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Time to get back to Linux


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#51 OFFLINE   ebrke

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 06:26 PM

View Postraymac46, on 12 July 2018 - 06:07 PM, said:

Quote

Raymac, did you just delete all partitions with something like gparted when you got rid of win10? Did you have any issues deleting the epi partition?

All I did was boot the Debian netinstall image from USB. Then I let the installer reformat the SSD and take it over, deleting everything on it. Debian formatted it as MBR and I have basically two partitions - one for the O/S and one for swap.
As I said earlier the setup boots in legacy format, so no need for EFI partitions.
My original issue was reading about some dual boots with linux/win10 on lenovo machines where users couldn't access uefi firmware when desired at startup due to issues with win10 not allowing it. I figured to be safe I'd rather get rid of win10 since I don't want to use it anyway. At this point, I think I'll have to just try the install as best I can when I get the machine and just see what happens. I'll have machine I'm currently using as a working backup (I hope--it's 9 years old and I don't feel I can really depend on it anymore) to ask questions if I get hung up. While I have read the basics on UEFI, I haven't yet had a system that uses it--I'm always using older hardware I take from my mother when I buy her a new windows machine.

Edited by ebrke, 12 July 2018 - 06:29 PM.

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#52 OFFLINE   mhbell

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 06:45 PM

If you want to keep your windows that the machine comes with and don't want to mess with UEFI, you could always tell your Linux install to install along side windows if Suse lets you do that. Most people who are using legacy (MBR) have older computers with a Bios that does not support UEFI. The Bios has to support it. If the machine you are getting comes with windows 10 it probably has GPT partitioning and a UEFI Bios. Another thing most computers with UEFI Bios have a provision to disable secure boot. All modern computers now days have a UEFI Bios and most OS's are capable of installing on a GPT partitioned computer with UEFI. as a matter of fact you have to have a UEFI Capable Bios for GPT partitioning. If the computer you are getting Wont let you boot because of windows secure boot just turn it off in the Bios. You may have to press a key like F9 during boot upto choose the drive or partition you want to boot. My HP laptop is that way.
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#53 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 06:56 PM

I am pretty sure my T430 originally came with Windows 7 but when I got it last year as a refurb it had been upgraded to Windows 10. The setup is UEFI capable but will boot a legacy disk if desired. If I wanted to install a distro with a GPT/EFI setup that wouldn't be a problem.
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#54 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 07:09 PM

If you check through the Lenovo documentation you'll see that the T430 hasn't been tested by them for Windows 10 - they prefer you get something newer. That said the refurbishers install Windows 10 and it probably works just fine.
I wasn't at all interested in running Windows on it - it's a great Linux machine and that is why I have it.
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#55 OFFLINE   ebrke

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 07:57 PM

View Postebrke, on 12 July 2018 - 05:52 PM, said:

I believe openSUSE creates efi partition during install if Secure Boot option is enabled
Oops, my bad. Went back to the documentation and the sentence actually reads "If YaST detects EFI mode during the installation, it will try to create a GPT partition." Huge difference. I have to learn to read more carefully.

SUSE has a custom partitioning option in the install--I'm going to have to go in there and see exactly what partition setup it's proposing and work from there. I still think I'm going for Legacy Boot.

Edited by ebrke, 12 July 2018 - 07:59 PM.

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#56 OFFLINE   abarbarian

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 04:12 AM

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If it helps here is a screenshot of my dual boot with Windows7 and Arch on a UEFI set up.

I installed Windows first and it created the first three partitions automatically. I limited the Windows install to half of the ssd. Arch was installed with a swap on the last three partitions. Arch's bootloader was put in the EFI partition,Windows automatically puts its boot loader in there too. rEFind was used rather than grub as it is easier to use and works automatically with Windows.
I believe Windows 10 will install in a similar fashion but as I am lucky enough not to have any experience of it I can only hazard a guess. :breakfast:

Edited by abarbarian, 13 July 2018 - 04:15 AM.

Install ARCH
You'll never need to install it again
"I did and I'm really happy"

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#57 OFFLINE   raymac46

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 08:30 AM

Bottom line:
  • If you want to dual boot with Windows 10 you'll be faced with the UEFI / Secure Boot / Fastboot situations. Most Linux installers can cope with it if Secure Boot and Fastboot are disabled.
  • If you just want Linux the installer defaults will be fine. Either Legacy or UEFI will do a good job depending on how your motherboard's firmware is configured.
  • If you run either Windows or Linux and need the other O/S once in a while, just try a Virtual Machine.
  • I really like the idea of using rEFInd as your boot loader with dual boot situations, UEFI. Windows 10 and all that jazz.

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#58 OFFLINE   mhbell

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 03:14 PM

This is the way mine is set up for multi Boot linux only on SSD 1 (sda). I only use GPT partitions and UEFI. I use GPT because I don't have to have a extended partition. All partitions are primary with GPT Partitioning. See the link below for a Image.
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#59 OFFLINE   ebrke

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 04:30 PM

Thanks everyone. I'll see what happens once I finally get started (that is, when I can decide what to buy). I've done lots of SUSE installs over the years, but as I said, UEFI is new to me.
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#60 OFFLINE   V.T. Eric Layton

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 06:37 PM

UEFI-DOOFIE-DOOOO!

#61 OFFLINE   Hedon James

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 08:06 AM

View Postebrke, on 13 July 2018 - 04:30 PM, said:

Thanks everyone. I'll see what happens once I finally get started (that is, when I can decide what to buy). I've done lots of SUSE installs over the years, but as I said, UEFI is new to me.

As someone who has done both UEFI and MBR installs, I can honestly say that, from a user perspective, there's no difference.  All the differences and nuances are under the hood.  Once you make those "under the hood" decisions, as the architect of your system, the install process will look like every other installation you have done.  FWIW...

#62 OFFLINE   Ed_P

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 11:31 PM

Grub2Win supports EFI systems, you just need to disable the SecureBoot option.

I duel boot to Linux all the time but I boot ISOs.

Edited by Ed_P, 14 July 2018 - 11:34 PM.

Ed

#63 OFFLINE   ebrke

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Posted 15 July 2018 - 01:54 PM

OpenSUSE install allows a secure boot option on install, but I really don't think I want to bother. I'm thinking about it.
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#64 OFFLINE   abarbarian

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:52 AM

https://doc.opensuse...up_color_en.pdf

This Suse install doc has some excellent information. Especially at section 3, this is just a sample, reading the whole section would useful.


Quote

Custom Partitioning on UEFI Machines
A UEFI machine
requires
an EFI system partition that must be mounted to
/boot/efi
.
This partition must be formatted with the
FAT32
le system.
If an EFI system partition is already present on your system (for example from a previous
Windows installation) use it by mounting it to
/boot/efi
without formatting it.
If no EFI system partition is present on your UEFI machine, make sure to create it. The EFI
system partition must be a physical partition or RAID 1. Other RAID levels, LVM and other
technologies are not supported. It needs to be formatted with the FAT32 le system

Quote


Handling of Windows Partitions in Proposals
In case the disk selected for the suggested partitioning proposal contains a large Windows
FAT or NTFS partition, it will automatically be resized to make room for the
openSUSE
Leap installation. To avoid data loss it is strongly recommended to
make sure the partition is not fragmented (run a defragmentation program from Win-
dows prior to the
openSUSE Leap
installation)
double-check the suggested size for the Windows partition is big enough
back up your data prior to the
openSUSE Leap
installation
To adjust the proposed size of the Windows partition, use the
Expert Partitioner
.

I was darn well impressed with the entire document as it contained a ton of clear and well presented information. Especially liked the section on SHELL and BASH.

:breakfast:

Edited by abarbarian, 16 July 2018 - 05:53 AM.

Install ARCH
You'll never need to install it again
"I did and I'm really happy"

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#65 OFFLINE   saturnian

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 06:04 AM

View PostEd_P, on 14 July 2018 - 11:31 PM, said:

I duel boot to Linux all the time but I boot ISOs.

I'm gonna have to try doing this sometime.

#66 OFFLINE   ebrke

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Posted 16 July 2018 - 04:00 PM

Thanks, Erik, that's a document I missed. :thumbup: This will be my first OpenSUSE install on a machine with UEFI, so while I'm familiar with the SUSE custom install, there's new stuff for me to worry about t his time.

Edited by ebrke, 16 July 2018 - 04:03 PM.

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