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Build your own or buy?


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Poll: Who built your computer?

Who built your computer?

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#26 OFFLINE   Hawkins

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Posted 13 July 2003 - 07:55 AM

I am just finishing up with a new Asus build an ATI card.  It has been great fun price shopping. If you build your own one good trick is to find the cheapest parts on pricewatch or bizrate, and then click through to the site. The catch is you need to only buy the item you clicked through. If you build your entire system through one website you will pay alot more for shipping and often they give you a special discount if you click through from a price comparison site. I priced my current system at $3000 on 3-4 sites buying all the parts from one web retailer, but by clicking through was able to get free shipping and much lower prices. Got it down to $2200, but I had to fill out way to many forms.The worst part was when my credit card company noticed "unusual activity" on my account from the 10 different charges from 7-8 different websites. They froze my card half way through, and it took me a week to figure out which charges went through, and which ones I had to reorder.... Even worse after I figured it all out, my monitor had gone UP in price $200 at the website I originally ordered from, and I couldn't find it that cheap anywhere (Viewsonic VX2000, $1045 up to $1099) so I spent another $50 at a different site. I think I'll have to get a new credit card number now with my CC info floating around in so many different places on the web.The new PC rocks though, and I won't find any large manufacturers putting together a system that will even approach mine for 6 months I'm sure.Cheers!!!

#27 OFFLINE   Ares

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Posted 14 July 2003 - 09:22 AM

B)  DIY, i love to spend hours on end on the net to just balance out what new parts to use, read the reviews, and search for places to get them. This way i know whats inside, instead of relying on what the salesrep says to you.

#28 OFFLINE   Ares

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Posted 14 July 2003 - 09:28 AM

Synquest, on Jun 10 2003, 01:07 AM, said:

If you build it yourself, or your local shop assists you,You get what you want, not what a marketing dud thinks you should have...You get 100% industry standard and upgradeable, not proprietary hardware and software...You don't spend the first two weeks (or longer) removing software you didn't want...Your tech support isn't in India... "Happy to be you! What can we do of me today sir?" hmmm...You're already ahead of the tech cycle because your machine didn't spend twelve months going through the R&D/manufacturing/wholesale/retail pipeline...You'll have a lot more fun playing (ok, working) with a computer you know inside and out...If you shop a little, you'll still spend less money!
I so agree with you!I spend a lot of time helping out older people with computer problems, most of them are off the shelf brand stuff, and you will not beleave what amount of ^&($R  there is running and life on those!Sometimes i even wonder how the poor thing is able to even boot  B)  usualy i grab a clean windows disk, and after saving settings do a reformat and clean install, amazing how fast those brand machines run after that hehe  B)

#29 OFFLINE   b2cm

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 02:03 PM

DIY.

#30 OFFLINE   FuzzButt

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Posted 16 August 2003 - 10:19 PM

Hawkins, on Jul 13 2003, 07:55 AM, said:

The new PC rocks though, and I won't find any large manufacturers putting together a system that will even approach mine for 6 months I'm sure.
So besides the Viewsonic what else are you sporting?

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#31 OFFLINE   trigggl

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Posted 20 August 2003 - 12:03 PM

One of these days, I'll have enough money and knowledge at the same time to build a decent computer.  I didn't realize at the time I bought my current MoBo that it had something called RDRam.  When I got it I was surprised that my Dimms would not fit in it.  Then, I learned that 800MB's per second wasn't as fast as it sounded because it's in series instead of parallel.  Now I'm stuck at 128MB's of ram and I have the option of running a little slower with PC100's on a Dimm riser that blocks my CPU cooling or pay the extra bucks for Rimms that are hard to find as single sticks.  They are made faster in newer boards by using 2 identical ones in parallel, but my i820 operates only in series.  I have succesfully run it with just the one 64MB stick (just to make sure).By the way, my board is very overclockable, so, that is another reason to build your own.  I have a PII 350 running at 483.  I eventually want to upgrade to a PIII 1GHz processor when I can find the right deal.  It is a slot 1 so I would have to get an adapter.  It may be easier for me to be satisfied with what I have till I can get a different MB.My video card is another story of what happens when you don't research.  I bought the cheapest GeForce 4 I could find only to realize for a couple dollars more you get DDR memory instead of SDRam on the board.  Of well, I'm not a serious gamer anyways.  It does the job.I've also recently decided to move over to Linux and that brings up hardware issues.  My ISA sound card isn't well supported.  I did get my Win Modem working though.Live and learn.
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#32 OFFLINE   BarryB

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Posted 20 August 2003 - 02:42 PM

LOL..I had to laugh..I buy orphan or refurbs and give em a home....out of 9 only 3 were bought new.
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#33 OFFLINE   SonicDragon

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 04:42 PM

This site was recommended in another thread. Looks like they have some nice stuff there.

#34 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 11:23 AM

:'( Build your own. Sense of pride and accomplishment, yes it is. I have had two given to me, one was older than I am (I think), it was military surplus, had MMX right on the front of the case. Have no idea what that meant but it did not take me but a month to wipe it slick. Don't know what I did but it would not work no more, it even had one of the old 5.25 floppy drives in it. Second one ended up as parts for my first good one built by a shop. Watched him for a couple of weeks and the thought was born. "I can do this" now about 30 or so machines later, I think I got it down, not so sure about the OS's though. What I
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#35 OFFLINE   bjf123

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 11:29 AM

I'm probably in the minority here, but mine have always been from one of the big boys, IBM, Compaq, HP, or Apple.  A local retailer recently started promoting a BYOS, build your own system, department.  I though it would be interesting to build my own system.  When I started looking at the costs, I can get a system that will do what I want from Dell for about $600.  To build the same system would end up being well over $1,000.  I just can't justify the cost difference.
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#36 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 11:29 AM

opppps ... wrong key ..  What I have learned is that it is a good idea to have an idea of the end result. Is it for just home/small business and some web surfing.  Is it for high end gaming and graphics design work and as I think Peachy said or someone did ... speed is  not the prime factor. Unless of course you can afford to connect up on a T1 or T3 line. I say that because most connections I have had d/l at 1.5mbps DSL an up load at 384kbps DSL , dial ups vary a lot, so that hauling butt machine that has a P4 cranking out at 3.6ghz is nice on the desk  but not fully utilized on the web since the connection is not as fast as the machine is.  But to each their own.
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#37 OFFLINE   beeTee

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 05:25 AM

I must've been busy (not around) when this poll was put out.  But I can see where much of the knowledge around here comes from.  to date, 46 of YOU do DIY machines.  I guess after the initial learning curve, the experience builds a great foundation of knowledge.  My current home system was built by a specialty shop my former employer knew/did business with.  got to pick all the parts, and the system came ready to install.  so I had to pick the "mom and pop" choice.   After reading this thread, I will surely build my own next time.  probably when the 64-bit starts taking over and the "old" stuff gets even cheaper.

#38 OFFLINE   claren44

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 05:45 PM

Guess I've run the spectrum too: first pc was mom-&-pop,then two 'big boys' (one thru a local dealer,the other at Costco :thumbsup: ),& now,my two yr. old from a build-it-yourself shop online. It's been perfect for my needs,&,like a good spouse,puts up with my quirks as I put up with its :) . It has an AMD Athlon 1150 on a nForce2 chipset. I listen to a LOT of music (I have an internet broadcast stream,so I'm always trying fresh material/checking rips from cds/etc.),& given my less-than-perfect hearing to start with,the audio quality is fine. I'm no Graphics Genius,but they look good to me,which is what 95% of people want. No hassles,just good basic stuff that works.Someday,I hope to go to a 1.8-2.4 Athlon & take the DDR Ram from 512 (480 available w/the chipset) to 1 gig. And,a 60-70 gb hard drive would be nice...Love & Peace,Clarence
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#39 OFFLINE   Douger

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Posted 24 March 2004 - 10:52 PM

I've been rolling my own since the mid 80s.I've usually worked with a full tower case, as I find it much easier to work with.I then upgrade in small steps...once I get the motherboard up and running, I'll pile on the peripherals.I've never got the latest and greatest, but I do have an adequete machine for the little bit of futzing around I do.I'll probably start the cycle over again this year...my AMD Thunderbird board is maxed out at 2200+. I'm waiting for the  64 bit boards to come down in price a bit, as well as development of software written for it.AMD Thunderbird 2200+1 gig PC3200 memory2-120 gig hard drives (Maxtor ATA 133 with 8 mb cache)CD-R/RWDVD R+R-R/WGeforce 4400 128 meg DDR

#40 OFFLINE   martinultima

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 05:14 PM

Right now I have a bunch of systems; my main PC is a 2000-model Dell L566cx, but it's only half original parts (I've upgraded it like crazy...)  The next system I get will probably be a DIY system, though.  I also have another desktop system (486) of unknown origin that I've been upgrading and recently rebuilt from scratch, an IBM PS/1 (another 486) that I modified a lot... I also have two laptops (a Pentium and a 286), but I haven't upgraded those (although the Pentium has been upgraded, I got it from a friend ;) )

#41 OFFLINE   Gary

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Posted 20 July 2004 - 06:24 PM

My last computer I built myself and it is still running great. My new computer is a Dell 4600 with a P4 3.0 ghz chip. I find that it is not cost effective to build your own any more with the prices of new PC's being so low. It does not feel the same however when I use the Dell as when I use my home built. The one that I built seems like a little part of me is in it while the Dell is just another PC.  I will vote DIY.

#42 OFFLINE   MikeHerIA62

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Posted 01 September 2004 - 05:00 PM

[B] Actually the first pc I built was a Sinclair ZX81 - it had 2k of memory and a membrane keyboard - I'm betting most here have not even heard of it. :hmm: The second one i built was a fast AMD 486 dx 40 and the latest is the one I'm on now. AMD XP1700+ that I built in 2002.  :happyroll: The next will be built within the next 3 months and will be a AMD XP3200 :angry: MikeHerIA62

#43 OFFLINE   Fedex

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Posted 09 September 2004 - 08:47 PM

I'd build it myself the hardest part is the configuration on the componests even new mobo'ds don't cooperate with hardware but the good news it's getting somewhat better slowly but surely! putting it together takes from 2 to 5 hrs most times it always helps to have a live pc as to where you can suft the web in order to trouble shoot *stuff*but building your own boxes is the only true way to get a custom System!Hang n there or hangout & stay Cool with a Hot chix had betters Enjoy this Life Cause it's the only one you'll get! save 4 the hereafter :thumbsdown:

#44 OFFLINE   jeffw_00

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 03:47 PM

the last machine we bought in our house was an IBM286 in 1988.  Everything since then, leading to my current 5 machines (assortment of P-II, P-III, P-iV) has been upgrades.  The first couple of times i bought the parts, but then I found a local shop whose prices were within 10% of the best web prices I could find (currently newegg.com), who would assemble and test for free.  So, for example, to upgrade a P-II, I just ordered a MB/processor/memory/case/video-card combo, for about $50 more than the best web price.  For my $50 they will build it, make sure it works, and support it if it breaks.Why do I spend the $50?  Because if I order and assemble the parts and they don't work, I don't really have the equipment to debug it, I also avoid the hassle of mail-order returns.  Call it 'comfort insurance' 8-}Just my $.02/j

#45 OFFLINE   Cams

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 05:25 PM

I bought a system three years ago and, about a year later, got the silencing bug. I wound up switching parts for silent parts until I got it reasonably quiet. When it became time for a new system, I wanted to build as silent a system as I could, so spent a good four months researching the components whilst waiting for the bank balance to go up a little, and the cost of my chosen components to come down a little. I've just completed the build, which is my first, and it is, I'm very happy to say, silent! I learned a lot from doing it and, although it was more difficult than I expected and frustrating at times, I'm glad I did it that way.

#46 OFFLINE   Cams

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 04:52 AM

Cams, on Feb 6 2005, 10:25 PM, said:

I've just completed the build, which is my first, and it is, I'm very happy to say, silent! I learned a lot from doing it and, although it was more difficult than I expected and frustrating at times, I'm glad I did it that way.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Just thought I would come back and post a link to my web page detailing the build of my system. As I said, it was built for silence and each component was selected on that basis.AMD64: the silent beastNow it looks like I'm going to need a new monitor too. Hmmmm, those 21.3" SyncMasters seem pretty nifty...

#47 OFFLINE   Peachy

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 10:19 AM

Geez, suspended hard drives? Is there a difference in noise level? The Antec Sonata Piano Black Super Mini Tower case uses rubber grommets to dampen the hard drive vibrations in the drive cages. That could have been another alternative. What happens if the clips loose their grip? I shudder at the thought! ;)

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#48 OFFLINE   Cams

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 11:00 AM

The difference is huge! The case I have also has grommets on the HDD cage but they're basically playing lip-service to silence. Suspending has completely decoupled the drives from the case and the elastic absorbs the vibrations. So no seek noise gets through to the case. As for the clips slipping, I've checked and rechecked; they're fine. I can lay the case on its side (which I did last night to remove the video card - bloomin' AGP clips that you can't see!) and the drive cage stays suspended. It's quite a common technique amonst silencing enthusiasts actually.

#49 OFFLINE   Jeber

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 02:20 PM

The only computer I own that I didn't build myself is my laptop, and when they start selling kits for those... ;)

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#50 OFFLINE   greengeek

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 03:02 AM

I went to your site Cams to see the silent case and got distracted by the cats and horse, my favourite animals.Oh yes, nice case too!




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