a short story writer, and More than Human is definitely a story writer's novel. It's constructed as three separate novelettes (the central one, "Baby is Three," was originally published in Galaxy) which together link up to tell a larger tale. This structure echoes the novel's theme: the creation and evolution of a Gestalt, a single being composed of disparate parts that are incomplete alone but together form a whole.

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V.T. Eric Layton

More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon - one of my all time favourites.

 

 

 

Yes. Good book! I actually read it and other Sturgeon stuff at your recommendation. Thanks! :)

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abarbarian

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gormenghast_%28series%29

 

Gormenghast is a remote and reclusive earldom dominated by the huge Castle Gormenghast at its centre, and ruled by the noble family of Groan since time immemorial. The kingdom derives its name from Gormenghast Mountain, and is isolated from the outside world by inhospitable regions on each side of it. To the North are marshy wastelands, to the South are salt grey marshes (and presumably then the ocean), to the East are quicksands and the tideless sea, and to the West are knuckles of endless rock.[2] To the West also lies the claw-like Gormenghast Mountain, with the Twisted Woods and Gormenghast river at its foot. East of them are escarpments described as "an irregular tableland of greeny-black rock, broken and scarred and empty", then desolate swamp before the vicinity of the castle is reached.[3]

 

The beeb did a tv and radio adaptation which are both great. Great story for reading on a dark and stormy night. B)

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abarbarian

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolai_Gogol

 

Gogol was one of the first masters of the short story, alongside Alexander Pushkin, Prosper Mérimée, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Edgar Allan Poe, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. He was in touch with the "literary aristocracy", had a story published in Anton Delvig's Northern Flowers, was taken up by Vasily Zhukovsky and Pyotr Pletnyov, and (in 1831) was introduced to Pushkin.

 

Diary of a Madman (1835; Russian: Записки сумасшедшего, Zapiski sumasshedshevo) is a farcical short story by Nikolai Gogol. Along with The Overcoat and The Nose, Diary of a Madman is considered to be one of Gogol's greatest short stories. The tale centers on the life of a minor civil servant during the repressive era of Nicholas I. Following the format of a diary, the story shows the descent of the protagonist, Poprishchin, into insanity. Diary of a Madman, the only one of Gogol's works written in first person, follows diary-entry format.

 

Diary of a Madman centers on the life of Poprishchin, a low-ranking civil servant and titular counsellor who yearns to be noticed by a beautiful woman, the daughter of a senior official, with whom he has fallen in love. His diary records his gradual slide into insanity.

 

Dead Souls is one of his best books and well worth a read. B)

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abarbarian

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Bulgakov

 

In the mid-1920s, he came to admire the works of H. G. Wells and wrote several stories with elements of science fiction, notably The Fatal Eggs (Роковые яйца) (1924) and Heart of a Dog (Собачье сердце) (1925).

 

Heart of a Dog features a professor who implants human testicles and a pituitary gland into a dog named Sharik (means "Little Balloon" or "Little Ball" - a popular Russian nickname for a male dog). The dog becomes more and more human as time passes, resulting in all manner of chaos. The tale can be read as a critical satire of liberal nihilsm and the communist mentality. It contains a few bold hints to the communist leadership; e.g. the name of the drunkard donor of the human organ implants is Chugunkin ("chugun" is cast iron) which can be seen as a parody on the name of Stalin ("stal'" is steel). It was adapted as a comic opera called The Murder of Comrade Sharik by William Bergsma in 1973. In 1988 an award-winning movie version Sobachye Serdtse was produced by Lenfilm, starring Yevgeniy Yevstigneyev, Roman Kartsev and Vladimir Tolokonnikov.

 

A minor planet, 3469 Bulgakov, discovered by the Soviet astronomer Lyudmila Georgievna Karachkina in 1982 is named after him.[16]

 

Salman Rushdie said that The Master and Margarita was an inspiration for his novel The Satanic Verses.[17]

 

Pearl Jam's song "Pilate" featured on their album entitled Yield has its lyrics inspired by the novel. The lyrics were written by the band's bassist Jeff Ament.

 

The 2011 play Collaborators by British playwright John Hodge is a fictionalized account of the relationship between Bulgakov and Joseph Stalin.

 

 

His other writings are well worth a read especially The White Guard. The two sci fi novels mentioned above are quite remarkable in their plot considering that they were written in the 1920's. B)

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abarbarian

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fyodor_Dostoevsky

 

 

His books have been translated into more than 170 languages. Dostoyevsky influenced a multitude of writers and philosophers, from Anton Chekhov and Ernest Hemingway to Friedrich Nietzsche and Jean-Paul Sartre.

The Idiot (Russian: Идиот, Idiot) is a novel written by the 19th-century Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published serially in The Russian Messenger between 1868 and 1869. The Idiot, alongside some of Dostoyevsky's other works, is often considered one of the most brilliant literary achievements of the "Golden Age" of Russian literature.

 

The 26-year-old Prince Lev Nikolayevich Myshkin returns to Russia after spending several years at a Swiss sanatorium. Scorned by the society of St. Petersburg for his trusting nature and naiveté, he finds himself at the center of a struggle between a beautiful kept woman and a virtuous and pretty young girl, both of whom win his affection. Unfortunately, Myshkin's very goodness precipitates disaster, leaving the impression that, in a world obsessed with money, power, and sexual conquest, a sanatorium may be the only place for a saint.

 

The Brothers Karamazov has had a deep influence on many writers and philosophers that followed it. Admirers of the novel include Albert Einstein,[15] Ludwig Wittgenstein,[16] Martin Heidegger,[17] Cormac McCarthy[18] and Kurt Vonnegut.[19] Sigmund Freud called it "the most magnificent novel ever written" and was fascinated with the book for its Oedipal themes.

Franz Kafka is another writer who felt immensely indebted to Dostoyevsky and The Brothers Karamazov for influencing his own work. Kafka called himself and Dostoyevsky "blood relatives", perhaps because of Dostoyevsky's existential motifs.

James Joyce noted that "[Leo] Tolstoy admired him but he thought that he had little artistic accomplishment or mind. Yet, as he said, 'he admired his heart', a criticism which contains a great deal of truth, for though his characters do act extravagantly, madly, almost, still their basis is firm enough underneath... The Brothers Karamazov... made a deep impression on me... he created some unforgettable scenes [detail]... Madness you may call it, but therein may be the secret of his genius... I prefer the word exaltation, exaltation which can merge into madness, perhaps. In fact all great men have had that vein in them; it was the source of their greatness; the reasonable man achieves nothing."[22]

 

Magnificent is all I can say. B)

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abarbarian
A dystopia is a community or society that is in some important way undesirable or frightening. It is the opposite of a utopia. Such societies appear in many artistic works, particularly in stories set in a future. Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization,[1] totalitarian governments, environmental disaster,[2] or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to real-world issues regarding society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science, and/or technology, which if unaddressed could potentially lead to such a dystopia-like condition.

 

I had to look up DYSTOPIA and while my recommendations above may not quite fit the description completely I feel that they are in spirit suitable for inclusion here. They are good reads whatever the classification. B)

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V.T. Eric Layton

I was accusing abarbarian of post padding because he posted a new post for every book review. However, maybe it was best that he did it that way. It looks better. :)

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I was accusing abarbarian of post padding because he posted a new post for every book review. However, maybe it was best that he did it that way. It looks better. :)

excuses, excuses :devil:

btw: i like F451 more than other dystopic novels since it has an upbeat ending with possibilities of greater tomorrow. Heilnlein had a couple of stories/books like that as well.

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