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bunsenlabs helium released


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#1 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 10:52 PM

Release announcement: https://forums.bunse...pic.php?id=4772

#2 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 03:28 AM

I like to audition OS's but could not find any mention of whether it allows a Live DVD
session or forces you to install. Lack of Live DVD is always a deal breaker with me...

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#3 OFFLINE   abarbarian

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 04:27 AM

View PostCluttermagnet, on 21 June 2018 - 03:28 AM, said:

I like to audition OS's but could not find any mention of whether it allows a Live DVD
session or forces you to install. Lack of Live DVD is always a deal breaker with me...

Thanks, Clutter

Architectures

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We offer combined live-CD and installation media for the Debian i386 (i686) and amd64 (x86-64) architectures.


https://www.bunsenlabs.org/

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#4 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 03:54 AM

Good review: https://www.distrowa...0625#bunsenlabs

And, the author clearly appreciates Openbox!

I've checked out the live session of BL "Helium" but haven't gotten around to installing it. Mainly because it took so long for them to get this Stretch-based release out -- like, a full year after I installed Stretch with Openbox, and several months after I installed the Stretch-based SalentOS 2.0, which also ships with Openbox. I don't think I'd say that SalentOS is better than BunsenLabs, but it's nice, and I've had it set up the way I like it for some time now so I haven't felt motivated to install Helium.

Anyway, I enjoyed seeing this review at DistroWatch!

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My only concern would be the project's long term future.

Yep, I've been thinking along the same lines. We've seen lots of Stable-based distros come and go...

#5 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 03:57 AM

The thing is, my netinstall of Stretch with Openbox, in my opinion, beats BunsenLabs and SalentOS, hands down. Except, not "out of the box," of course.

#6 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 08:27 AM

My experience has been that if you are an expert tweaker and customizer (I am not) or if you want more insight into how Linux works under the hood, you might as well go ahead and install Arch or Debian. If you just want something that works and looks good, try Mint, Ubuntu or MX-17.
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#7 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 09:17 AM

And, for a lot more control over what goes in, go with Debian or Arch or Slackware. More and more, I don't really care how things look out of the box. It's about what I can do with it. I think the "easy" distros are great but it seems like over time I run into fewer problems with a distro that takes more work to install and set up in the beginning.

#8 OFFLINE   sunrat

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:21 PM

BunsenLabs has one of the most civilised and helpful forums around.

I'm on a Stretch netinstall now, tossing up whether to stay here. I would probably miss some of the nice features of siduction though.
It's really refreshing to set up a really basic minimal install and then just add only the bits you want. ;) B)
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#9 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:26 AM

Debian netinstall, for me that's the way to go. Also, I used the "Minimal Installation" option for Kubuntu 18.04 and that went well. I agree about the BunsenLabs forums, very good. Also, they have a nice "Help & Resources" section in the Helium menu.

#10 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 07:37 AM

I run both Arch and Debian and I agree that you get lots of control over what goes in. Debian stable is also very... well... stable. But I've never had a problem with Linux Mint or MX-17 either. Arch is a bit trickier to install but is rock solid after that.
The rolling releases have given me update issues at times but they usually sort themselves out and help is readily available to diagnose the problem. My bottom line is to install at least one "easy" distro and support that if one of my neighborhood friends wants to try out Linux.
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#11 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 09:54 AM

View Postraymac46, on 26 June 2018 - 07:37 AM, said:

My bottom line is to install at least one "easy" distro and support that if one of my neighborhood friends wants to try out Linux.

Very cool! I do installations only for myself; I have a lot of admiration for folks like you who do things like this!

The so-called "easy" distros are quite important to the Linux world, and also very nice to have around. I sure am glad that Mepis was around back when I was new to Linux. I love that community over there, and I keep MX on a flash drive for the occasional live session, although I don't currently have MX installed here.

I spent a lot of time with Linux Mint as well, back in the day, but ultimately there were some things that turned me off of that distro; I think my last actual installation of it was Mint 9 ("Isadora"), which, if I remember correctly, was an LTS release. And I think that was the last release before they started to go with Cinnamon instead of GNOME 2. But I still have the Mint 2.2 ("Bianca") CD that I got from OSDisc years ago!

Anyway, the "easy" distros installed on my computers right now are BunsenLabs Deuterium (still haven't gotten around to installing Helium), SalentOS 2.0, and Kubuntu 18.04.

Debian might not be considered one of the "easy" distros, but it sure is a lot easier to install Debian these days than it used to be.

#12 OFFLINE   sunrat

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 09:10 PM

View Postsaturnian, on 26 June 2018 - 09:54 AM, said:

Debian might not be considered one of the "easy" distros, but it sure is a lot easier to install Debian these days than it used to be.
I had a funny thought - after 16 years of using Linux, most of them Debian-based, I see Debian as being easy!
Not long ago I set up a new MX install which has all sorts of little helper utilities. Nearly all of them I prefer to skip and use the CLI equivalent. For example, they have ddm-mx to install proprietary drivers. Instead I said to myself "I don't need no steenking utility" and just did apt install nvidia-driver. I love MX but think they're getting to a stage where some things get added just because they can, not because they're essential. I realise they may help new users, but there's a time where a person should be taught how to fish rather than just be given a fish.


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#13 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 08:25 AM

View Postsunrat, on 26 June 2018 - 09:10 PM, said:

Not long ago I set up a new MX install which has all sorts of little helper utilities. Nearly all of them I prefer to skip and use the CLI equivalent. For example, they have ddm-mx to install proprietary drivers. Instead I said to myself "I don't need no steenking utility" and just did apt install nvidia-driver. I love MX but think they're getting to a stage where some things get added just because they can, not because they're essential. I realise they may help new users, but there's a time where a person should be taught how to fish rather than just be given a fish.

This is exactly how I'm seeing things.

#14 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 08:56 AM

For my personal use, I have Arch and Debian. Linux Mint is installed on a desktop which the grandkids and my wife use. They are familiar with Windows and so they find the Cinnamon desktop pretty easy. I suppose I could support Debian for the seniors Windows users that want to get Linux on an old desktop but frankly, they will feel much better upgrading using the Update Manager in LM than learning the command line. I have enough aggravation with them as it is.
I also have MX-17 installed on an old laptop just for fun but I use the CLI to update and upgrade. MX-17 has a bit of utility overkill and I won't install that for my seniors "clients" either. They get LM Xfce if their hardware is too feeble for Cinnamon.

Edited by raymac46, 27 June 2018 - 09:00 AM.

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#15 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 08:20 AM

A good article on getting older folks using Linux.

https://opensource.c...ly-online-Linux
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#16 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 08:02 AM

Quote

Debian might not be considered one of the "easy" distros, but it sure is a lot easier to install Debian these days than it used to be.

Well yeah, but if you are going to netinstall on a laptop you better have an Ethernet cable handy and plugged in. It's been my experience that your wifi never works with Debian until you get the nonfree repository added and install the appropriate firmware for your wifi adapter. Maybe if you have an older Atheros wifi solution you'll be OK but even Intel didn't work on my Thinkpad.
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#17 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 02:28 PM

View Postabarbarian, on 21 June 2018 - 04:27 AM, said:

View PostCluttermagnet, on 21 June 2018 - 03:28 AM, said:

I like to audition OS's but could not find any mention of whether it allows a Live DVD
session or forces you to install. Lack of Live DVD is always a deal breaker with me...

Thanks, Clutter

Architectures

Quote

We offer combined live-CD and installation media for the Debian i386 (i686) and amd64 (x86-64) architectures.


https://www.bunsenlabs.org/

:breakfast:

OK, dumb question for the day: given that all my desktop towers have CPU's such as
Intel Core 2 Duo or Intel Celeron D etc. can I assume that I would choose the i386
option and not the AMD option? Reason I ask that  (not a single AMD processor on
premises, so far as I remember) is that all the various Debian (Linux Mint) updates
I accept and download invariably include some verbage relating to AMD whatever..
I mean, I am very used to seeing this AMD reference so at this point I am
feeling a little bit confused...

I will download and try a live session of this distro, and I'm thinking that likely the
i386 is the right choice...

Thanks, Clutter

Edited by Cluttermagnet, 06 July 2018 - 02:28 PM.

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his love of Linux, and thereby made the world a better place...

#18 OFFLINE   sunrat

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 07:22 PM

amd64 is the generic name for all 64 bit architecture no matter if it is AMD or Intel. It's named that because it was first introduced by AMD and later adopted by Intel.
Your Core2Duo is almost certainly a 64 bit processor whereas your Celeron D is 32 bit.
i386 will work on a 64 bit system with some limitations, but amd64 will not work on a 32 bit system.
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#19 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 08:48 PM

I have given up on 32 bit entirely. I haven't had a "serious" PC since 2008 that would not support 64 bit. Many distros are dropping 32 bit versions, Chrome doesn't work with 32 bit Linux any longer.
The last two 32 bit machines I had were underpowered Atom netbooks. I recycled them. My worst junker now - a Toshiba netbook from 2010 - has a 2nd gen Atom CPU that will support 64 bit.
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#20 OFFLINE   Hedon James

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 08:15 AM

While 32-bit has universal compatibility (in cases where i386 a/k/a 32-bit is available), you really want 64-bit (x86_64 or amd64, same thing) if your cpu supports it.  And many "32-bit" cpus are actually 64-bit capable....it's just that they ran 32-bit OS at a time when 64-bit wasn't prevalent yet, so they became known as "32-bit" even though they had 64-bit capability.  The easiest way to know for certain is to type "lscpu" in the terminal Clutter.

https://www.howtogee...-bit-or-64-bit/




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