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WiFi Extenders?


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#1 OFFLINE   JerryM

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 12:18 AM

I need something to extend the range of my home wifi. Here is a site that indicates the best ones.
http://bestreviews.c...wi-fi-extenders
The least expensive one is here.
https://www.amazon.c...25

Anyone used any of these?
Thanks, Jerry

#2 OFFLINE   securitybreach

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 06:03 AM

I have never used one but I know others who have and they work just fine. I have used an old router in repeater mode to accomplish the same thing though: https://lifehacker.c...d-router-915783

Sometimes it may be called Extend or something like that.
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#3 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 07:26 AM

I quit using them, just got a better router. The wifi extender might be OK if you get no signal at all.
Most wifi extenders cut your speed in half because they have to use some of the bandwidth to contact the router. I also had trouble with my wifi extender broadcasting a different SSID which confused ny wifi adapter and led to dropped signals. Mine was a D-Link DAP-1320
If I had a bad coverage problem I might try a powerline kit and then wire that to an old router if I needed a Wireless Access Point. Your mileage may vary of course.

Edited by raymac46, 06 June 2017 - 07:29 AM.

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#4 OFFLINE   JerryM

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 09:15 AM

Thanks for the replies. It is strange to me that only two rooms away from the router reduces the signal so much. Most of the time it is OK, but sometimes the Kindle does not receive the signal when turned on, and walking into the hall normally corrects it.
Thanks, again,
Jerry

#5 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 11:47 AM

What router do you have? Is it a combination router/modem supplied by your ISP?
Also if you have a lot of devices connected to your network you can run into interference on the 2.4 GHz band. I don't know if you could try 5GHz if the Kindle supports it.

Edited by raymac46, 06 June 2017 - 11:57 AM.

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#6 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 01:03 PM

This will extend your range and give you much better bandwidth and speed...

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:)

#7 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 02:08 PM

View PostJerryM, on 06 June 2017 - 09:15 AM, said:

Thanks for the replies. It is strange to me that only two rooms away from the router reduces the signal so much. Most of the time it is OK, but sometimes the Kindle does not receive the signal when turned on, and walking into the hall normally corrects it.
Thanks, again,
Jerry

If you live in an newer apartment, Jerry, there is the possibility that you have metal stud walls. Also, all wiring in apartments is run through EMT (metal piping). All these metal items in your walls create a "Faraday Cage" that shields in/out radio and other electrical signals. Back in the old days of cordless phones, we used to have issues in the service sector with folks bring phones in with complaints about short ranges. It was due to the signal not being able to propagate throughout the abode due to shielded wiring and metal stud construction in apartments and some newer homes. There isn't much you can do to remedy that situation. Hard wiring your Ethernet will resolve it, for sure.

Also, note... any and all metal objects around, near, or in line-of-sight between the receiving computer and the router wifi transmitter will affect signal strength and quality; this means metal filing cabinets, metal shelving, large electrical appliances (fridges, washer/dryers, televisions), etc.

#8 OFFLINE   securitybreach

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 02:32 PM

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on 06 June 2017 - 01:03 PM, said:

This will extend your range and give you much better bandwidth and speed...

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:)

That'll work :hysterical:
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#9 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 03:44 PM

Yuppers. I'm even thinking about running an Ethernet cable about 50' to my workshop to eliminate the need for wifi out there.

#10 OFFLINE   zlim

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 11:41 AM

Although my wireless signal reaches to any room in our home, including the basement, I prefer wired.
I have a pair of these Powerline adapters
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Since your Kindle can not be wired, consider getting a newer unit which has a wireless antenna.

Each adapter plugs into an electrical outlet. One unit near your router is wired to the router. The other unit can be moved from room to room so you can choose to use its wired or wireless capabilities.

http://www.pcworld.c...-powerline.html
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#11 OFFLINE   abarbarian

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 12:11 PM

This is probably overkill but it depends on what you need them for.

https://www.cclonlin...White-/NET2497/


Quote

Fast Dual Band Wi-Fi Speeds Up to 1200Mbps
Enjoy wireless speeds of up to 1200Mbps, including 867Mbps on the 5GHz band and 300Mbps on the 2.4GHz band. The TL-WPA8630P allows you to effortlessly extend your Wi-Fi network using your home’s electrical wiring. A unified powerline network supports seamless streaming video, action-packed online gaming, and stable web browsing on tablets, laptops, and smartphones in hard-to-reach places throughout your home.
Excellent Powerline Transfer Speed Up to 1200Mbps
The advanced HomePlug AV2 standard allows the extender to support 2x2 MIMO* with Beamforming Technology, providing users with ultra-fast data transfer speeds of up to 1200Mbps. This is ideal for supporting Ultra HD streaming video, online gaming, large file transfers, and other bandwidth-intensive activities on multiple devices simultaneously.

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#12 OFFLINE   ebrke

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 01:34 PM

View Postzlim, on 07 June 2017 - 11:41 AM, said:

Each adapter plugs into an electrical outlet. One unit near your router is wired to the router. The other unit can be moved from room to room so you can choose to use its wired or wireless capabilities.
I have a 10-year-old version of the adapters you describe. They still work well--I use them for mother's laptop since I've had to move it upstairs. Some years ago I read that you could sometimes run into trouble using multiple powerline adapters on the same network, but a single pair works really well.

Edited by ebrke, 07 June 2017 - 01:35 PM.

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#13 OFFLINE   zlim

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 02:29 PM

I bought a 3rd unit, same model just in case I needed to replace one or perhaps connect my husband's XP computer in a different part of the basement to the home network.
I bought the 3rd unit in 2011 so I probably have had the original two since 2010.
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#14 OFFLINE   goretsky

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 07:15 AM

Hello,

Please use outside-rated cable in conduit, trench it and ground appropriately.  Back when I was working in Woodland Park, Colorado in the mid-1990s we had a lightning strike directly on our building.  Didn't lose power, but all the UPSes in the server racks went off as they shunted the transient load, all the CRTs did the "wavy thing" as if they were de-gaussed, and our network... well, we lost a bunch of ports on our core Fast Ethernet switch and hubs attached to it, and some computers had to have their NICs replaced, too.  It turns out some of the strike must have grounded on our network wiring, as some of the Ethernet cable was melted into the conduit which distributed it throughout the offices we occupied.  I got a sawed-apart piece of it which I kept at my desk for a while.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

View PostV.T. Eric Layton, on 06 June 2017 - 03:44 PM, said:

Yuppers. I'm even thinking about running an Ethernet cable about 50' to my workshop to eliminate the need for wifi out there.

Dexter is a good dog.

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