Jump to content


 Photo

Beginner's guide to R: Easy ways to do basic data analysis

Today, 12:49 PM

Posted by Computerworld in Computerworld News

So you've read your data into an R object. Now what?

Examine your data object

Before you start analyzing, you might want to take a look at your data object's structure and a few row entries. If it's a 2-dimensional table of data stored in an R data frame object with rows and columns -- one of the more common structures you're likely to encounter -- here are some ideas. Many of these also work on 1-dimensional vectors as well.

Many of the commands below assume that your data are stored in a variable called mydata (and not that mydata is somehow part of these functions' names).

[This story is part of Computerworld's "Beginner's guide to R." To read from the beginning, check out the introduction; there are links on that page to the other pieces in the series.]

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



View the full article

0 Views · 0 Replies

 Photo

Beginner's guide to R: Introduction

Today, 12:45 PM

Posted by Computerworld in Computerworld News

R is hot. Whether measured by more than 10,000 add-on packages, the 95,000+ members of LinkedIn's R group or the  more than 400 R Meetup groups currently in existence, there can be little doubt that interest in the R statistics language, especially for data analysis, is soaring.

Why R? It's free, open source, powerful and highly extensible. "You have a lot of prepackaged stuff that's already available, so you're standing on the shoulders of giants," Google's chief economist told The New York Times back in 2009.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



View the full article

0 Views · 0 Replies

 Photo

Beginner's guide to R: Get your data into R

Today, 12:40 PM

Posted by Computerworld in Computerworld News

Once you've installed and configured R to your liking, it's time to start using it to work with data. Yes, you can type your data directly into R's interactive console. But for any kind of serious work, you're a lot more likely to already have data in a file somewhere, either locally or on the Web. Here are several ways to get data into R for further work.

[This story is part of Computerworld's "Beginner's guide to R." To read from the beginning, check out the introduction; there are links on that page to the other pieces in the series.]

Sample data

If you just want to play with some test data to see how they load and what basic functions you can run, the default installation of R comes with several data sets. Type:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



View the full article

0 Views · 0 Replies


Latest Discussions

Site Navigation

Online Users

1 members, 50 visitors and 0 anonymous users

Bing, Google, Corrine, Yahoo


Portal v1.1.0 by DevFuse | Based on IP.Board Portal by IPS