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Scot

The Top 10 Most Annoying Things About Software

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<=== Blows  whistle and screams "FOUL" B) Prelude76 is a thief and he stole my punchline!waaaaaaaaaaah! :D
LOLbetter be careful. there's lots of FLIES stuck to the front of my<------- :D about the image blocker, i wish it had a "ADD SERVER" button when you view the list, as I can't right click and block D*** TEXT or FLASH ads yet, but could find out it's server location by going to 'properties'. maybe i'll put in a request. B)

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I'm probably pretty late, because I came here from an old newsletter from Scot's website, and didn't realize it was old until I looked at the post dates on this thread. But oh well, I'm posting anyway. :)I know some of these have already been discussed. There are a lot of messages on this thread, so it's difficult to check them all. I'll try not to spend too much time on the already mentioned annoyances.1. The Windows Registry. I don't think any further comments are necessary. :)2. Lack of printed documentation.3. Programs that store your documents (or whatever) in the Program Files folder. Is it just me, or wasn't the Program Files folder designed for... uh, programs? Backing up my computer is already hard enough without this making it so much more complicated.4. Programs that default to opening or saving documents to some bizzarely obscure location (like their own installation folder or in a Windows system files folder) for no apparent reason. (This includes Open and Save As dialog boxes that default to these locations).5. Programs that can't remember the last folder you used in the Open or Save As dialog boxes, forcing you to specify the same file or folder every time. Or programs arrogant enough to assume a specific location every time without giving you an option to change it (like the Windows Paint accessory).6. Unhelpful error messages, especially ones humans can't be reasonably expected to understand. Also, error messages that give you NO information whatsoever on what happened, much less how to fix it. 7. Modal dialog boxes, and windows that are unresizeable for no good reason.8. Windows that have their controls truncated because the window isn't large enough (quite rare, but I've seen it happen; having it happen just once is one too many times).9. Documentation that's only available on the Web (i.e., clicking Help takes you to a web page, and there's no real indication beforehand that you have to be online). If the program itself is on the hard drive, shouldn't the Help be there too?? And what if the website is down or you don't have immediate access to the Web, but need help with a program right now?10. The term "online help." Back in the old days, it used to mean help that's always available; i.e., that's on the hard drive along with the program and is immediately accessible. But nowadays with the Internet so popular, does "online help" mean it's on the Web or does it mean what it always meant before? Apparently, it means whatever meaning the software developer wants. I'd be hard pressed to find a more meaningless term.11. Lack of hotkeys for window controls and menus. This is becoming more and more common. Apparently many programmers don't realize that keyboards still exist.12. Hotkeys that don't work. Or, duplicate hotkeys for window controls and menus, basically making them useless. If the programmer took five minutes to decide on all the hotkeys, is it that hard to spend another five minutes actually testing them?13. Help files with bad links, i.e., clicking a help topic displays a message like "This topic does not exist. Please contact the application vender for an updated help file." It doesn't happen very often, but it's infuriating when it does happen. IMO, there's no excuse not to test and retest the documentation, which is just as important (if not more so) than the program itself.14. Install programs that aren't installers at all; they just connect back to the Internet and download more files, especially when this isn't made clear up-front. Imagine this scenario: you're using a laptop and you've just downloaded a program you really need (or so you thought), and you're ready to take a trip to somewhere where you will be without Internet access for quite a while. Once you're on the trip, imagine the joy of finding out that what you had just downloaded was only a program that--guess what?--needs to connect to the Internet to download the real program installer. How about giving us the real program in the first place??15. Programs that don't respect Windows user profiles. That means programs that change settings for ALL users (rather than for the one user that installed the program) and automatically starts up on ALL users as they log in (instead of the one that installed it), without permission.16. Programs that muck with other system settings completely unrelated to the program, with or without permission.17. Program uninstallers that don't completely remove the program, all its files, all its directories, and every last one of its Registry keys (read: just about every uninstaller in existence on this planet).

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Welcome to SFNL Forums TravisE!Never too late for a thread in this forum :)Thanks for bringing the topic back to the surface! :thumbsup:

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Hi TravisE, and welcome to the forums!! :) You make some good points, and I agree with most of them.Your number 6:

6. Unhelpful error messages, especially ones humans can't be reasonably expected to understand. Also, error messages that give you NO information whatsoever on what happened, much less how to fix it.
Is one of my least favorite things. Illegal operation??? WHAT illegal operation? Am I in trouble? :'( Number 9:
9. Documentation that's only available on the Web (i.e., clicking Help takes you to a web page, and there's no real indication beforehand that you have to be online). If the program itself is on the hard drive, shouldn't the Help be there too?? And what if the website is down or you don't have immediate access to the Web, but need help with a program right now?
Is something that I agree with...to a point. A good example of why I agree...Just yesterday, I was (foolishly) screwing around with my internet settings. Long story short I ended up not being able to connect to the internet. Whats the documentation say? "Consult our online help at http://www....." >_< ...If I could consult your online documentation, I wouldn't need to consult your online documentation!! But on the other hand, I can see why some "in-depth" help is online. Consider The Gimp (or Photoshop :P ). Application help should most certainly be installed with the program itself. But, say there is a fantastic tutorial for said application. It contains many large image files, tons of text, etc etc. Nice to be included but not necessary. So...I can see where it is useful for online help, but I agree that it is being abused.Numbers 15 and 16:
15. Programs that don't respect Windows user profiles. That means programs that change settings for ALL users (rather than for the one user that installed the program) and automatically starts up on ALL users as they log in (instead of the one that installed it), without permission.16. Programs that muck with other system settings completely unrelated to the program, with or without permission.
I can see where you are coming from, but I have to disagree. Many people, when admin'ing a Windows machine (especially XP) will run as their name (I am not innocent, I run as an Admin myself) with Administrator privileges, instead of Limited User privileges, with a separate Administrator account. With Admin priviliges, changes can be system-wide. I'm not saying that the software makers are right for trying to change settings system-wide rather than for the user only. I also can't say whether being a Limited User rather than an Admin would completely stop this problem (I'm sure it wouldn't). Finally, "without permission" is a...shaky term. Many times, the License Agreement will state changes will be made...only that statement is after an hour of reading legal-speak. I can't tell you the last time I read a license agreement. It could say in large caps that ALL FILES ARE NOW PROPERTY OF MICROSOFT, and I would still "Accept" because I don't read them. (Again, I'm not saying software makers are not guilty of going too far, I'm just saying legally, they might be doing everything they have to).Overall though, I agree with you. Good points! :thumbsup: And again, Welcome to the Forums!

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