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Sharing a drive with Windows?


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#1 OFFLINE   James M. Fisher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 01:47 PM

I am sure that somehow it is possible to read & write either an NTFS or FAT32 partition in SuSE Linux. But how?  ;)
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#2 OFFLINE   ross549

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 01:56 PM

Hi  James.....NTFS cannot be written to by linux yet. There is a drver being written, but it is still highly experimental.FAT32 is not a problem. All you need to do is mount the drive so it can be accessed.
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#3 OFFLINE   teacher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 02:00 PM

Konqueror is a good program to go to the drive.  Simply go up to / and then to /mnt/ and look for your windows drive.  It is normally labeled Windows or such and click on it.  or you can simply type /mnt/ in the address bar and it will show you all the possiblities.  If it is not there then you will want to mount it.To mount it, if it was your hda7 you would do this:$supassword#mkdir /mnt/windowsmount /dev/hda7 /mnt/windowscd /mnt/windows/ That would put you there.  Instead of calling it windows you could ncall it hda7 but it is faster to find if you label it as windows or C: or D: or another name that makes you think of windows.
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#4 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 02:25 PM

Never had problems reading from and writing to NTFS partitions (primary and logical) with the distros I've tried.

#5 OFFLINE   Bruno

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 02:32 PM

b2cm, on Oct 9 2004, 08:23 PM, said:

Never had problems reading from and writing to NTFS partitions (primary and logical) with the distros I've tried.
That is what I thought too . . . . . . to my info at least Drake ( sure with 2.6 kernel ) should be able to read/write NTFSB) Bruno

#6 OFFLINE   nlinecomputers

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 02:59 PM

Technically it is still a beta but I've never had it(NTFS read/write in Linux) not work.James did you install SUSE on a system that already had windows?  If so if you look in either the /mnt or the /media (I forget which) you'll find that SUSE already made a mnt point for your entire Windows hard drive.
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#7 OFFLINE   James M. Fisher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 03:53 PM

nlinecomputers, on Oct 9 2004, 02:57 PM, said:

James did you install SUSE on a system that already had windows?  If so if you look in either the /mnt or the /media (I forget which) you'll find that SUSE already made a mnt point for your entire Windows hard drive.
Yes, and I have the Windows drives in Konq just fine it's just that I cannot create a folder (for instance) on any NTFS partition. I do have a FAT32 partition I can share so this no big deal, I guess.The second hard drive in my system (NTFS) has all my documents and downloads, so I really wanted to have write access as well.
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#8 OFFLINE   Bruno

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 04:20 PM

Hi james . . did you try creating a directory using the commandline ? "mkdir" ( Or only the GUI ):P Bruno

#9 OFFLINE   martinultima

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 04:35 PM

Try this:
less /etc/fstab > ~/fstab.txt
Do that, and then upload the contents of the ~/fstab.txt file for us.  I may be able to find a solution (I've never tried NTFS, I use Win98SE myself, but I may be able to help you with fstab problems).

#10 OFFLINE   James M. Fisher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 04:59 PM

martinultima, on Oct 9 2004, 04:33 PM, said:

Do that, and then upload the contents of the ~/fstab.txt file for us.  I may be able to find a solution (I've never tried NTFS, I use Win98SE myself, but I may be able to help you with fstab problems).
Here you go:

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/dev/hda7            /                    reiserfs   acl,user_xattr        1 1/dev/hda1            /windows/C           ntfs       ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0/dev/hda5            /windows/D           vfat       users,gid=users,umask=0002,iocharset=utf8 0 0/dev/hdb5            /windows/E           ntfs       ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0/dev/hda6            swap                 swap       pri=42                0 0devpts               /dev/pts             devpts     mode=0620,gid=5       0 0proc                 /proc                proc       defaults              0 0usbfs                /proc/bus/usb        usbfs      noauto                0 0sysfs                /sys                 sysfs      noauto                0 0/dev/cdrecorder      /media/cdrecorder    subfs      fs=cdfss,ro,procuid,nosuid,nodev,exec,iocharset=utf8 0 0/dev/dvd             /media/dvd           subfs      fs=cdfss,ro,procuid,nosuid,nodev,exec,iocharset=utf8 0 0/dev/fd0             /media/floppy        subfs      fs=floppyfss,procuid,nodev,nosuid,sync 0 0
I can create a document and save it to my FAT32 drive, but not to my NTFS drive.
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#11 OFFLINE   martinultima

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 05:01 PM

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/dev/hda1            /windows/C          ntfs      ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0/dev/hdb5            /windows/E          ntfs      ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0
It's the ro - If I'm not mistaken, it stands for read only!!  Just remove that and it should work!!(I think :P )

#12 OFFLINE   Bruno

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 05:03 PM

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/dev/hda1            /windows/C          ntfs      ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0
Remove ro in that line James . . . ;):P Bruno

#13 OFFLINE   nlinecomputers

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 05:07 PM

Note that it is RO for a reason.  Read Write to NTFS drives is BETA.  I've never had a problem.  No one I've known has had a problem but you are doing things at a slightly higher risk.
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#14 OFFLINE   James M. Fisher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 06:41 PM

Thanks, all. Now how do I remove ro?  :P
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#15 OFFLINE   teacher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 06:45 PM

Open the file using vi!#vi /etc/fstabi to edit and Escape ZZ to close.
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#16 OFFLINE   James M. Fisher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 10:00 PM

teacher, on Oct 9 2004, 06:43 PM, said:

Open the file using vi!#vi /etc/fstabi to edit and Escape ZZ to close.
Not sure if I did this right, Julia: the '#' before the vi has no effect that I can see. Removing it works.How exactly do I implement the 'Escape ZZ'?Do I have to login as 'root' to do this?
James M. Fisher

#17 OFFLINE   havnblast

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 10:10 PM

I edit files using the File Manager Super Mode and than browse to the file and than open the file with a text editor than make the changes and save.I'm not sure if Suse has that File Manager or not, but it is nice way to edit files without the dreaded vi.

#18 OFFLINE   havnblast

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 10:11 PM

btw - yes you have to be root with vi

#19 OFFLINE   ross549

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 10:11 PM

James.....Vi is not the easiest thing to use, but with some practice, it is quite simple.# means you must be root or su to launch the command successfully. $ is the normal user prompt. You will be able to bring up fstab in the vi editor, but you will not be able to save the chage, because the normal user does not have write permissions for the file.So you type the command:
vi /etc/fstab
while logged in as root. The vi will come up as before. You are now in command mode. This is where the real power (and complexity) comes into play, but we just want to remove a couple charectors, so for that we will go into edit mode.Simply press the Insert key. The bottom line on your vi should now change to -Insert-, if I remembor correctly. You should now be able to make the needed change.When you are done, so you want to save the file. You can't do that now, because you are insert mode! Want to get back to command mode? Simply press Esc!Now to save the file on your way out, hold down the shift key and press "z" twice. The chages will be saved, and you will be unceremoniously dumped back on the command line. If you want to be sure the changes were saved correctly, simply do a "cat /etc/fstab" to display the file.
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#20 OFFLINE   James M. Fisher

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 10:33 PM

havnblast, on Oct 9 2004, 10:08 PM, said:

I edit files using the File Manager Super Mode and than browse to the file and than open the file with a text editor than make the changes and save.I'm not sure if Suse has that File Manager or not, but it is nice way to edit files without the dreaded vi.
Now that was MUCH easier!  :thumbsup:Although I still cannot save/copy/move a file to the NTFS drive....
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#21 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 10 October 2004 - 01:47 AM

How about changing "ro" to "rw,auto"?

#22 OFFLINE   Bruno

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Posted 10 October 2004 - 04:19 AM

Hi JamesFor all edits in Linux "Vi" is the best tool . . . but you better take a small little lesson to be able to manage: http://forums.scotsn...14&t=503&st=213 :) or: http://www.linuxclue...articles/08.htm

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How about changing "ro" to "rw,auto"?
Good plan b2cm !!:) Bruno




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