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Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Operating System Officially Relea


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#1 OFFLINE   securitybreach

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:35 AM

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More than two years after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" series, which, as of today, is marked as "oldstable," the Debian Project is pleased to announce today the availability of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch".

As of a few minutes ago, Debian Stretch or Debian 9 has been declared stable and ready for deployment in production environments. It's one of the most anticipated GNU/Linux distributions of 2017, on which numerous upcoming Linux distros will be rebased in the months to come.

Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" is a major release that includes better support for modern hardware components and architectures, up-to-date core components and applications, as well as dozens of other new features, stability and security improvements, and countless bug fixes.

"After 26 months of development the Debian project is proud to present its new stable version 9 (code name "Stretch"), which will be supported for the next 5 years thanks to the combined work of the Debian Security team and of the Debian Long Term Support team. Debian 9 is dedicated to the project's founder Ian Murdock, who passed away on 28 December 2015," reads the release announcement.

Highlights of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

Highlights of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" release include support for the 64-bit little-endian MIPS (mips64el) hardware architecture, removal of support for the PowerPC (powerpc) architecture, new deb.debian.org mirror, and support for the X.Org Server display server to run as a regular user rather than as root.

Major improvements were implemented to the APT and aptitude command-line package managers, as well as the archive layouts, since the Jessie series, there's now a new archive for debug symbols, called debian-debug, and it looks like a new standard naming scheme is now used for naming network interfaces. Debian Stretch is also shipping with the first release of the Debian Astro Pure Blend.

Updated components include Linux 4.9 LTS kernel, GCC 6.3 as default compiler, Glibc 2.24, GnuPG 2.1, MariaDB 10.1, PHP 7.0, Python 3.5, Samba 4.5, Vim 8, GNOME 3.22, KDE Plasma 5.8, LXQt 0.11, MATE 1.16, and Xfce 4.12 desktops, Evolution 3.22 groupware client, as well as LibreOffice 5.2 and Calligra 2.9 office suites.....
http://news.softpedi...ow-516521.shtml
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#2 OFFLINE   securitybreach

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:38 AM

I just upgraded the Jessie VM and there were 849 packages upgraded on the vanilla debian gnome image.
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#3 OFFLINE   Dr. J

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 12:01 PM

So I'm on Stable now... Cool :yes:

PowerPC support is gone... :ermm: . I was only looking at an old(ish) PowerPC based iMac in a small computer shop the other day. I wasn't going to get it anyway, but I was curious to see how one of those would run with Debian.
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#4 OFFLINE   sunrat

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 07:33 PM

Official announcement:
https://www.debian.o...s/2017/20170617

It's advisable to read the release notes before upgrading - https://www.debian.o...ch/releasenotes
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#5 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:57 PM

View Postsunrat, on 18 June 2017 - 07:33 PM, said:

It's advisable to read the release notes before upgrading - https://www.debian.o...ch/releasenotes

That's something I still haven't tried -- upgrading from one Debian release to the next. I always do a fresh installation.

Well, I have two Stretch installations, one with Xfce, one with Openbox, both done when Stretch was still in Testing. They've both been great.

My remaining Jessie installation (with KDE + Openbox), I think I'm gonna hold off for a bit before replacing that one with Stretch. Perhaps some emotional attachment there, or maybe I'm just feeling lazy at the moment (summertime, and the livin' is easy...).

If/when I get around to it, I'll install Stretch with GNOME, on another computer.

Live install images are also available, for those who like to go that route (https://www.debian.org/CD/live/). Some users are reporting problems doing installations from those live isos; haven't tried it myself (with Stretch), but I've had good luck in the past with doing installations from the Debian live images.

#6 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 06:48 AM

Live installs are great if you need a rescue disk but it's really convenient to use the netinstall minimal ISO to get Debian on the rails. That way you get all the latest packages and have an up to date installation from the get-go. A live DVD gets stale pretty fast.
I just make sure to netinstall with a wire connection. It's faster and you know if you have trouble with wifi you can sort that out while you are connected to the Internet. You can get the non-free firmware you need.
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#7 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 06:50 AM

BTW I've been chugging along without a safety net - using Debian unstable - and so far so good. But that is on the rails in a Linux friendly laptop (no VirtualBox.)
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#8 OFFLINE   securitybreach

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 07:43 AM

View Postraymac46, on 19 June 2017 - 06:48 AM, said:

Live installs are great if you need a rescue disk but it's really convenient to use the netinstall minimal ISO to get Debian on the rails. That way you get all the latest packages and have an up to date installation from the get-go. A live DVD gets stale pretty fast.
I just make sure to netinstall with a wire connection. It's faster and you know if you have trouble with wifi you can sort that out while you are connected to the Internet. You can get the non-free firmware you need.

Yup :thumbsup:
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#9 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 10:58 AM

View Postraymac46, on 19 June 2017 - 06:48 AM, said:

Live installs are great if you need a rescue disk but it's really convenient to use the netinstall minimal ISO to get Debian on the rails. That way you get all the latest packages and have an up to date installation from the get-go. A live DVD gets stale pretty fast.
I just make sure to netinstall with a wire connection. It's faster and you know if you have trouble with wifi you can sort that out while you are connected to the Internet. You can get the non-free firmware you need.

They're also nice (but not perfect) for getting a feel for how a release will perform with your hardware.

For Debian, I generally prefer a CD-1 iso or a netinst iso. For one of my computers, though, I want to try a live session before I attempt a Stretch installation.

Also, I'm looking for the amd64-kde-CD-1 iso but I don't see it available yet. Interesting, folks like to say that GNOME is the default for Debian, but right now only the Xfce CD-1 is available at this page:
https://cdimage.debi...t/amd64/iso-cd/

#10 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 11:13 AM

Also, whether it's a netinstall or a CD-1 iso or a DVD iso or a live image, you're still using the Debian installer and you're gonna be up-to-date as soon as you apt-get upgrade or whatever. Actually, I prefer to use Synaptic, and I think updating with that runs apt-get dist-upgrade.

Anyway, one advantage of not using the netinst iso is if you have to reinstall or if you want to do multiple installations, saves a little time at the start. But then you still have to update anyway, so... I guess that's why they provide different types of images, for different types of situations.

#11 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 11:40 AM

I suppose with the speed of broadband these days it is probably a time toss-up whether you download the netinstall mini-ISO or the actual live desktop you want. Probably takes a tad longer to netinstall, but I find that method so slick I generally use it. If I were testing out a completely new desktop or distro I'd want to get the live ISO for sure, but Debian is a known quantity by now - especially with the GTK desktops.
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#12 OFFLINE   Dr. J

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 02:22 PM

I generally download the full installer image for Debian. I have to be in a place with decent broadband speeds, but then I can just hold on to the ISO and install it with all major desktop environments without having to worry about that intermathingy whatsit... which is nice because speeds are quite slow in my area.
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#13 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 10:33 PM

View PostDr. J, on 02 July 2017 - 02:22 PM, said:

I generally download the full installer image for Debian. I have to be in a place with decent broadband speeds, but then I can just hold on to the ISO and install it with all major desktop environments without having to worry about that intermathingy whatsit... which is nice because speeds are quite slow in my area.

There are some days here when my connection cuts out in the middle of what I'm doing. Usually the connection's good, but not always. Most of my installations these days are done with via netinstall, but sometimes it really makes more sense here to download a larger image and get that part over and done with.




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