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#26 OFFLINE   ibe98765

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 06:06 PM

littlebone, on Oct 8 2003, 08:23 AM, said:

I'm just curious. What is the impact if I, as a buyer, get negative feedback from a vendor? Will other vendors refuse to let me bid on their auctions? Given that the vendor won't ship until I pay, the only thing the vendor can complain about me is that I am a pain in the neck, no?
There are number of lists that list bad eBay'ers (I came across this one recently: http://www.ebayersth...main/index.php).  If you get on one as a buyer, a seller may block you from bidding on their auctions.  Also, if you go to sell something at some time, I think your buying history comes into play also.

#27 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 09 October 2003 - 12:15 AM

ibe98765, on Oct 8 2003, 01:06 AM, said:

Scot, on Oct 7 2003, 08:21 PM, said:

But for most negative experiences (I'm in the middle of one now), I just don't leave feedback, or I might leave a neutral. Leaving negative feedback -- especially when you're new to eBay -- is the quickest way to stop getting good deals. Your reputation is everything. If the person you're trading insults with has a feedback of 700 or somthing, and yours is 22, the negative feedback is going to look much, much, much worse on you.
It seems to me that not leaving negative feedback because you are worried about YOUR reputation or being challenged simply *******izes the system.  This sounds too much like what I hear about our school systems today, for example, where no one is supposed to get negative feedback because their feelings might be hurt.  If someone deserves negative feedback, then you should give it.  Similarly, if a person deserves positive feedback, then you shouldn't be hesitant to give it.  Doing so makes the system work, stopping it from being compromised.  How can you make an informed decision if you know that other people are gaming the system, just like you?  If this is widespread, then eBay feedback numbers are meaningless!
Seems to me that both you guys are right.

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How can you make an informed decision if you know that other people are gaming the system, just like you?  If this is widespread, then eBay feedback numbers are meaningless!
ibe, you are right. On the surface, Ebay feedback is somewhat meaningless, being so biased towards all positive. But digging deeper will tease out a surprisingly accurate impression about actual negatives on an Ebayer that were never formally mentioned. As I say, if you learn to read between the lines, there is actually a lot of detail concealed there.

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But for most negative experiences (I'm in the middle of one now), I just don't leave feedback, or I might leave a neutral.
That is pretty much what I do, Scot. It is really for the best to avoid going negative because it is going to end up costing you unfairly due to revenge feedback (in most though not all cases). I just don't post any feedback if the experience was unfavorable. Besides, with that sort of trader, soon enough a more hot-headed Ebayer comes along and gives them both barrels.  :ph34r: Better him than me. I have seen this sort of problem self-resolve like that, time after time. I don't want the unfair negatives. Let somebody else catch the anger of bad Ebayers. Ignore them and quietly add them to your list of ID's banned from bidding in any future auctions you run.  :D I value my 100 percent rating highly and strive to keep it that way. I try to be very communicative and friendly and try to make it a positive experience for anyone I trade with. My feedback shows that, with numerous glowing comments. I'm not gaming the system with multiple ID's. I only have one. It is in no way worth risking my feedback just to throw in my two cents worth. If the guy was an idiot with me, he was an idiot with others, too. Let them take the flak. They probably have several Ebay ID's anyway.   :ph34r:  :D
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#28 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 09 October 2003 - 12:31 AM

littlebone, on Oct 8 2003, 10:23 AM, said:

I'm just curious. What is the impact if I, as a buyer, get negative feedback from a vendor? Will other vendors refuse to let me bid on their auctions? Given that the vendor won't ship until I pay, the only thing the vendor can complain about me is that I am a pain in the neck, no?
I think it is highly variable. For many folks, even with small feedback numbers- say under 10 or under 25, a negative or two is not necessarily fatal. It all depends on what the issues were and who did or did not do what. The cardinal sin on Ebay cuts only one way. It is considered to be very bad form to not immediately respond to an auction winner notification. This might require a simple email reply or it might require that you go to some web page and fill out some form. Whatever the seller asks, you have to respond on his terms (which should have been spelled out clearly in his auction boilerplate legalese type comments). Far and away the worst sin of all, however, is to not be prompt in sending your payment, once the seller has given you a total and a mailto address. Buyers get brutalized over these seemingly minor points, whereas sellers often get away with murder. Did you know, for example, that a seller can suddenly change his/ her mind and yank an auction for any reason- or no reason at all? They can do this repeatedly without taking any heat at all from Ebay. And nobody who considers themselves an 'injured party' gets to post  negative feedback because there was no completed auction with a winner. Wierd, eh? Actually, I think that plenty of reputable Ebayers have a few negatives, mostly undeserved, and they go on to be very successful in the long term. Most folks on Ebay are pretty nice and pretty understanding. You are very unlikely to get on any sort of undesirables list unless you have a major spat with another Ebayer and the comments flying back and forth get really nasty. A few sellers, only a few, have been badly burned by certain jerks, and so tend to be very hard on newbies with low feedback numbers or with any negatives at all. These are very few in number, however. When you come across one, the rather harsh comments in their boilerplate will certainly tip you off. Best to avoid these until you get more feedback. Then they will not give you any trouble.
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#29 OFFLINE   Scot

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Posted 11 October 2003 - 12:08 PM

Quick reply about negative feedback's effects for buyers: If you have less than 96% feedback (for some sellers it's less than 98%) as a relatively new buyer, many sellers will refuse to sell to you or may require you to send them information about yourself before they accept your bid. If an auction ends with no buyer, you may also be passed over by a seller who is contacting bidders after the fact. Sellers may also not take you seriously if you email them for information in advance of the close of the auction.One of the obvious tips I'm not sure if we've said is: Read the auction thoroughly before bidding.-- Scot
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#30 OFFLINE   Temmu

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Posted 11 October 2003 - 12:58 PM

no direct ebay experience.  :D 1.  co-worker bought a 1+ carat diamond engagement ring last month from a firm in ny.  acquired it for 30% less than anywhere else he looked.  had it appraised by 3 local stores and all agreed he'd got a great deal.2.  2nd co-worker's car died.  she bought a full-size van.  she had to drive from new orleans to tenessee (um, and back...) to get it, but still was a great deal.i can't directly recommend ebay, but i'm sure those two would!  :lol:
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#31 OFFLINE   ibe98765

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Posted 11 October 2003 - 07:39 PM

Scot, on Oct 11 2003, 09:08 AM, said:

Quick reply about negative feedback's effects for buyers: If you have less than 96% feedback (for some sellers it's less than 98%) as a relatively new buyer, many sellers will refuse to sell to you or may require you to send them information about yourself before they accept your bid. If an auction ends with no buyer, you may also be passed over by a seller who is contacting bidders after the fact. -- Scot
So make sure you do good business as both a seller and a buyer and you should get positive ratings.

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Sellers may also not take you seriously if you email them for information in advance of the close of the auction.One of the obvious tips I'm not sure if we've said is: Read the auction thoroughly before bidding.
It's generally too late to ask questions AFTER the auction.  The books I am reading both recommend that if you have any questions, ask them prior to bidding.  Otherwise, you may wind up owning something that doesn't meet your needs.   And if you bail on sale, that is a sure way to get a negtavie on your record and get banned from other auctions.

#32 OFFLINE   ross549

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Posted 11 October 2003 - 09:24 PM

Let me post a bit about my e-bay experience.....I have a feedback right now of 14, which is not high, but I have not received feedback from a few individuals. I have also sold several small items, with no problems. My most recent large purchase was my car. Before I bid or anything, I e-mailed the seller quite a few times with questions. Even after receiving the car, there was a problem- the CD player that was in the car did not work. The seller and I are butting heads somewhat over how to resolve the issue, because he advertised the car as "runs and drives 100%." He did offer me free reprogramming for the replacement (GM hardcodes the VIN of the car into the radio for security purposes), but he does not want to pay anything to have it done. I am waiting for him to respond to my e-mail right now.Bottom Line- buying vehicles on ebay can be somewhat a hit or miss affair. COmputers are not as expensive as a car, but the same thing applies as with car auctions. I have several rules for when I bid on a high ticket item....1. Pictures that show you clearly what you are getting, and not pics that are canned product images from the prduct webpage. With actual pics of the merchandise, you know exactly what you are getting, and what condition it is in. In the case of high dollar items (computers and up), the more pics the better.2. Description. I like to see a simple, understandable description that outlines exactly what you are getting, what payment options are, what shipping is, etc.3. Reasonable shipping rates that are clearly defined. 4. Feedback rating (seller) that is 99% positive or better. No negative or neutral feedback in the last 6 months.Final note on this rambling post-If you start to have problems with the other party in a transaction, use Squaretrade to help resolve the situation. Above all, be civil. Stress to the other party that you are simply trying to resolve the dispute, and want to walk away satisfied.-------------------I hope this helps someone out there. ;)
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#33 OFFLINE   ibe98765

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Posted 12 October 2003 - 07:47 PM

Just came across this useful looking reference:http://www.entrepreneur.com/ebaycenter

#34 OFFLINE   ross549

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Posted 10 November 2003 - 04:02 AM

I know it has been a few weeks, but I read ibe's link with great interest.A related question- does anyone here have any experience with selling on half.com?
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#35 OFFLINE   trigggl

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Posted 21 November 2003 - 03:35 PM

Jeber, on Sep 29 2003, 09:30 PM, said:

Scot mentioned missing that last bid on occasion.  Has anyone tried one (or more) of the software products I've seen offered that help you keep up on items you've bid on?  Do they work as advertised?
I used Bidwatcher recently to do a snipe bid.  Bidwatcher used to work for windows, but ebay made some changes and now only the Linux version works.The snipe bid worked, but I probably didn't even need it, since I was the only one to bid on the auction.  The snipe bid is currently set up to go out 10 seconds before the end of the auction.  It can be adjusted.  Bidwatcher monitors ebay items without using a browser, so you aren't slowed down by all the non-essentials.  This is quite helpful for someone on dial-up. The Bidwatcher program did seem to freeze up 5min away from the deadline, so I might need to adjust the refresh rate at that time period.  It did get the bid out, but left me in the dark as to what was going on.  I suspect that dial-up had a part in that.
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#36 OFFLINE   Lover of quiet computers

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Posted 07 December 2003 - 12:32 AM

One may never become aware of one of the most important "experiences" that may ever occur to a person on eBay every time they use it: a violation of the Fourth Amendment.

#37 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 11:15 AM

:'(  Ebay, addicting, is it ever. Since I started building computers as a sideline/hobby I have purchased all my components case included on Ebay. I have only encountered two mishaps one being the USPS crushed a case, which the seller promptly replaced with one of my choice from their inventory the other was a purchase of some RAM (ED0) which I have yet to find a mainboard that I can use it on. A local computer shop told me that the mainboards that use that type of RAM are not made anymore. Things that I have learned are that you can on occassion receive emails from third party persons telling you that they have the same item you are bidding on at less that what it was listed at ... watch out ... put that email in the trash. Another thing to watch for is the Dutch auctions, you can get some reallllly  good deals there, especially in the barebones computer auctions. Also look out for shipping charges on the larger items $45.00 or more is a bunch no matter how long  you look at it.
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#38 OFFLINE   genegold

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Posted 18 December 2003 - 01:23 AM

One thing I didn't see mentioned here is looking at whether the shipping costs are reasonable.  It says something about how the seller prices and runs his/her operation.  Some sellers sell a little lower and jack up the shipping charge.  Others are just plain exorbitant no matter what the price.  Sometimes with computer goodies, I wonder if a charge of $35 or so is a tip-off the seller is a regular store, the kind that advertises in the NY Times and charges high shipping.  In any event, $30 and up for a 15-17" LCD monitor is normally way too high. etc.  Reasonable shipping charges not only make the item more attractive, they create a good feeling about dealing with that seller.Gene

#39 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 18 December 2003 - 12:54 PM

:whistling:    In response to genegolds' comment about shipping, I currently have a bid in on a "brand new" still in the box 17" flat screen CRT monitor. The seller (this is the first time I have seen this too) provided the weight of the unit and the H, W and L of the box and then links to UPS and FedEx so that the shipping cost could be calculated. The only drawback is that the shipper did not provide his/her zip code so a little hunting through the USPS web site to get a zip code was necessary. In the end the shipping cost from a rough ball park zip code for Hollywood FL to my location in CA was rounded off to $40.00 as the next highest dollar. This is also in the same general amount as I have paid for other items from the FL area.  <_<
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#40 OFFLINE   genegold

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Posted 18 December 2003 - 11:30 PM

longgone, on Dec 18 2003, 11:54 AM, said:

:D    In response to genegolds' comment about shipping, I currently have a bid in on a "brand new" still in the box 17" flat screen CRT monitor... the shipping cost from a rough ball park zip code for Hollywood FL to my location in CA was rounded off to $40.00 as the next highest dollar. This is also in the same general amount as I have paid for other items from the FL area.  :)
Longone, I'm not clear what your point is.  It left me ondering if you're not confusing the idea of flat screen CRT with a flat panel LCD.  In any event, 15-17" LCD monitors these days usually weigh under 10 lbs, sometimes well under.  A 17" CRT, flat screen or not, typically comes in at 40-50 lbs or more packaged.  For an individual seller (vs. a company with volume shipping rates), $40 may be very reasonable (a 40 lb package NY to LA ground is $40).  However, $6 is not reasonable for a single-CD copy of Norton Firewall with or without manual, or for a several ounce pack of Norelco shaver heads.  And $35 seems exorbitant for a 10-lb LCD monitor package that comes via UPS ground, whether from Florida or elsewhere.

#41 OFFLINE   ibe98765

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Posted 18 December 2003 - 11:39 PM

Don't forget that you are not paying just for SHIPPING.  There is also the HANDLING component (S&H, right?).  It takes time and materials to properly pack something.  There might also be insurance charges.

#42 OFFLINE   longgone

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 03:08 PM

genegold:    I do not have CRT and LCD confused, not at all. The point or subject was that as you stated the $40.00 charge for the 39 pound box was not unreasonable. Also as you stated the $6.00 fee for a single Norton CD is way out of line, considering that I just received from FreeSoftwareCDR the 6 CD version of RH9.0 and the postage on the shipping box was $1.35. But for sure I agree with you on some of the shipping prices being way out of line in regard to type of packaging and distance sent.
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#43 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 20 December 2003 - 02:05 PM

Ebay and the entire mail- order field in general are notorious for this. It comes down to an argument over whether the seller is an individual or a business, applying standard business practices in the shipping area. Many do charge 'handling', materials costs, etc. 99 times out of 100, that is a deal- killer for me. Exorbitant shipping costs are one of the natural checks and balances that have been in action over many years, and are the reason why mail order never totally killed off the 'brick and mortar' local, physical stores. Often, a calculation will show that a particular deal is actually more expensive than going shopping for your item locally and paying state sales tax. Just as an example, when I still bothered to follow the RAM stick auctions on Ebay, I quickly learned that I was looking at used merchandise at times, and it was not always clear whether an offering was new, NOS (new old stiock = surplus), or used. At my local Best Buy and Comp USA, there are fairly regular sales on these items, and I get a discounted, new RAM stick with a full warranty which is cheaper even after tax. This is an area where Ebay only seems to be really useful if you want smaller memory (64M, 32M) or older memory, which is very high priced in the stores because it is no longer popular, high volume stuff.
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#44 OFFLINE   ibe98765

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Posted 21 December 2003 - 01:20 AM

Quote

NY TimesDecember 21, 2003Now You Can Leave the eBay Selling to ThemBy KAREN ALEXANDER When Marc Strohlein bought a mountain bicycle a few years ago, he put his old racing bike in the garage and forgot about it. It languished there until recently, when he noticed a highway billboard in the heart of Silicon Valley offering a tempting proposition: "You drop it off. We sell it on eBay."So, on the day before Thanksgiving, Mr. Strohlein, 49, a market research analyst from El Granada, Calif., packed the racing bike into his sport utility vehicle and hauled it to Auctiondrop Inc. in San Carlos, Calif. The company is one of a handful of new businesses that will take in a customer's merchandise, photograph it, post it on eBay, the Internet auction site, then ship it to the winning bidder. (Customers drop off the merchandise themselves.) Entrepreneurs both large and small are betting on this business model. In recent months, the companies have set up more than a dozen consignment operations, from California to Alabama, specifically to take in merchandise to sell on eBay. They offer an old-fashioned storefront approach to the global, high-tech marketplace of Internet auctions. Some have aspirations of becoming national enterprises.Others in the business offer these services on their own from their homes. An estimated 30,000 people do so through eBay's trading assistants program, which is now two years old. (The site is pages.ebay.com/ sellercentral/formstools.html; click on "trading assistants.")Sell your stuff on eBay through a proxy


#45 OFFLINE   genegold

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Posted 21 December 2003 - 02:14 AM

ibe98765, on Dec 18 2003, 10:36 PM, said:

Don't forget that you are not paying just for SHIPPING.  There is also the HANDLING component (S&H, right?).  It takes time and materials to properly pack something.  There might also be insurance charges.
Yes, there are certain kinds of items where handling can a time-consuming matter.  But in dealing with computers and related, that's mostly not the case.  I mean, how much does it take in time and materials to package a brand new monitor in its sealed factory box?  Or a Norton CD?   There's a guy who's been listing a bunch of a well reviewed new Viewsonic 17" LCD monitors in box that charges $60 shipping (USPS) or $39 "order processing fee" if you pick it up directly.  As Cluttermagnet points out, these sorts of practices tend to drive good customers away and sour the whole process.  I've sometimes politely asked sellers like this about it, and they invariably respond somewhere between insistent and belligerent.

#46 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 21 December 2003 - 02:23 PM

After a while, you develop a good sixth sense about Ebay offerings. It is usually easy to figure out who is an individual seller, who is a legitimate business, and who is an individual posing as a business. Many sellers gouge just shamelessly. You need to develop a sense of what is fair and reasonable for shipping. This can vary considerably between private individuals and businesses, but it is a well- known fact that many sellers are gouging on shipping. You think you got a good deal, a nice low price on your item, but if you didn't bother to carefully read all the fine print including shipping info, the seller can pull virtually anything on you and you have no choice but to go along with it, no matter how unreasonable. Fail to do so, and you are in violation of the rules of that particular auction, which are pretty much whatever that seller decides they are. Such rules are usually written down, but you will be amazed just how many sellers don't spell out what the shipping is going to cost, or more important, what rules and fees are to be applied in making that calculation. So caveat emptor- beware- at the selling rules level, as well as regards the condition and value of the auction item.I have seen a lot of items with a 10 dollar shipping charge for tiny, lightweight items. Say a 64M PC100 RAM strip. Opening bid is 5 dollars, and you might even get it for that. Then you see in the fine print there is going to be a 10 dollar shipping charge. Move on. Don't get suckered. You always need to weigh the shipping charges in any value calculations you are making. How many times have I seen rookies getting stung in auctions such as this RAM item. Be aware that many sellers are actually making it on their outrageously inflated shipping fees, not on the final price on their items. Win their auction, you are going to pay that fee. Fail to do so and you get negative feedback. Not the end of the world, but not a good thing either. Ebay is overall a seller's venue. The rules are heavily weighted in favor of sellers, which are the lifeblood of Ebay. Oh yes, they have rules that protect you, the buyer, but on Ebay the seller definitely reigns supreme and is accorded a lot more protections than you are. Including the right to even overcharge outrageously on shipping to make up for an artificially low asking price on their items. Lots of newbies and suckers fall for this every day of the week. You must know the value of what you bid on and what is a fair and reasonable and customary shipping charge on such items.
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#47 OFFLINE   ibe98765

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Posted 24 December 2003 - 06:31 PM

I just brought a digital camera battery on eBay.  Weighs 26 grams (just about 1 oz).  Battery cost $10.99.  I paid $2.50 S&H!  Seller advertised that he didn't rip people off with high shipping fees, which encouaged me to buy from him.  While looking across the net for this battery, I came across a large number of sites that were charging between $5.99 - $10.49! for S&H on the same battery and the battery cost ranged between $12.99 - $32.99!  It pays to check eBay before buying ANYTHING...

#48 OFFLINE   Cluttermagnet

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Posted 25 December 2003 - 07:21 AM

ibe98765, on Dec 24 2003, 05:28 PM, said:

I just brought a digital camera battery on eBay.  Weighs 26 grams (just about 1 oz).  Battery cost $10.99.  I paid $2.50 S&H!  Seller advertised that he didn't rip people off with high shipping fees, which encouaged me to buy from him.  While looking across the net for this battery, I came across a large number of sites that were charging between $5.99 - $10.49! for S&H on the same battery and the battery cost ranged between $12.99 - $32.99!  It pays to check eBay before buying ANYTHING...
Good going. The educated buyer gets some good bargains on Ebay. I am one of those sellers who don't gouge on shipping. Haven't been active for a while, but when I was, I gave my buyers a break, usually charging my actual shipping payout and nothing else. (i.e. free shipping materials, free packing, free 'handling') There are plenty of private sellers on Ebay who are a pleasure to deal with and sometimes have some really good deals. >_< Happy holidays all! And have a great 2004.
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("It takes an entire village to raise a child...")
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"Hey, Mel- isn't that your kid driving that bulldozer?"

In loving memory of Bruno Knaapen of Amsterdam, who shared
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#49 OFFLINE   murphy2003

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 07:49 PM

So far have gotten A CPU,Printer and a H.D. from ebay with no problems also some software B)

#50 OFFLINE   epp_b

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 08:38 PM

Woah!  Look at the date on Cluttermagnet's last post there! :lol:Guess it's never too late to pull up a good thread - especially a gem like this one B)




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